Hot answers tagged

9

Yes, that's what you should do. There is, so far as I know, no library for making this easier. A bit of advice, though: if at all possible, you should avoid using a scheme that requires you to use percent escapes in your history item string. The reason is that what location.hash returns when location.href ends in, say #%3C@%40 varies from browser to ...


8

The # token has special meaning in an URL. The browser interprets everything before the # token as the page to load, and everything after the # as additional information for on the page. This means if something is changed in the URL after the # token, the webpage is not reloaded, but it does create a browser history item. GWT uses this to create new history ...


7

No the browsers do not allow this. GWT uses Javascript (of course) to manipulate the browser history. The Javascript engines do not allow the removal of history entries. Maybe you could make a HistoryListener to skip the step you want removed, but you would have to keep track of history yourself in order to decide which way to skip (forward or backward)


5

You can simply use the native GWT history for that: History.back();


5

I'll try to outline an example setup that could work in your situation. There are lots of variations, but I'd like to concentrate on a simple one (and encourage you to think up where this can be adjusted). 1. Define URL tokens Choose some URL tokens like "#mainmenu" and "#editprefs" which will be appended to the host page's URL. They will be used for the ...


4

Use Anchor instead. As java doc of Hyperlink says: If you want an HTML hyperlink ( tag) without interacting with the history system, use Anchor instead.


4

Sorry, you can't. And even if you could, there are browsers, like Firefox, that let the user "jump" back more than one page. So if you try to relying on relative "coordinates" instead of absolute, the navigation could break your app. You can always append some kind of counter on your history token. It would not be hard, if you have only one history ...


4

It's a good idea to use the history for everything you want the user to be able to navigate back and forth with the browser's back- and forward-buttons. Moving between individual records seems like a good example - you might like to let them explore three records, and then move backwards through them. This won't be sufficient for some events, though. Say ...


4

If you use History.newItem(null); a new event will be fired. As a result, you will toggle your home page : http://www.mysuperwebsite.com/myapp# Having or not a # at the end is the same thing, am I wrong ? EDIT: ... // Get the last part of the url and remove #token String s = Location.getHref().substring(Location.getHref().lastIndexOf("/")); s = ...


4

If you want to avoid all this then don't put "login" in history. In this case you might want to implement login panel as modal dialog. So when user (or application) requests login, a modal dialog is shown with login entry field. When done with login, just close the dialog and reload the current page (to reflect the changes affected by login). You can use ...


4

You'd issue a normal PlaceController goTo to navigate to another place, but in your ActivityMapper, you'd return the exact same Activity instance as before. In that specific case, the ActivityManager doesn't stop/start the activity, but instead let it run it's own life (without even signaling the place has changed; if you want that, then have your ...


3

On first page load you are calling onHistoryChanged(INIT_STATE) by hand. This does not change history. Replace with this: public FirstPanel() { History.addHistoryListener(this); String token = History.getToken(); if (token.length() == 0) { History.newItem(INIT_STATE); } else { History.fireCurrentHistoryState(); } .. ...


3

Maybe you forgot to add History.fireCurrentHistoryState(); to end of onModuleLoad() method?


3

History.fireCurrentHistoryState() invokes your history handlers without actually inserting new history item in browser history stack, while History.newItem(token) does insert new history token into history stack. Note: if your current token is the same as new token (i.e. same page is reloaded), then browsers do not insert this into history stack. In this ...


3

Passing complex information between presenters is done best via events. However I wouldn't completely neglect History. If you want to support bookmarks and allow the user to load/go back to a specific application state/view you have to use History. You might use a hybrid approach between Activity/Places and Custom Events. Parse the history token ...


3

You're probably looking for History.newItem(newToken) (or History.newItem(newtoken, false) if you don't want it to fire an event). If it's not too late in your project, I'd suggest you use GWT Places though instead of History, and possibly GWT Activities (depending on your needs). I wrote a few articles about these a while back, when they were introduced ...


3

You cannot display two different tokens #m: and #t: at the same time as you cannot be in two places at the same time. So if both tabs and tree are displaying at the same time, then the state of both must be stored at once in the same place. This is more or less what you need. public class ExamplePlace extends Place { public String treePosition = "/"; ...


3

If you're using PlaceManager, you can call navigateBack() on an instance of PlaceManager.


3

You should implement Activities and Places pattern: http://www.gwtproject.org/doc/latest/DevGuideMvpActivitiesAndPlaces.html I am using it for 3 years, and it works very well. Note, however, that when you reload a page, you lose all of your state, data, etc. If you need to preserve some of it, you can use a combination of a Place (#page1) and a token that ...


2

I have just tested it with Firefox and Chrome for my application and page refresh does not clear the history. Which browser do you use? Do you have the <iframe src="javascript:''" id='__gwt_historyFrame' style='position:absolute;width:0;height:0;border:0'></iframe> in your HTML?


2

Gmail doesn't use GWT, so I'm assuming you just want a high-level answer. Gmail uses the URL fragment (the part after the #). As you navigate around in Gmail you'll notice that the fragment changes to a unique identifier for each "location" in Gmail's navigation. Using the fragment makes the browser do all the tracking for you without requiring page ...


2

You need to set a history token and fire the history change event with current token. Heres how you could do it: / If the application starts with no history token, redirect to a new // 'homepage' state. String initToken = History.getToken(); if (initToken.length() == 0) { History.newItem("homepage"); } // Add widgets etc // Add history listener ...


2

Instead of making all of your presenters extend PlaceRequestHandler and managing those events yourself, you can attach a PlaceHistoryHandler and a PlaceController to your event bus. Together, they manage the browser's history and your places for you. When you ask your PlaceController to goTo() a different place, it will stop your current activity and use ...


2

Here is some good documentation on the GWT History: http://developerlife.com/tutorials/?p=232 and Google's documentation on the host page: http://www.gwtapps.com/doc/html/com.google.gwt.doc.DeveloperGuide.Fundamentals.HostPage.html Giving the following code example: <!-- Include a history iframe to enable full GWT history support --> <!-- (the id ...


2

Using the History class? No. Javascript doesn't expose this information for security reasons. You shouldn't be able to spy on a user's browser history. That said, you could employ history sniffing tricks and do it, but those are all hacks of one form or another and, to my knowledge, are not very accurate. Your best bet would be to keep track of the history ...


2

I don't think you can/should change the hash sign. Mainly because this sign does not come from GWT but from HTTP specifications. You can read the part on hash fragments in this doc for a good explanation. The main point being that adding a # sign to a url will not cause a full browser refresh. This is why this sign is used for ajax and GWT's history. If you ...


2

See http://code.google.com/p/google-web-toolkit/issues/detail?id=7101 (there are links to sample code) Basically, you can only do this in a browser that supports HTML5's pushState and onpopstate. This rules out Internet Explorer, and unfortunately those people using PowerPointer are likely to also use IE, so basically you're doomed.


2

You should always call the History.fireCurrentHistoryState() at the end of your GWT onModuleLoad(). I think that should solve your problem. The thing is that the first history event ( like when you load page.com/#xyz ) is not captured by the ValueChangeHandler, you have to "fake it" with the History.fireCurrentHistoryState()


2

You need to dereference your this pointer so that you can use it as a reference: move(n-1, dest, *this);


2

Google tracks the # just fine. You just need to take it actually receives the # as-is (in our case the # got url-encoded to %23 and we had to use a search-and-replace-filter to restore it). The most elegant way would be probably to look in GA admin into the instructions for the advanced filter - there is a nice example how to rewrite obscure URls into ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible