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55

You can pass a query: param in the second argument to connect() on the client side which will be available on the server in the authorization method. I've just been testing it. On the client I have: var c = io.connect('http://216.157.91.131:8080/', { query: "foo=bar" }); On the server: io.set('authorization', function (handshakeData, cb) { ...


35

Root certificates issued by CAs are just self-signed certificates (which may in turn be used to issue intermediate CA certificates). They have not much special about them, except that they've managed to be imported by default in many browsers or OS trust anchors. While browsers and some tools are configured to look for the trusted CA certificates (some of ...


14

Why are you passing -cipher SRP-AES-256-CBC-SHA when connecting to graph.facebook.com? Facebook certainly doesn't support SRP: http://srp.stanford.edu/. Does it work if you don't pass that? Also, can you give the IP address that you're getting? With 69.171.229.17, I can reproduce that exact ClientHello (modulo the nonce and with RC4-SHA are the only cipher ...


13

This has now been changed in v1.0.0. See the migration docs basically, io.set('authorization', function (handshakeData, callback) { // make sure the handshake data looks good callback(null, true); // error first, 'authorized' boolean second }); becomes : io.use(function(socket, next) { var handshakeData = socket.request; // make sure the ...


12

If you set the openssl version in the protocol, it works: For the command line: curl -v -3 https://shumaker.flexrentalsolutions.com If in php: curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_SSLVERSION,3);


9

Bruno's answer was the correct one in the end. This is most easily controlled by the https.protocols system property. This is how you are able to control what the factory method returns. Set to "TLSv1" for example.


8

The client always sends so called HelloClient message first. It can be in SSL 2 format or SSL 3.0 format (the same format as in TLS 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2). And there is also possibility that SSL 3.0/TLS 1.0/1.1/1.2 clients send HelloClient with the older format (SSL 2), just with the higher version number in the data. So, detection of SSL 2 HelloClient is ...


7

The problem is socket.io v1.0.x revamped its transport layer. In 0.9.x, socket.io tries to establish a websocket connection firstly and fall back to polling if websocket is blocked, timeout, etc. So you can download a websocket configuration string like "sid:interval_time:timeout_time:..." from schema://addr:port/socket.io/1/. However, in v.1.0.x, the ...


6

It's not possible now, whether you use iOS 4 or any lower SDK version.


6

This is an (OpenSSL) bug that's still open. Details have been posted in this curl bug report. Further details was posted to OpenSSL-dev by "mancha".


6

Here is the solution, based on the HttpSnoop server example from the netty project. When setting up the client side pipeline, the ssl engine must be set as follows: public ChannelPipeline getPipeline() throws Exception { // Create a default pipeline implementation. ChannelPipeline pipeline = pipeline(); // Uncomment the following line if you ...


5

I sorted it out already - I was sending it when there was a connection, but this is before the handshake is sent of course. So I was doing: client connected send message receive handshake request send handshake response ... I just altered my code by firing the connect event of my library when the handshake is sent, which is when the WebSocket connection ...


5

It sounds like the intermediate certificate is missing. As of April 2006, all SSL certificates issued by VeriSign require the installation of an Intermediate CA Certificate. It could be that you don't have the entire certificate chain loaded on your server. Some businesses do not allow their computers to download additional certificates, causing a failure ...


5

This error is partially to do with handling the SMTP protocol. Looking at the RFC for Secure SMTP over TLS RFC 2487 there is an example client-server dialogue. S: <waits for connection on TCP port 25> C: <opens connection> S: 220 mail.imc.org SMTP service ready C: EHLO mail.ietf.org S: 250-mail.imc.org offers a warm hug of welcome S: 250 ...


5

It seems that in the debug log for Java 6 the request is send in SSLv2 format. main, WRITE: SSLv2 client hello message, length = 110 This is not mentioned as enabled by default in Java 7. Change the client to use SSLv3 and above to avoid such interoperability issues. Look for differences in JSSE providers in Java 7 and Java 6


5

1) When you send a message over a socket, you have no idea how many chunks it will be divided into. It may all get sent at once; or the first 3 letters may be sent, then the rest of the message; or the message may be split into 10 pieces. 2) Given 1) how is the server supposed to know when it has received all the chunks sent by the client? For instance, ...


4

Rehandshaking can be triggered by either side at any point during the connection. It doesn't really have anything directly to do with session resumption. So yes, if you want your application to be reliable, you should be prepared to handle both SSL_WANT_WRITE and SSL_WANT_READ no matter whether you are currently reading or writing.


4

The code link you posted is for the server-side of the handshake (there is a few places this will likely be used in Chrome such as remote debugging and as a proxy for extensions). If you really want use the new HyBi-07 protocol version you can try using this branch of web-socket-js that I made. Once Chrome switch to the new protocol, web-socket-js will ...


4

You are confusing bytes and characters. What the specification says is that you should send eight null bytes, not eight times the character "0" (which is chr(48)): message = (chr(19) + "BitTorrent protocol" + 8 * chr(0) + # <--- here self.getInfoHash(torrentCont) + self.peer_id) # in case of ...


4

I used text2pcap to load your capture into wireshark. If you enable TCP checksum validation and absolute sequence numbers, you will see a bad TCP checksum in your chip’s SYN-ACK packet. Also, the chip starting at absolute sequence number 0 is very weak.


4

I solved the problem today by reverting to an earlier version of socket.io on the server-side (an earlier version of the socket.io Node module). Perhaps the protocol changed? To do this: Delete the socket.io folder in your node_modules folder. On the console type: npm install socket.io@0.9.16 That should do it... it worked for me :) (obviously ...


4

accept() does not initiate a handshake, it merely returns the accepted socket. The handshake is initiated when you start performing I/O on the accepted socket. This is documented behavior: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/javax/net/ssl/SSLSocket.html The initial handshake on this connection can be initiated in one of three ways: ...


4

Peer refers to upstream in this case. Just because if we take that peer is a client, that would mean that two SSL handshakes (Client -> nginx, nginx -> upstream) happen simultaneously, which doesn't make sense - client have to establish connection and send a query, and only then nginx can choose appropriate upstream to connect to


3

That's because the ACK field means this when the ACK flag is set: Acknowledgment number (32 bits) – if the ACK flag is set then the value of this field is the next sequence number that the receiver is expecting. If it is not set to (inital sequence number+1), it would be inconsistently mean both ack'ing the SYN (both SYN and ACK flags must be set in ...


3

I could figure this out based on the implementation of the ClientHello.parse method in http://tlslite.cvs.sourceforge.net/viewvc/tlslite/tlslite/tlslite/messages.py?view=markup I am giving two solutions here in Python. IsSSlClientHandshakeSimple is a simple regexp, which can yield some false positives quite easily; IsSslClientHandshake is more complicated: ...


3

You should use a filter to eliminate the influence of the gravity, there is some sort of tutorial on the docs to do so. I did something similar, in my case I was also trying to detect other movements, so your task seems a bit simpler. I can post the code next monday (If I remember). Good luck! I'm editing the answer to add you can use a Sensor ...


3

no IV for cipher indicates that the cipher in use does not require an IV (RC4 is one such cipher, and likely the one chosen here). Edit Per GregS's comment, this a handshake_failure could be caused by the server requesting client authentication, and the client failing to provide a certificate.


3

In the end it turns out that the problem was related to the SNI extension in the JSSE client 1.7. The solution is to disable sending SNI records, before any access to an https location: System.setProperty ("jsse.enableSNIExtension", "false"); Many thanks to eckes for his solution (see SSL handshake alert: unrecognized_name error since upgrade to Java ...


3

Alright, I figured it out by myself... more by desperate testing and some luck, than successful research, which lead to nothing long enough. Instead of using the MAC-adresses and nonces as the strings they were, I had to unhexlify them. I used a2b_hex() #alternatively unhexlify() My final code looks somewhat like this, defs excluded: import ...


3

SSLv3 and TLSv1.x have a compatibility mode in case the client also supports v2 servers, as described in the TLS specification (Backward Compatibility With SSL). Some clients support this. For example Oracle/Sun Java has an SSLv2Hello pseudo-protocol, which uses SSLv2 Hello, but doesn't actually support SSLv2.



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