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Don't know if what i did fixed everything, but for now i solved my problem by copying libplayback.so and other compiled plugins binaries to the folder with libcoreelements.so It appears that the problem was caused by the non-standard installation directories, so my solution is a hotfix, since I still don't know how was it possible that gst-inspect-1.0 ...


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Sure, you can use that same PC pipeline in Android code. Take a look at GStreamer's Android Tutorial 3 to see how to run GStreamer code on Android. You can basically run that exact tutorial program on your Android device, just paste your pipeline into call to gst_parse_launch. Also, make sure to add the INTERNET permission to your Android manifest, otherwise ...


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This might also be because the encoding pipeline is seriously under pressure. Do you get any warnings with that encoding pipeline ? with GST_DEBUG=3 for example. What version of GStreamer are you using ? Generating a 1920x1080@60fps stream by videotestsrc is ... very cpu intensive (it's meant for debugging purposes).


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As you noticed you are missing PTS/DTS values which are essential timestamps for the decoder: it tells when to decode and present a frame. I don't think you can manually generate it as it is normally done during the muxing operation. It seems that mpv succeed in emulate them, this is why you have a clean render, but obviously you TV cannot. Have you tried ...


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Using the first solution (official binaries from GStreamer), you need to tell the configure script where everything is located. The simplest way is to set the environment variable PKG_CONFIG_PATH to where the .pc files are located. Generally it's in $install_directory/lib/pkgconfig/ Replace $install_directory with the actual location, ex if it's ...


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This is one of the reasons why the official package contains gstreamer and all other dependencies. You should download and use the official package, that way you will not have to worry about installing gstreamer and other required packages.


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I think you are using gstreamer 1.0, If I am not wrong then try to use "playbin" instead of "palybin2" "playbin2" is renamed to "playbin" from gstreamer 1.0


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When you are trying to a prebuilt lib file onto your existing/new NDK project, you need to do the following 1. Create a JNI folder and copy the lib file into the folder corresponding to the right architecture(x86,armeabi,mips). If you have multiple versions of the same library corresponding to each architecture, then create as many folders and add them ...


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use playbin instead of playbin2. self.player = Gst.ElementFactory.make("playbin", "player") ElementFactory.make returns none because there isn't playbin2 element in Gst-1.0. Playbin2 is in the Gst-0.1


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You can find a exemple, with some explaination how to use videomixer using videomixer


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From their website : The GStreamer team is pleased to announce binary builds for GStreamer 1.0.7, the plugin modules and all their dependencies ... Builds are currently provided for Windows (32/64 bit), Mac OS X (32/64 bit x86) and Android (ARM). Future releases will include support for iOS. 2013-06-10 You aren't facing a compatibility problem, but this ...


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Your issue might be the linking order of the libraries. When linking libraries, the order actually matter. For example, if libA requires symbol from libB, then you need to link in the order of -lA -lB. If you reverse the order then the linking would fail. My guess is that if you linked glib before gstreamer then it would fail, as gstreamer depends on ...


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Well, if I compile #include <iostream> #include <gst/gst.h> using namespace std; int main(int argc, char **argv) { GstElement *myFirstElement; gst_init(&argc, &argv); myFirstElement = gst_element_factory_make("fakesrc", "source"); if(!myFirstElement) return -1; gst_object_unref(GST_OBJECT(myFirstElement)); return ...


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The feedback squeal can be avoided if you introduce a time delay, perhaps a FIFO buffer. This way the rendered audio does not have a real-time forward feedback loop.


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After audioconvert, you can add a tee and queue to have a new branch. You can have something like that: autoaudiosrc ! audioconvert ! tee name="source" ! queue ! vorbisenc ! oggmux ! filesink location=file.ogg source. ! queue ! audioconvert ! alsasink


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First of all you should use a GStreamer 1.x version, the 0.10 versions are no longer supported and you're missing basically 3+ years of bugfixes, new features and other improvements. But the problem in your pipeline is that you put the output of rtspsrc to multipartdemux. rtspsrc will output one or more RTP streams that have to be depayloaded, decoded, etc. ...


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You can use a capsfilter to force a specific format, like: gst-launch-1.0 v4l2src device=/dev/video7 ! capsfilter caps="video/x-raw, width=<width>, height=<height>" ! autoconvert ! theoraenc ... If you are using gstreamer 0.10 (which you shouldn't, it is 2 years obsolete now), you need to use "video/x-raw-yuv, width=, height=; video/x-raw-rgb, ...


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You will have to use GStreamer 1.3.90 or newer and the ksvideosrc element that is available only since that version. And then you can stream it just like any other input... the details depend on what codecs, container format, streaming protocol and network protocol you want to use. The same goes for audio, that works basically exactly the same as video. ...


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The best way to do it really synchronized with the video would be to use something like the cairooverlay element and do the rendering yourself directly inside the pipeline, based on the actual timestamps of the frames. Or alternatively write your own element for doing that. The easiest solution if timing is not needed to be super accurate would be to use ...


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It seems OpenCV is not ported to GStreamer 1.x yet, but other distributions are just disabling the GStreamer module of OpenCV anyway. It's not that useful, especially if you use GStreamer directly anyway. Porting it would seem like 2 hours of work though. Not that this necessarily helps you, but best would be to try building OpenCV with GStreamer support. ...


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Are you sure you are using the API correctly ? dump_pat is expecting a defined structure as a parameter, not a TS file, cf gst-libs/gst/mpegts/gstmpegtssection.h: typedef struct _GstMpegTsSection GstMpegTsSection; Have a look at the FAQ and the Documentation of Gstreamer.


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Parse.Launch does not use the command line indirectly, it just behaves like gst-launch. You can also create an element using the ElementFactory and pass it the parameters like this: var playbin = ElementFactory.Make("playbin", "my-playbin"); playbin["uri"] = "file:///a:/test.avi";


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Take a look at the existing GStreamer muxers. Basically the rate control is done there by using GstCollectPads to wait for one buffer on every sinkpad and then block, and once every sinkpad has a buffer you mux them together (properly synchronizing them relative to each other) and then forward the data. So rate control is done by blocking inside the muxer, ...


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I know this is an older post, but you can set the GstX264EncPreset value using a simple integer that corresponds to the preset value. g_object_set(encoder, "speed-preset", 2, NULL); works for me. The values can be found using gst-inspect-1.0 x264enc and are as follows: speed-preset : Preset name for speed/quality tradeoff options (can affect ...


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You probably want to use the 1.x versions of GStreamer, the currently latest stable release can be found here: http://gstreamer.freedesktop.org/data/pkg/android/1.2.4.1/ This release also contains the RTMP plugin. Also the 0.10 versions are no longer supported by the community since a few years, and you're missing literally thousands of bugfixes, new ...


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Alternatively, OpenCV (2.4.x or newer) can open GStreamer pipelines. See Using custom camera in OpenCV (via GStreamer) for an example. And, openCV 3.0 (development branch) integrates with GStreamer 1.0, which is very nice.


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I had to use a different code. This code is works fine: Gst.Application.Init (); var pipeDescription = "playbin uri=file:///a:/test.avi "; var pipeline = Gst.Parse.Launch(pipeDescription) as Gst.Bin; var someElementInPipe = pipeline.GetChildByName("myBin") as Gst.Element; pipeline.SetState(Gst.State.Playing);


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I know some years have passed since your original question, but just for the record, opencv can open gstreamer pipelines directly. See the (self-)answer in Using custom camera in OpenCV (via GStreamer) for an example. And, by the way, opencv 3.0 (master branch) actually integrates gstreamer 1.0 support.


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I finally solved my problem. I did not manage the byte-stream thing through a pipe, but I managed to use an AppSrc to feed the gst pipeline. So my whole pipeline (might be useful for other people) looks like this : appsrc -> rtpvp8depay -> vp8dec -> videoconvert -> videoscale -> appsink (I'm using Gstreamer1.0 on ArchLinux). Hope this helps ...


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I ended up resorting to playbin2. It manages to build a working pipelines that do send tags message somehow.


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Real problem was that rtmpsync need raw aac, so I added aacparse and it worked out, something like this: gst-launch-1.0 v4l2src ! \ "video/x-raw, framerate=25/1, width=320, height=240" ! \ omxh264enc target-bitrate=300000 control-rate=variable ! \ h264parse ! queue ! flvmux name=muxer alsasrc device=hw:1 ! \ audioresample ! ...


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The problem was that the port parameter is supposed to be an int, so I had to change g_object_set(G_OBJECT(udp), "port", "5000", NULL); to g_object_set(G_OBJECT(udp), "port", 5000, NULL); Sometimes it's easy to miss one's own simple mistakes.


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Add to xvimagesink: xvimagesink sync=false. Otherwise it will be polling for a new frame all the time. udpsink also does have a sync parameter.


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The environment variable which contains the output displayed by the prompt is named PS1. You can empty this variable when needed. Don't forget to keep a 'backup' of the value in order to be able to set it back to its old value


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If you're using the AppSrc sample then there's a rather easy solution which is to wrap the Gst.Buffer allocation in a using statement. E.G. Change the following method static void PushAppData (object o, Gst.App.NeedDataArgs args) { ulong mseconds = 0; if (appsrc.Clock != null) mseconds = appsrc.Clock.Time / Clock.MSecond; Gst.Buffer buffer = ...


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I solved this problem with change of appsrc property "format" from GST_FORMAT_BUFFERS to GST_FORMAT_TIME. Correct timestamps on buffers is not enought.


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After some trials with gstreamer i decided to do the conversion myself and it worked First we have to understand the YUVj420p pixel format As shown in the above image, the Y', U and V components in Y'UV420 are encoded separately in sequential blocks. A Y' value is stored for every pixel, followed by a U value for each 2×2 square block of pixels, and ...


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How exactly are you getting the frames from your camera? And how you inject it into your opencv application? Supposing you get your frames outside of gstreamer you should use a pipeline like: appsrc caps="video/x-raw, format=I420, width=640, height=368" ! videoconvert ! capsfilter caps="video/x-raw, format=RGB" ! appsink And then use appsrc to inject the ...


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My guess is that GStreamer doesn't find its plugins. It expects these .dlls in a specific folder. You can use the environment variable GST_PLUGIN_PATH to point GStreamer to the right folder. Simply call putenv("GST_PLUGIN_PATH=path/to/plugins/) before invoking gst_init(). Alternatively according to this thread you can also place them into the ...


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FYI: JJPMEG It is a Java binding to FFmpeg and it have an android verison too. Maybe you can give it a try. https://code.google.com/p/jjmpeg/ Or: Maybe you can just record the video with supporting encoding and transcode the video in the server side?


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When going through a named pipe, the RTP are not packetized properly. You could either, Send the encoded stream directly through as a byte-stream, without using the rtpvp8pay element. Use another RTP element in GStreamer that handles byte-stream format, such as rtpstreampay or rtpgdppay. (I believe the rtpstreampay might be a GStreamer 1.0 element though.) ...


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If you have a video encoded with mjpeg, you can avoid re-encoding your video and have identical frames -- only fewer. I use a combination of ffmpeg and awk to accomplish this: #!/bin/bash INMOVIE=${1} INRATE=${2} OUTMOVIE="${INMOVIE%.avi}-25fps.avi" ffmpeg -i ${INMOVIE} -c:v copy .frame_%08d.jpg rm $(ls .frame_*.jpg | awk " BEGIN { c=0.0; fd=1./${INRATE}; ...


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It's going to be dependent on your hardware. What device are you running on? If your processor contains an IP core that implements video encoding/decoding, the manufacturer needs to either offer a driver so you can call this hardware, or ideally go a step further and offer a specific plugin for GStreamer that does it. For example, the Freescale i.MX6 ...



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