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1

You need to add an escape for the character class since hamcrest tries to escape it otherwise: \\[\\w\\W\\]+ — without escaping the square brackets the result would be: \[\W\w\]+


0

Yes, this is fixed by this commit in JUnit 4.11: As pointed out by Steve Freeman of Hamcrest, the Matcher interface now has an additional method describeMismatch. To be safe to catch such improvements in the future, MatcherAssert is used instead of duplicating its implementation. Along with the upgrade to Hamcrest 1.3 (also in 4.11), these two ...


0

If you're using JUnit's org.junit.Assert#assertThat then upgrade to JUnit 4.11 to pick up a bug fix.


0

Let's consider this test: @Test public void test() throws Exception { List<MyType1> expected = ...; List<MyType2> actual = ...; assertThat(actual, containsUsingCustomMatcher(expected)); } You can use the following helper function (matchesUsingMyCustomMatcher is the same function as in your example). private ...


2

You can combine the IsCollectionWithSize and the OrderingComparison matcher: @Test public void test() throws Exception { Collection<String> collection = ...; assertThat(collection, hasSize(greaterThan(0))); } For collection = null you get java.lang.AssertionError: Expected: a collection with size a value greater than <0> but: ...


0

Empirically, I've found that this works instead: assertThat(foo, is(not(nullValue())));


0

As I posted in the comments, the logical equivalent of collection != null and size != 0 is size > 0, that implies the collection is not null. A simpler way to express size > 0 is there is an (arbitrary) element X in collection. Below a working code example. import static org.hamcrest.core.IsCollectionContaining.hasItem; import static ...


0

Press Ctrl+Shift+T to bring up the type search box. type org.hamcrest.Matchers This will show you all the locations on the project classpath that contains this class. You should see more than one entry under 'Matching items:', and you will find that they are different versions of hamcrest.


0

If you have the opportunity to use scala, scalaTest's fun suite has concise way of testing exceptions using intercept (http://www.scalatest.org/getting_started_with_fun_suite). It's as simple as test(a list get method catches exceptions){ intercept[IndexOutBoundsException]{ spyListObject.get(-1) } } You could potentially write your ...


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It can be used in non-test code. E.g. the LambdaJ library supports Hamcrest matchers: https://code.google.com/p/lambdaj/wiki/LambdajFeatures


4

It's is the almost the exact same thing. Recent versions of JUnit now include hamcrest. Infact org.junit.Assert.assertThat 's method signature is public static <T> void assertThat(T actual, org.hamcrest.Matcher<T> matcher) which you will notice uses hamcrest matchers. You may still want to include your own ...


0

Since versions are changing all the time, I'm posting to let people know that as of December 2, 2014, the instructions at http://www.javacodegeeks.com/2014/03/how-to-test-dependencies-in-a-maven-project-junit-mockito-hamcrest-assertj.html worked for me. I did not use AssertJ though, just these: <dependency> <groupId>junit</groupId> ...


0

I had the same problem as detailed here. I believe the problem comes down to the junit4 jar file. If, under eclipse pom editor, you look at the junit4 Hierarchy you will see that it has a dependency on hamcrest-core (i.e. hamcrest-core will, by default, be pulled in on compile). In my unit test code I use the hamcrest collection Matchers ...



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