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25

If I understand you correctly, you are probably getting the following exception: org.eclipse.swt.SWTError: No more handles You may be creating resources (such as Font, Image or GC objects) that you aren't correctly disposing. You might want to take a moment to read through the SWT guide on Managing Operating System Resources. To determine if this is ...


15

I did a deep googling and found this article. This article gave a link to download source code: I tried method in NtSystemInfoTest.cpp ( downloaded source code ) and it worked superbly. void ListHandles( DWORD processID, LPCTSTR lpFilter ) The code has following declaimer: // Written by Zoltan Csizmadia, zoltan_csizmadia@yahoo.com // For ...


13

I have tracked down a lot of issues with UIs not unloading as expected in WinForms. Here are some general hints: alot of the time, a control will stay in use because controls events are not properly removed (the tooltip provider caused us really large issues here) or the controls are not properly Disposed. use 'using' blocks around all modal dialogs to ...


12

Include the O_APPEND flag when opening the file. See the reference page for _open(). As this is C++ consider using an ofstream instead. These are type-safe and remove the requirement of having to specify the length of the arguments being written to the file: std::ofstream out(full_path, std::ios_base::app); if (out.is_open()) { out << ...


9

You can use Process.GetProcessById to get Process. Process has a lot of information about the running program. Process.ProcessName gives you the name, Process.MainModule.FileName gives you the name of the executable file.


8

Process.GetProcessById(id).ProcessName


7

I recommend using the Telerik Code Converter as a start. C# does not have that easy automatic attaching of event handlers by means of the "Handles" keyword like VB.NET does. //EventHandler declaration public event EventHandler DataLoaded; protected void Mag_Button_Load_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { //Raise Event if (DataLoaded != null) { ...


7

Simple enough to check: HANDLE h = 0; h = CreateMutex(NULL, TRUE, NULL); printf("%X\n", h); CloseHandle(h); h = 0; h = CreateMutex(NULL, TRUE, NULL); printf("%X\n", h); In my WinXP x64 this produced: 2E8 2E8 So there you have it. Unlike TCP ports, handles are recycled immediately. Repeat this experiment with your favorite API or any mix thereof.


7

Nope. You will have to wire up the event like this Menu1.MenuItemClick += Menu1_MenuItemClick;


6

Take a look at this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/j2JU6/256/ Html: <div id='elementResizable'> <h1>Full Name</h1> Title <div class="ui-resizable-handle ui-resizable-nw" id="nwgrip"></div> <div class="ui-resizable-handle ui-resizable-ne" id="negrip"></div> <div class="ui-resizable-handle ...


6

using in C#: using(MyDisposableType obj = new MyDisposableType()) { ... } is "syntactic sugar" (or short-hand notation) that is equivalent to MyDisposableType obj = new MyDisposableType(); try { ... } finally { obj.Dispose(); } as described in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us//library/yh598w02.aspx


5

You have some sort of resource leak in your program most likely. Use the following utility (http://www.eclipse.org/articles/swt-design-2/sleak.htm) as an easy way to find swt resource leaks. I used it to clean up a whole slew of problems in an rcp app I was working on


5

Compare it against the documented error return value. That means that you should compare it against INVALID_HANDLE, 0, -1, non-zero, or <=32 (I'm not kidding with the last one, see ShellExecute).


4

I know of two things that fit your description. Both were published in MSDN Mag a few years ago. GDI Leaks Leaks


4

Some systems may limit the number of file descriptors that a single process can have open simultaneously. 1024 is a common default, so if you need "thousands" open at once, you might want to err on the side of portability and design your application to use a smaller pool of open file descriptors.


4

Add a TActionList to your form. Add a TAction to it and handle its OnExecute event as you would the OnClick event of some other control. Assign the Action properties of the controls to refer to the action you added to the action list. (This also causes the controls to acquire their captions and enabled and visible properties from the associated action. It's ...


4

You need to call CloseHandle() on to_mem_h, not on the return value of MapViewOfFile() (See an example of using MapViewOfFile() here -- that example is calling UnmapViewOfFile() on the return value of MapViewOfFile() and is calling CloseHandle() on the first parameter to MapViewOfFile())


4

They are just abstract data types. According to MSDN, HANDLE and HWND are defined as: HANDLE is a handle to an object. HWND is a handle to a window. So, a HWND is a HANDLE, but not all HANDLEs are HWND. In fact: typedef void *PVOID; typedef PVOID HANDLE; typedef HANDLE HWND; Example You should only pass HWND to SetForegroundWindow unless you know ...


4

Should I have wrapped this in a using statement instead? Either that or put the main code in a try block and the Dispose in a finally block. using just implements the Dispose pattern safely with less code. using will put Dispose in a finally block so that the object is disposed even if an exception is thrown. The way you have it now, if an exception ...


3

There is some difference in exactly when the event handler is attached, and what is going on around it. For instance, when using WithEvents and Handles, the compiler will emit code that wraps access to the variable holding the instance that exposes the event in a property, and inside the property setter it will detach the event handler from the previous ...


3

Assuming that this window could be from any app produced from any kind of Win32-based runtime, it looks like you'll have to resort to p/invoke of the core Win32 apis for window operations. For example, you could use SetWindowPos, which can be imported from user32.dll. It's signature is this: BOOL SetWindowPos(HWND hWnd, HWND hWndInsertAfter, int X, ...


3

The Control.Invoke() method doesn't consume any handles. However, this code is clearly called from a thread. A Thread does consume handles, 5 of them. The Thread class doesn't have a Dispose() method, although it ought to have one. That was probably by design, it would be very difficult to call reliably, impossibly so for threadpool threads. The 5 ...


3

The command-line 'Handle' tool from Sysinternals does this, if you just want a tool. This won't help you if you're looking for a code solution, though.


3

Here is an example using ZwQueryProcessInformation from the DDK. The DDK is now known as the "WDK" and is available with MSDN. If you don't have MSDN, apparantly, you can also get it from here. I haven't tried it, I just googled your question. #include "ntdll.h" #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #include "ntddk.h" #define ...


3

You probably have the wrong mental image of a pipe. It has two ends, each represented by a different handle. Yes, CloseHandle has to be called twice to make the pipe instance disappear. But since they are different handles, that can never cause any problem. Also note that handle instances are process specific. Even if they have the same value in both ...


3

I recommend that you take a look at Storage.py in BitTorrent. It includes an implementation of a pool of file handles.


3

Can you access to the log configuration of this application. If you can, you should change the log level to "DEBUG". Tracing the DEBUG logs of a request could give you a usefull information about the contention point. If you can't, profiler tools are can help you : VisualVM (Free, and good product) Eclipse TPTP (Free, but more complicated than VisualVM) ...


3

I found out about Sleak, a great tool to debug SWT resources! Highly recommended for everyont with the same problems. Even shows the images for image resources!


3

Starting from a blank GUI and simply adding a pushbutton to it (tagged as 'btnTest'), the following code works fine: %% --- Executes on button press in btnTest. function btnTest_Callback(hObject, eventdata, handles) %[ changeName(handles); %] %% --- Inner function function [] = changeName(handles) %[ set(handles.btnTest, 'String', 'toto'); %] So ...


3

Yes. You can create an event handler and assign it to multiple controls. procedure TForm1.ThreeControlsClick(Sender: TObject); begin if Sender = Button1 then HandleButton1Click else if Sender = ComboBox1 then HandleComboBox1Click else if Sender = Edit1 then HandleEdit1Click; end; procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject); begin ...



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