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31

This isn't a bug in your code, and it's not a crash either. It's actually just a warning that g_source_remove() was called to disconnect a certain event handler that was already disconnected, in this case, in code that is part of gtk. The warning itself was introduced in glib 2.39, in this commit, and seems like only arch linux users are affected by it ...


19

I would say that it depends: if you find that using Glade you can build the apps you want or need to make than that's absolutely fine. If however you actually want to learn how GTK works or you have some non-standard UI requirements you will have to dig into GTK internals (which are not that complicated). Personally I'm usually about 5 minutes into a rich ...


15

The short story: If you're programming for GTK 2, use pyGTK. If you're programming for GTK 3, use pyGObject. The long story: From what I understood, pyGTK was based on pyGObject. GObject is the "object" API of GTK. GTK is developped in C, which is not an object-oriented language. GObject is a library that provides advanced object-oriented facilies. All ...


13

Box packing is really simple, so perhaps your failure to understand it is because you imagine it is more complicated than it is. Layout is either Vertical (like a pile of bricks) or horizontal (like a queue of people). Each element in that layout can expand or it can not expand. Horizontal (HBox) [widget][widget][widget][widget] Vertical (VBox) ...


12

Use GtkBuilder instead of Glade, it's integrated into Gtk itself instead of a separate library. The main benefit of Glade is that it's much, much easier to create the interface. It's a bit more work to connect signal handlers, but I've never felt that matters much.


10

My understanding of those components you mentioned: Think of GI as an interface that the core GNOME libraries conform to. PyGI doesn't exist any more; it's now part of PyGObject in the GNOME 3 setup. What is the relation between GTK, GTK+ and GTK2?


9

There are several methods. Use XSendEvent. Caveat: some application frameworks ignore events sent with XSendEvent. I think Gtk+ doesn't, but I have not checked. Use XTestFakeMotionEvent and XTestFakeButtonEvent. You need XTest extension on your X server. Write a kernel driver for your device so that it will appear as a mouse/touchpad.


8

I just want to add some more alternatives to this common request. libgoffice This is the library used by Gnumeric and AbiWord, so it is actively maintained and fairly stable: one of the sanest alternative currently available. Unfortunately, there is no official home page and it lacks beginners documentation. GtkDatabox It recently changed the maintainer, ...


8

You are facing the problem that you have several event systems at once but only one thread. Gtk+ comes with its own event handler, that eventually boils down to a select() which will wake up on any user input or other gtk event. You yourself want to handle networking with your own event handling, which typically consists of a select() on your socket(s) or ...


8

The Linux input system has a facility for user-space implementation of input devices called uinput. You can write a background program that uses your device's callback library to send input events to the kernel. The X server (assuming it is using the evdev input module) would then process these just as any other mouse event. There's a library called ...


8

The value of event->keyval when shift+s is pressed is GDK_S, not GDK_s. In other words, GDK has already interpreted the keyboard for you, giving you the symbol 'S', not 's'. The shift mask is still set, though. You can see this by adding a case for GDK_S: ... case GDK_S: // add this line case GDK_s: if (event->state & GDK_SHIFT_MASK) { ...


7

Here's a GTK2 application using cairo to draw a simple math function: #include <gtk/gtk.h> #include <math.h> #include <cairo.h> #define WIDTH 640 #define HEIGHT 480 #define ZOOM_X 100.0 #define ZOOM_Y 100.0 gfloat f (gfloat x) { return 0.03 * pow (x, 3); } static gboolean on_expose_event (GtkWidget *widget, GdkEventExpose ...


7

You are linking the same program to Gtk+2.0 and Gtk+3.0. And that will not work. It is easy to check: just run the pkg-config command standalone. BTW, you do not need to repeat --libs so many times, and since we are looking for linking errors, I'm ommiting the --cflags for clarity: $ pkg-config --libs gtk+-2.0 clutter-gtk-1.0 gthread-2.0 Now, it writes a ...


6

No, I don't believe it is possible yet although the best place to ask would be the gtk-perl-list. As I understand it, the future of Perl bindings for Gtk is using the gobject-introspection API to automate as much as possible. Work is progressing in this area but I'm sure help would be welcome.


6

The coolest thing would be to implement a device driver inside the Kernel that creates a /dev/input/eventX file which speaks the evdev protocol. I recommend you to read the book called Linux Device Drivers if you want to do this. The book is freely available on the web. If you want to do this in user space, I suggest you to use Xlib (or XCB). On plain Xlib ...


6

Not sure this is easily doable in GTK2. However, I learned recently that there's the GtkLayout widget which allows pixel exact rendering of widgets, so you can even display some widgets over others. Or you may implement your own container widget. Please note that since GTK3, there's GtkOverlay which seem to do what you want. You may also give a look to ...


5

If you want to change font overall in your app(s), I'd leave this job to gtkrc (then becomes a google question, and "gtkrc font" query brings us to this ubuntu forums link which has the following snippet of the the gtkrc file): style "font" { font_name = "Corbel 8" } widget_class "*" style "font" gtk-font-name = "Corbel 8" (replace the font with the one ...


5

Glade is very useful for creating interfaces, it means you can easily change the GUI without doing much coding. You'll find that if you want to do anything useful (e.g. build a treeview) you will have to get familiar with various parts of the GTK documentation - in practice finding a good tutorial/examples.


5

ptomato is right, you are using == where you should be using =. Your code should look like this: char *ButtonStance = "Connect"; GtkWidget *EntryButton = gtk_button_new_with_label(ButtonStance); gtk_box_pack_start(GTK_BOX(ButtonVbox), EntryButton, TRUE, TRUE, 0); gtk_box_pack_start(GTK_BOX(TopVbox), ButtonVbox, TRUE, TRUE, 0); ...


5

Definitely go with GTK 3. The 10-minute tutorials on http://developer.gnome.org/ use GTK 3 and are an excellent introduction to programming with GTK in several languages, including Python. In the coming months you will probably see more tutorials appear for GTK 3, and in the meantime, you will still be able to get most tutorials for GTK 2 to work with a ...


5

You are correct with your original syntax. g_signal_connect(window, "key-release-event", G_CALLBACK(key_event), NULL); Where the key_event function looks something like (note I am using the gdk_keyval_name to convert the keyval int value to a string for printing): static gboolean key_event(GtkWidget *widget, GdkEventKey *event) { ...


5

Install libwebkitgtk-devel.␠


5

GTK 3.0 has a different theming than GTK 2.0. Probably any of your other GTK+ applications still depend on 2.0 so you don't have set a theme for 3.0. Find out how to set it to e.g. Adwaita in your desktop environment. Btw: have a look at Glib::RefPtr<>.


4

I usually start with Glade until I come to a point where it doesn't have the features I need, e.g. creating a wizard. As long as I'm using the standard widgets that Glade provides, there's really no reason to hand-code the GUI. The more comfortable I become with how Glade formats the code, the better my hand-coding becomes. Not to mention, it's real easy to ...


4

I started out using glade, but soon moved to just doing everything in code. Glade is nice for simple things, and it's good when you're learning how GTK organizes the widgets (how things are packed, etc). Constructing everything in code, however, you have much more flexibility. Plus, you don't have the glade dependency.


4

If you're writing a traditional GUI application which reuses a lot of standard components from GTK+ (buttons, labels, containers etc.) I'd personally go with Glade + Kiwi (a convenience framework for building GTK+ GUI applications). The single greatest advantage to using Glade is that it greatly reduces layout/packing code. Here's an extremely simply ...


4

I think you have to call super before anything else at the initialization phase: def initialize super # Other code goes here # ... end Also don't forget to add Gtk.main : main_window = MainWindow.new # Don't forget this... Gtk.main


4

GtkImage does not have any window associated to it; in other words it does not react to any X event (generally, the ones ending with -event). The common way to handle events on those widgets is by using GtkEventBox, that is placing the GtkImage widget inside a GtkEventBox and connecting X event signals to this GtkEventBox.


4

$btn->clicked actually emits the clicked signal. What you want to do is connect a function to the signal: $btn->connect('clicked', 'change_background'); function change_background($whichbutton) { $im = GtkImage::new_from_file(loc()."\bg2.jpg"); $whichbutton->set_image($im); }


4

The short answer is no; images in TextView are just treated as a character (which may be a lot bigger than a usual character). There isn't any layout engine in the HTML sense. (Layout is limited to what PangoLayout can do.) You could probably hack something together, using an approach such as: leave a margin the size of the image on your paragraph add an ...



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