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19

Look in the Expenses sample provided with GWT 2.1.0. Basically you need to add to the <ui:Binder tag: xmlns:c='urn:import:com.google.gwt.user.cellview.client' and then use it for example as: <c:CellTable addStyleNames='{desktop.table}' width='100%' ui:field='table' /> This is from the ExpenseReportList class. Ui widgets ...


13

For large GWT apps, a framework like gwt-platform (which is a fork of gwt-presenter and gwt-dispatch) is almost necessary. It provides things like Places for handling location/history, a handy Presenter framework, EventBus, and really simple codesplitting.


11

Nice example (oversimplified but clean conceptually) of GWT UI Design with CSS and HTML is Tags First GWT. I agree with you that if one follows generic examples from Google documentation it's not a pleasant experience. The things changed lately though but they don't yet get fully reflected in the Google docs. Try the following: before going on with GWT ...


9

First I would recommend you reading this: http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/doc/latest/DevGuideMvpActivitiesAndPlaces.html MVP - is a design pattern which will help you separate logic from your UI to make it easier to Unit test. It's pretty much derived from the MVC pattern. Activities - a concept in GWT analogous to the MVP pattern. I think activities ...


8

GWT Places, PlaceController, and PlaceHistoryMapper enable you to create bookmarkable URLs within your application that allow the browser's back button and bookmarks to work as one would expect. This is what GWT Places was designed for. Therefore it does not make sense to have more than one Place activated in an application at any point in time since you ...


8

I have to disagree, MVP makes code way less complex, especially in case of GWT. If you plan on medium to large size GWT project then MVP architecture is your primary option. I suggest to look at both GWT MVP (by Google) and at gwt-platform (suggested by KennethJ). There are other implementations as well. MVP's main benefits (I mean MVP pattern - not just ...


7

UiBinder (GWT 2.0) could be helpful


6

Shouldn't you pass the spied instance to your activity, instead of spying it afterwards? Note you can also use a com.google.gwt.event.shared.testing.CountingEventBus which is a simple EventBus (uses new SimpleEventBus unless you pass an EventBus instance to be wrapped) with the addition of a getCount(GwtEvent.Type) method. You'd then do an assertEquals(1, ...


6

You raise a valid point with large scale GWT application. I recently worked on 50.000+ line GWT portal app and we are getting buried in events and complex switch/handler patterns. There is a good blog post available here that describes how terrible this can become and also hints at a solution (see terrible footnote). However the new GWT2 UIBinder and MVP ...


6

Events registered via. the EventBus passed to AbstractActivity#start() will be unregistered by the time onStop() is called. The event handlers registered in the above bind() method, however, are not registered via the EventBus and are not visible to the abstract base class. You need to unregister them yourself: public class ContactsActivity extends ...


5

You don't have to put all your activities in the core (as you call it): while an Activity instance is retrieved synchronously, it's allowed to start asynchronously. This is where you'd put your GWT.runAsync call. See http://code.google.com/p/google-web-toolkit/issues/detail?id=5129 and ...


5

Place changes are actually controlled by ActivityMappers. They get a Place and return the corresponding Activity. This is where you control how Places are mapped to Activities: You need to create two ActivityMappers (MenuActivityMapper, ContentActivityMapper) and then instantiate two ActivityManagers each with it's own ActivityMappers. Then for each ...


5

This is a bit of a difficult one at the moment. It seems MVP is the flavour of the month (or year, as it were) but there are so many options available and very few actual tutorials. I went through the Contacts example and kinda got it: http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/articles/mvp-architecture.html Then I realised they had added Activities and Places in ...


5

There's no workaround. Your app somehow detects that the URL has changed, which triggers the place change (thus before navigation is confirmed). And there's no way to know why the URL changed; was it a "back"? a "forth"? a "back" using the history menu to go several steps back at a time? a bookmark? manual editing of the URL? So there's no way you could do ...


5

You should never call initWidget on rootLayoutPanel


5

Alternatives are: listen to PlaceChangeEvents from within the activity (you can then use a FilteredActivityMapper and CachingActivityMapper for the caching of the activity in your ActivityMapper, so that it's reduced to only create a new activity when asked). † have some component listen to PlaceChangeEvents and translate them to business-oriented events, ...


5

I think this is completely unmaintainable I do not agree with you. Large number of small files is much better for maintenance than couple large files. I agree that GWT is much more verbose than Spring MVC: You do not need all these interfaces because of dynamic nature of JSP JSP in Sppring MVC case is not strictly typed and give your abilities to do ...


4

The main benefit of using MVP with GWT, is the ability to unit test your presenters in isolation, using plain JUnit TestCase, instead relying on the painfully slow GwtTestCase. The other benefits, such as mainteinability, can be achieved using simpler project structures like @Maksym Demidas pointed out. So the real question is if you want/need that degree ...


4

You can simply use the native GWT history for that: History.back();


4

I use GWTP because it is reasonably well documented, easy to understand and has an active user community. When I started learning the framework I had to ask a couple of questions in the forums and on both occasions, I got a friendly and helpful response on the same day from one of the authors.


4

Here's how I would do: final Place1 place = new Place1("token"); Anchor anchor = new Anchor("go to place 1", "#" + placeHistoryMapper.getToken(place)); anchor.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() { public void onClick(ClickEvent event) { placeController.goTo(place); event.preventDefault(); } });


4

I would use a place and a goTO in the place controller. Take a look at this example: http://95.110.143.4/layoutmvp/layoutmvp.html Here is the code: http://95.110.143.4/layoutmvp/layoutmvp.tar.gz


4

MVP is a pattern Google created for the base GWT widgets, which do not have support for data binding built in. Google has never said that MVP applies to SmartGWT widgets, where the widgets already have support for data binding, and we (Isomorphic) strongly advise against trying to use Google MVP with SmartGWT unless you have very specific, very unusual ...


3

Let's start by debunking one myth: Activities/Places have nothing to do with MVP. Places is about navigation, Activities are about "componentizing" the UI wrt Places. On the other hand, MVP is a design pattern, it's about how to organize your code. Many people are using their activities as their MVP-presenters, but it's not enforced. The GWT team is trying ...


3

How about simply copy/pasting the code from Window.Location for the parsing (private method buildListParamMap; you can also call it using JSNI –which allows bypassing Java visibility– given that it's a static method with no state), and UrlBuilder.buildString for the serialization?


3

Performance wise there is no difference. It all depends how you use it. In the DeckLayoutPanel all children are kept in memory. But if you would implement the same thing with a SimplePanel you need to keep a pointer to those same children yourself, so the memory footprint would be about the same. Unless with a SimplePanel you create and render a child each ...


3

There isn't a great answer yet. I have code generation schemes in mind, but it's all scribbles on white boards at the moment. For Gin users it seems like a Place Scope might be handy. Re: the if / else cascade, one common approach is to make your Place objects implement the visitor pattern. E.g. let's assume you have AssistedInject set up for your ...


3

Your Place doesn't need to download the video. It could just contain the video's id. Your Activity will receive the Place, which has the video id, and now the Activity can do the downloading or whatever heavy lifting you want. So: Your PlaceTokenizer only needs to know enough to store the video id in the Place. Let the Activity do the work after that. ...


3

Follow this thread on the GWT mailing list. Use AsyncProvider as provided by the following enhancement.


3

Translatable codes will be translated to JavaScript. You should include everything that is needed on the client side. So if you have some object to transfer data from server to client and you have that in a package called "shared" you need to add a <source path='shared'/> to the contacts.gwt.xml file. It doesn't have to be the same name as the ...



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