Hot answers tagged

293

Use the -C switch of tar: tar -czvf my_directory.tar.gz -C my_directory . The -C my_directory tells tar to change the current directory to my_directory, and then . means "add the entire current directory" (including hidden files and sub-directories). Make sure you do -C my_directory before you do . or else you'll get the files in the current directory. ...


88

You can use the option -C (or --directory if you prefer long options) to give the target directory of your choice in case you are using the Gnu version of tar. The directory should exist: mkdir foo tar -xzf bar.tar.gz -C foo If you are not using a tar capable of extracting to a specific directory, you can simply cd into your target directory prior to ...


81

cd my_directory/ && tar -zcvf ../my_dir.tgz . && cd .. should do the job in one line. It works well for hidden files as well. "*" doesn't expand hidden files by path name expansion at least in bash. Below is my experiment: $ mkdir my_directory $ touch my_directory/file1 $ touch my_directory/file2 $ touch my_directory/.hiddenfile1 $ touch ...


76

This code does the trick // Name of the file we're compressing $file = "test.txt"; // Name of the gz file we're creating $gzfile = "test.gz"; // Open the gz file (w9 is the highest compression) $fp = gzopen ($gzfile, 'w9'); // Compress the file gzwrite ($fp, file_get_contents($file)); // Close the gz file and we're done gzclose($fp);


31

gzip -dc archive.tar.gz | tar -xf - -C /destination or, with GNU tar tar xzf archive.tar.gz -C /destination


28

The other answers here load the entire file into memory during compression, which will cause 'out of memory' errors on large files. The function below should be more reliable on large files as it reads and writes files in 512kb chunks. /** * GZIPs a file on disk (appending .gz to the name) * * From ...


16

Also, you could use php's wrappers, the compression ones. With a minimal change in the code you would be able to switch between gzip, bzip2 or zip. $input = "test.txt"; $output = $input.".gz"; file_put_contents("compress.zlib://$output", file_get_contents($input)); change compress.zlib:// to compress.zip:// for zip compression (see comment to this answer ...


15

You can also create archive as usual and extract it with: tar --strip-components 1 -xvf my_directory.tar.gz


14

This Answer should work in most situations. Notice however how the filenames are stored in the tar file as, for example, ./file1 rather than just file1. I found that this caused problems when using this method to manipulate tarballs used as package files in BuildRoot. One solution is to use some Bash globs to list all files except for .. like this: tar -C ...


12

You should be able to simply loop over the gzip reader like you do with regular streams (according to the docs) infile = open("file.log.gz") gz = Zlib::GzipReader.new(infile) gz.each_line do |line| puts line end


11

You don't need to download it. Take a look at their source code repository and read everything using your browser. Here's main.c for example. More details available at How to Access the Wget Source Code Repository.


11

Given the fact that you have a .tar.gz file, the first way you tried, with the -C option, will work just fine: tar xvzf /dir/to/file.tar.gz -C /dir/to/output/ tar calls gzip to decompress, and then extracts the files from the tar stream. gzip can only decompress, so gunzip file.tar.gz would simply leave with the decompressed file.tar, on which you would ...


10

Put this into your .vimrc : augroup gzip au BufReadPre *.GZ setlocal bin au BufRead *.GZ call gzip#read("gzip -dn") au BufWritePost *.GZ call gzip#write("gzip") au FileAppendPost *.GZ call gzip#write("gzip") au FileAppendPre *.GZ call gzip#appre("gzip -dn") au FileReadPost *.GZ call gzip#read("gzip -dn") au FileReadPre *.GZ ...


8

cd my_directory tar zcvf ../my_directory.tar.gz *


8

You're only adding the filename to the tar, not the entire path. You need to keep the whole path for Tar to be able to understand directories. You just need to change one line: h.Name = fi.Name() Should be: h.Name = _path On Linux, the output of tar -tvf test.tar.gz: -rw-rw-r-- 0/0 0 2012-11-28 11:17 test/0.txt -rw-rw-r-- 0/0 ...


7

There isn't one. The only way to get the exact size of a compressed stream is to actually go and decompress it (even if you write everything to /dev/null and just count the bytes). Its worth noting that ISIZE is defined as ISIZE (Input SIZE) This contains the size of the original (uncompressed) input data modulo 2^32. in ...


7

Have a look at --transform/--xform, it gives you the opportunity to massage the file name as the file is added to the archive: % mkdir my_directory % touch my_directory/file1 % touch my_directory/file2 % touch my_directory/.hiddenfile1 % touch my_directory/.hiddenfile2 % tar -v -c -f my_dir.tgz --xform='s,my_directory/,,' $(find my_directory -type f) ...


6

Take a look at the TarWriter class in rubygems: http://rubygems.rubyforge.org/rubygems-update/Gem/Package/TarWriter.html it just operates on an IO stream, which may be a StringIO. tar = StringIO.new Gem::Package::TarWriter.new(tar) do |writer| writer.add_file("hello_world.txt", 0644) { |f| f.write("Hello world!\n") } end tar.seek(0) p tar.read #=> ...


6

No need of a dll with CF8, use existing java library. Have a look at CFLib or try the following code: <cfscript> try{ /* Set inoutput */ gzFileName = "myFile.gz"; outputFile = "mygzFiles"; /* Initialize gzip */ var outStream = CreateObject("java","java.io.FileOutputStream"); var inStream = ...


6

gzcompress implements the ZLIB compressed data format that has the following structure: 0 1 +---+---+ |CMF|FLG| (more-->) +---+---+ (if FLG.FDICT set) 0 1 2 3 +---+---+---+---+ | DICTID | (more-->) +---+---+---+---+ +=====================+---+---+---+---+ |...compressed data...| ADLER32 | ...


6

comm -23 <(tar -tzf 1.tar.gz | sort) <(tar -tzf 2.tar.gz | sort)


6

You could try io module to read the gzipped file as text line by line with universal newlines support: import gzip import io with io.TextIOWrapper(io.BufferedReader(gzip.open(filename))) as file: for line in file: print line,


5

gzread only reads chunks of the file, you loop on it as you would using a normal read() call. Do you need to read the entire file into memory ? If what you need is to read lines, you'd gzread() a sizable chunk(say 8192 bytes) into a buffer, loop through that buffer and find all '\n' characters and process those as individual lines. You'd have to save the ...


5

gzip -cd compressed.gz | yourprogram just go ahead and read it line by line from stdin as it is uncompressed. EDIT: Response to your remarks about performance. You're saying reading STDIN line by line is slow compared to reading an uncompressed file directly. The difference lies within terms of buffering. Normally pipe will yield to STDIN as soon as the ...


5

Use the GZip Stream class to unzip the XML document. Something like: var file = File.Open("C:\test.xml.gz", FileMode.Open); var zip = new GZipStream(file, CompressionMode.Decompress); var doc = new XmlDocument(); doc.Load(zip); Edit To be more clean with our IDisposables: var doc = new XmlDocument(); using(var file = File.Open("C:\test.xml.gz", ...


5

If both install and work for you, it doesn't matter which one you choose. both formats accomplish the same thing, and result in the same software being installed. Another option in Ubuntu is using apt-get install, which is very simple, and automates the process.


5

The issue occurs because tar doesn't read every byte from your reader. After hashing each file, you need to empty the reader to ensure every byte is read and hashed. The way I normally do this is use io.Copy() to read until EOF. package main import ( "archive/tar" "compress/gzip" "crypto/md5" "fmt" "io" "io/ioutil" "os" ) func ...


5

This is a duplicate question, see here It links to this article For streaming tar files, see here.


5

TarReader is Enumerable, returning Entry. That said, to retrieve the text content from the file by it’s name one might uncompressed = Gem::Package::TarReader.new(Zlib::GzipReader.open(file)) text = uncompressed.detect do |f| f.fullname == 'base_folder/file_i_need.txt' end.read #⇒ Hello, I’m content of the text file, located inside gzipped tar Hope it ...


4

You could enable compression at IIS level for a specific directory. I believe this will be more efficient than doing it by hand in the generic handler. UPDATE: You could use GZipStream to compress the xml directly to thew response stream: public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context) { context.Response.ContentType = "application/x-gzip"; var ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible