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Answer #3 My second answer can be further refined to place the subcomparer within the less<pair_<T,Q>> object itself: Live On Coliru #include <algorithm> #include <boost/multi_index_container.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/random_access_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/ordered_index.hpp> #include ...


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Answer #2 My first answer can be refined to get what you're after, I think: Live On Coliru #include <algorithm> #include <boost/multi_index_container.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/random_access_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/ordered_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/identity.hpp> #include <functional> ...


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I don't think it's proper to use Guava Cache in EJB. Although Guava Cache doesn't create new Thread, it manages Thread. There are sychronized block and ReentrantLock in the cache. So it is not proper behavior in EJB.


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It seems this a recurring question ([1], [2], [3]). I, myself, have stumbled upon this same problem. Weblogic is loading first it's own version of the (outdated) guava lib confliting with your applcation's version. The solution is to add the prefer-application-packages to your weblogic.xml or weblogic-application.xml: <wls:container-descriptor> ...


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As an aditional information, I landed on this question with a similar problem while upgrading to Weblogic 12c due to a conflit between WL and Guava (have tried with versions 11 and 18 of Guava). I found the solution to be to explicitly prefer my application's lib. I set this on my weblogic.xml: <prefer-application-packages> ...


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The problem is easily resolved without such hacks as the one suggested by @meilechh. You can add prefer-application-packages to your weblogic.xml or weblogic-application.xml. Look at http://docs.oracle.com/middleware/1212/wls/WLPRG/classloading.htm#WLPRG315 for the reference.


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This seems to do what you want: public void test() { System.out.println("Hello"); Multimap<String, String> myMultimap = ArrayListMultimap.create(); // Adding some key/value myMultimap.put("Fruits", "Bannana"); myMultimap.put("Fruits", "Apple"); myMultimap.put("Fruits", "Pear"); myMultimap.put("Vegetables", "Carrot"); ...


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A Multimap is a Map of key -> collection, and for such a class use nested foreach loops over the appropriate collections: Multimap<String, String> myMultimap; for (Map.Entry<String, List<String>> entry : myMultimap.entrySet()) { for (String value ; entry.getValue()) { System.out.println(entry.getKey() + ":" + value); } }


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I think the entries method does what you want Assuming you are talking about the Google Guava variation of MultiMap


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In versions of Google Play services prior to 6.5, you had to compile the entire package of APIs into your app. In some cases, doing so made it more difficult to keep the number of methods in your app (including framework APIs, library methods, and your own code) under the 65,536 limit. From version 6.5, you can instead selectively compile Google Play ...


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Answer #1 Why is Boost.MultiIndex not helping you here? Live On Coliru #include <boost/multi_index_container.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/sequenced_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/ordered_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/composite_key.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/member.hpp> using namespace ...


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Guava has a different mechanism for "a cache that only ever contains one value"; it's called Suppliers.memoizeWithExpiration. private Supplier<Map<Range<Double>, String> cachedMap = Suppliers.memoizeWithExpiration( new Supplier<Map<Range<Double>, String>() { public Map<Range<Double>, String> ...


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Do not mix caching and business logic. Unless your score mapping is huge AND you can load individual pieces, e.g. using readMappingFromS3(Double d) - simply cache the whole map. public static final String MAGIC_WORD = "oh please please give me my data!!!"; private final LoadingCache<String, Map<Range<Double>, String>> ...


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One way to handle this is to use Files.probeContentType(Path) (JDK 7) to try to get the content type. If that returns non-null, you can use MediaType.parse(String) to get it as a MediaType. Keep in mind, though, that probeContentType is entirely dependent on the installed FileTypeDetectors, if any, for its behavior.


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The full solution to this question requires null annotations in the Optional API. In particular of() should be declared to return @NonNull. Until the library authors annotate their API, you will need external annotations, support for which is being developed for Eclipse Mars. See https://wiki.eclipse.org/JDT_Core/Null_Analysis/External_Annotations OTOH, ...


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As ColinD and Louis Wasserman have mentioned, generic type erasure does not erase generic type information about the super class. Here is also an interesting blog post about it. The trick is to extend a class that declares generic type. This allows to use getGenericSuperclass() to retrieve generic type information. private static class ...


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If you can get a TypeToken<List<String>>, you can get the return type of its get method (as shown in the example). But if you have some arbitrary List<?> instance, you won't be able to get a TypeToken representing the actual type of that list (e.g. List<String>) because that information doesn't exist at runtime.


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You're trying to get the method get from ArrayList. You should be getting it from List. Class<?> clazz = List.class; Method getMethod = clazz.getMethod("get", int.class); The javadoc for TypeToken#method(Method) states Returns the Invokable for method, which must be a member of T. where T is the type variable declared in TypeToken.


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Ehcache expiration does not offer such a feature out of the box. You still have some options: Configure the TTL when creating the Element with a computed value. Use refresh-ahead or even better scheduled refresh ahead Have a look at the following question. Note that this may not work with all configurations as sometimes the Element gets re-created ...


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I think that camel do this by default. Available as of Camel 2.12 Message History is enabled by default from Camel 2.12. During routing Camel captures how the Exchange is routed, as a org.apache.camel.MessageHistory entity that is stored on the Exchange. On the org.apache.camel.MessageHistory there is information abut the route id, processor id, ...


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According to GemFire docs: You configure for eviction based on entry count, percentage of available heap, and absolute memory usage. You also configure what to do when you need to evict: destroy entries or overflow them to disk. See Persistence and Overflow. ...


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You need to unregister all components you previously registered as there is no WeakEventBus. Note that unregistering an object @throws IllegalArgumentException if the object was not previously registered. unless the object has no @Subscribe methods. The Javadoc is not exact, as both registering and unregistering such objects do nothing at all (and never ...


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I have found the issue. It appears that making the XYSeries static means that it is then carried across all instances of the class, so when a new value is being added to the series for each instance, after it deals with the first one on the queue the others get the same series, when you try and add another data point with the same X value as an existing one ...


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As the guava ImmutableEnumMap is still marked beta as of version 14, I would suggest using a unmodifiable view of a enum map and then throwing away the original reference to the enum map to ensure that it is immutable. Example (in a constructor): Map entries = new EnumMap <SomeEnum, T>(SomeEnum.class); ... // (fill in entries) this.entries = ...


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Simple method to get an immutable copy of your map sorted by descending value. Remove the call to reverse() if you want ascending order. Requires Google Guava. private Map<String, String> mapSortedByValues(Map<String, String> theMap) { final Ordering<String> ordering = ...


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This is how my business logic looks like: from(incomingUri).routeId(ROUTE_ID) ... .doTry() .bean(stopwatch, "start") .to(externalService) .doCatch(NoHttpResponseException.class, ProtocolException.class, IOException.class) ...


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I strongly suspect you are using an outdated version of Guava. When I run your code with Guava 18.0, I get 1.001370499582369E-8, which is a perfectly reasonable output.


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I'm not really sure what you want, but you can rewrite your code like this: RussianNestingDoll doll = RussianNestingDoll.get(RussianNestingDoll.get(RussianNestingDoll.get())); String content = doll.getInnerDoll() .flatMap(d -> d.getInnerDoll()) .map(d -> d.get().toString()) .orElse("empty"); ...


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Do you want to flatMap? thirdDollContents .flatMap(Function.identity()) // un-nest, get back an Optional<RussianNestingDoll> .get() // or isPresent() The flatMap will return an empty Optional if thirdDollContents is empty.


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"Effective Java" seems quite adamantly in favor of throwing a NullPointerException IllegalArgumentException or NullPointerException for a null parameter?


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I agree with Aaron. My two cents is that since in Java 7 Objects.requireNonNull was added and it throws a NullPointerException, that is the way I go. To me it seems like the language developers have weighed in on this issue by doing so.


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API of both classes is not the same. I would not change this by regexp. Three differences which are important in my opinion: Optional in Guava is abstract which means objects are subclasses. In Java is final which means there are no sub classes. In guava Optional is Serializable. in Java Optional is not Serializable. Methods are not exactly the same.


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There is no right way. Some people argue NPE since you passed a null pointer. Plus you can directly use Preconditions.checkNotNull() without any additional checks in code that you have to write (!=null is another 6-10 key presses, after all, plus people have to read more code to understand what you're doing). Preconditions.checkArgument() makes more sense ...


0

I'm not sure if I understand the problem correctly, but following code works just fine: import com.google.common.collect.{ImmutableList} val l = ImmutableList.of("A", "B", "C", "D") val s = l.toArray(Array[String]()).mkString(",") //s is now "A,B,C,D"


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As Jon Skeet points out, you haven't said what benefits you expect from using Optional. You'll get the same result as the original code with return Optional.fromNullable(myObject) .transform(new Function<MyObject, String> { @Override public String apply(MyObject input) { return input.foo(); ...


1

Couple options here. First, you could declare ENVIRONMENT_SUPPLIER as default scope. In this case, the test (which should be in the same package) would have access to it and could test it. Second, and probably better, if it is a complicated class that does time-consuming work, it would be a great idea to break it into its own class. This not only allow ...


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Edit: If you really want it, you may create a "branch": ComparisonChain comparator = ComparisonChain.start() .compare("a", "a"); ComparisonChain branch = comparator.compare("a", "b"); assertTrue(comparator.result() == 0); assertTrue(branch.result() != 0); i.e -->compare("a", "a")--->result \ ...


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You're ignoring the return value of comparator.compare("a", "b"). Calling compare() doesn't change the state of the existing comparison - it returns a comparison with the right state (which may or may not be the same - as long as the result of the comparison is 0, the state will be "active"). Change your code to use: comparator = comparator.compare("a", ...


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there is no type bundle, change it to <dependency> <groupId>com.google.guava</groupId> <artifactId>guava</artifactId> <version>18.0</version> </dependency> http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/google/guava/guava/18.0/


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According to the Guava official project page, there are no alternatives to the one jar packaging. I am not sure who is behind the modular jars, since they came from Maven Central in which there is no way to know who was the original publisher of the packages (that wouldn't happen if the package was published directly to Bintray). Since there is no way to ...


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Agree with Joe and plus: null handling. See the method signature: checkArgument(boolean expression, @Nullable Object errorMessage)


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Why is the signature not join(Object... args) Simply because the Guava team wants you to make sure that you actually join objects. To do that, you need at least 2 arguments. So the first two arguments are not checked at runtime with an exception, but at compile-time by explicitly forcing you to use more than one object. So it's a design to force you to ...


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In the method join(@Nullable Object first, @Nullable Object second, Object... rest) the last parameter rest is an Object array, that's Object[]. In the first case: join(first, lastName, null) when you use null there is no way to know what type it is, so it's assumed to be (Object[]) (as it matches the method signature) so the parameter rest is null. ...


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Why does check* methods in Google Precondition library take an Object instead of a String? Performance. If I have an object that is not already a String, particularly one where toString() is an expensive method, then: checkArgument(valid, obj.toString()); will unconditionally call toString() and immediately discard the result. On the other hand: ...


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This is correct behavior. Actually, client code doesn't care WHEN the elements are expired, right? Client code does care about WHAT final cache values are. The RemovalListener focuses on WHAT is evicted instead of WHEN. JavaDoc of RemovalListener.onRemoval(): Notifies the listener that a removal occurred at some point in the past. By the way, I ...


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This behaviour is expected. You can imagine a Table being a Map<String, Map<String, Object>> internally. It's literally a 2D table, a grid you could draw on a paper which has one cell for each value. A "vmstat_usage" map can only hold one value for "cpu_idle". What you want is probably a Map<String, Map<String, ...


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Just a small addition to Mark Peters' answer. With RegularImmutableSet the order gets preserved by storing the elements twice (once ordered, once hashed). This is still cheaper than the original HashSet which delegates to HashMap which creates an entry for each element stored. There are optimized implementations SingletonImmutableSet and EmptyImmutableSet. ...


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The only confirmation I see in the documentation is the following: this class's factory methods create hash-based instances, ... In other words, you can expect lookups to use a hashing mechanism (and thus have performance characteristics) similar to HashSet. The docs are deliberately vague so that various improvements can be made (for example, using a ...


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If you check the Hasher documentation, you will find out : Warning: Chunks of data that are put into the Hasher are not delimited. The resulting HashCode is dependent only on the bytes inserted, and the order in which they were inserted... As order matter, hashmaps with different key/value order produces different hashes. You may solve this by ...


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I believe the problem has to do with ordering. Even from one invocation to another, if you put the same key/value pair or value in a HashMap or HashSet respectively, there is no guarantee whatsoever that the ordering of entries will remain the same between two invocations. Much less so across JVM runs, of course. You therefore need to rewrite your hash ...



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