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22

I used to write a lot of literate programs. What do you write as Haddock comments and what do you write in the literate part? The external API documentation goes into the Haddock comments. Everything else goes into the literate part. "Everything else" might include: Internal invariants of data structures Why you are doing things this way What the ...


18

The | at the start of a comment is Haddock syntax that begins a documentation annotation. An example from the Haddock documentation is: -- |The 'square' function squares an integer. square :: Int -> Int square x = x * x It also goes on to say The “-- |” syntax begins a documentation annotation, which applies to the following declaration in the ...


17

It's magic :) These are the "primitive operators and operations". They are hardwired into the compiler, hence there are no data constructors for primitives and all functions are bottom since they are necessarily not expressable in pure haskell. (Bottom represents a "hole" in a haskell program, an infinite loop or undefined are examples of bottom) To put ...


11

edit your config file: ~/.cabal/config there is a option to enable default install doc: documentation: True to install doc of existing packages, use: cabal install xxx --reinstall re-install docs from basic packages then the upper-level packages, so the "hyper-link" to other modules will be generated properly.


8

Packages are only built/documentation generated on a periodic basis. I don't know how often it is now -- used to be daily, but I think is somewhat more frequent. In any case, you should wait. Eventually, it will either build and generate documentation, or the build log will show what error took place.


8

Nowadays, the haddock version is tightly bound to the GHC version. For ghc-7.4.1, the corresponding haddock version was 2.10.0. The SafeHaskellMode type that is referred to in the error message was added in ghc-7.4.2, so you cannot compile haddock-2.11 with ghc-7.4.1. You should probably have a working haddock-2.10 that came with your GHC. If not, you can ...


8

If you want to store your image locally you can: -- A longer description of the package. description: Some haskell package description. <<file:///home/user/your_image.png>> Result: If you don't want or can't add image by relative path, just put image name without full path: <<your_image.png>> In this case, your image ...


7

A brief expansion of jozefg's answer ... Primops are precisely those operations that are supplied by the runtime because they can't be defined within the language (or shouldn't be, for reasons of efficiency, say). The true purpose of GHC.Prim is not to define anything, but merely to export some operations so that Haddock can document their existence. The ...


7

As explained in that mailing list thread you reference, one option is to use a data URL to inline images into your documentation. It makes the source itself somewhat unpleasant to read (since it is interspersed with large blobs of base64-encoded data), though using Haddock's named chunks can help, by putting all the images in named chunks at the end of the ...


7

If you intend to share programs on the internet, I've found a combination of literate haskell in markdown style with mathjax to be a great combination. The program "Pandoc" is seriously brilliant for taking this "markdown+lhs" to any format you desire, including PDF or HTML. If you tell Pandoc to output to HTML, you can use the -mathjax (or other similar ...


7

Sorry, my fault, the output was in main.txt, I guess I need to clean up my project sometime. This question can be deleted if it's not useful. The solution is: PROJECTDIR> haddock --hoogle **/*.hs PROJECTDIR> mv main.txt PROJNAME.txt PROJECTDIR> hoogle convert PROJNAME.txt PROJECTDIR> cp PROJNAME.txt PROJNAME.hoo HOOGLEDB HOOGLEDB> hoogle ...


6

Since the package relies on a C library, the package does not build on Hackage, meaning the documentation also does not build. You can generate the docs for yourself in the source directory for the package. You can get the source by running: $ cabal unpack libclang and then generate the docs by running: $ cd LibClang-0.0.9 $ cabal configure $ cabal ...


5

To silence the unused import warning, you can put a pragma at the top of your file: {-# OPTIONS_GHC -fno-warn-unused-imports #-} You can link to to identifiers that aren't in scope by explicitly qualifying them: It is also possible to refer to entities that are not in scope in the current module, by giving the full qualified name of the entity: -- | ...


5

No, it's not possible. Functions can have per-argument and per-type-param documentation, and it would make documentation inconsistent if you could: write different versions in different locations have one version override another introduce inconsistencies in argument documentation: what if you override the main doc string for a function; should the ...


4

I can partially answer the the first question (Why?); not sure if it is a bug or desired behaviour. When haddock resolves references in LexParseRn.rename, it tries to look up the identifier in the environment (via lookupGRE_RdrName). This ought to fail. Next it looks as what the thing could mean (using dataTcOccs from GHC’s RnEnv). The relevant lines are: ...


4

I'm going to echo the wisdom of the comments to your question and say, just use Cabal. It's not an extra thing to learn, it's something to learn instead precisely because it takes care of all these tedious details for you. You'll probably need to know about it anyway since everyone else uses it, so you might as well get the benefit of that knowledge. For ...


3

The --haddock flag didn’t work for me. However, replacing --haddock with --enable-documentation did: cabal install $project --enable-documentation Now, if they could allow the --hyperlink-source flag to zip through to haddock I’d be very happy.


3

This is a known issue. As a workaround you can configure your Apache installation (if you have one) to serve your doc directory using this small PHP script.


3

Oh, I thought those fields were from the cabal package description. They don't seem to be documented at all on Haddock's docs. I've found this, which doesn't really answer your question but: http://trac.haskell.org/haddock/ticket/71 So if it's freeform anyway, why not just write "non-portable (depends on glibc)"? I've seen even "portable (depends on ...


3

Haddock is designed to work with multiple output formats, including LaTeX, so it uses its own markup format instead of something like HTML. I don't think you can insert just a line break, but you can start a new paragraph by leaving a blank line, e.g. -- | First paragraph. -- -- Second paragraph.


3

Haddock documentation has to be attached to type signatures. Try this: -- | Main main :: IO () main = do print 3 Addition: It's also necessary to add: module Main(main) where in the beginning of the Main.hs, this allows haddock to find and document the main function.


3

It does make a difference if the haddocks of the package are created with the --internal flag to cabal haddock. $ cabal help haddock Usage: cabal haddock [FLAGS] Flags for haddock: -h --help Show this help text -v --verbose[=n] Control verbosity (n is 0--3, default verbosity level is 1) ...


3

If UTF-8 cannot be used and numeric character references like &#8721; or &­#x2211; (these are correct references for the n-ary summation symbol ∑) are regarded as unreadable, then I’m afraid the only option is to use named references like &sum;, if they get passed thru to the HTML result and are supported by the browser(s) that will be used. ...


3

Assuming your current module is Foo.Bar, one solution would be to break it up into Foo.Bar and Foo.Bar.Internal. You could move all the definitions related to the function you don't want to export--perhaps even all the definitions--into Foo.Bar.Internal. Then, in Foo.Bar, you would re-export only the definitions you want the world to see. This approach has ...


3

For me this worked: cabal update cabal install haddock Edit config file ~/.cabal/config Enable Documentation: True (removing "-- " at the beginning of the line is fine) Cabal Library: cd ...someNicePlace... cabal unpack Cabal Edit file Distribution/Simple/Setup.hs, therein find defaultHaddockFlags = ... I switched some of them from False to ...


2

I think it is a shortcoming/bug in haddock. Digging a little in the sources, the error message comes from declNames in Haddock/LaTeX.hs: declNames :: LHsDecl DocName -> [DocName] declNames (L _ decl) = case decl of TyClD d -> [unLoc $ tcdLName d] SigD (TypeSig lnames _) -> map unLoc lnames _ -> error "declaration not supported by ...


2

Unfortunately, haddock doesn't currently support showing the documentation for only a few of a record's fields as fields of that record. You can work around this either by exporting all fields: module Foo (ClientConn(..)) where ... or by exporting the fields, but not as fields: module Foo (ClientConn, cid, lookup, modify) where ... In the latter case, ...


2

You can't. You're using >>>. In order to have this rendered as an example, it needs to be at the beginning of the paragraph. What's considered a beginning of the paragraph? Anything at the start of a Haddock comment, skipping any white space preceding it. Anything following an empty line. In your scenario you have 4 paragraphs: list element, ...


1

Haddock has two syntaxes for code blocks -- the syntax that delimits blocks with @ allows you to use HTML escapes, which can be used to embed characters that Cabal's parser can't deal with. Unfortunately, it seems that Cabal strips the leading whitespace from @-delimited blocks, so you also have to prefix any lines with spaces with an HTML-encoded space ...


1

Ah yes, one of the more obscure and crufty features of Haddock. As best as I can tell, it's just an undocumented hack. There's no sane reason why the order of the fields should matter, but it does. The specific choice of formatting (i.e., as a special form inside the module comment rather than as a separate block of some kind) isn't the best either. My ...



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