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4

If you want to see a list of all your mapped drives and their resolved paths: Console.WriteLine(String.Join(Environment.NewLine, GetUNCDrives().Select(kvp => string.Format("{0} => {1}", kvp.Key, kvp.Value)))); If you want to get a list of possible shorter resolutions for a path: var longPath = @"\\HarddiskVolume2\ent\RRPSTO\foobar\file....


3

I am looking for a solution to detect how's the write function access to the disk. Since your question mentions libc, we could assume that you are running under some operating system, and not on a "bare metal" system, in which case the answer is that write function doesn't access disk at all. It merely asks the OS to (eventually) write the data to disk.


3

Windows 10 update: There is now a sectorInfo sub-command which may provide better information: C:\>fsutil fsinfo sectorInfo C: LogicalBytesPerSector : 512 PhysicalBytesPerSectorForAtomicity : 4096 PhysicalBytesPerSectorForPerformance : 4096 ...


3

Windows and NTFS handle multiple concurrent sequential IO streams to the same disk terribly inefficiently. Probably, you are suffering from random IO. You need to schedule the IO yourself in bigger chunks. You might also see extreme fragmentation. In such cases NTFS sometimes allocates every Nth sector to each of the N files. It is hard to believe how bad ...


3

Your test is probably just reading and writing to the OS page cache. The small data size will fit in completely. The larger one won't but is getting flushed asynchronously by the OS. You should try using the OpenOptions.DSYNC and SYNC options.


3

You should first ask yourself, and explain here, why you need to flush. What you want to achieve is not necessarily what actually happens. If you actually want to optimize an application in such a way that a certain access pattern on a physical device results, then you make your solution very hardware dependent. What appears like an optimization on your ...


2

You need to benchmark, since it is operating system, file system and hardware specific. On my Linux system, many file operations are going thru the page cache, so if two programs (or the same program run twice) are accessing a file near the same time, the latest access might not involve any physical disk I/O. Linux and POSIX have even some system calls to ...


2

You should be able to do this. Get a second hard drive to install linux on (or use one that exists in the new PC), and put both in the new PC. Most linux distros will recognize the old hard drive's filesystem (I'm assuming it is a Windows PC with an NTFS filesystem). You will be able to access your old files and copy the data that you need. NOTE: Take care ...


2

To avoid this you can store reactive form data in MiniMongo on the client only and keep a Session variable with the _id of the document you are working with. Decide when you should save to the server based on your app requirements and at that point call a method to update the server collection with your client's minimongo data. With this model your client's ...


2

The answer is far simpler than all the above answers. The physical drive list is actually stored in a Registry key which also gives the device mapping. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\disk\Enum Count is the number of PhysicalDrive# and each numbered Registry Value is the corresponding physical drive. For example, Registry Value "0" is ...


2

I've found a hard disk activity monitor sample application written in VB.NET. It's fairly simple so you should have no problem converting it to c#. The idea is to use two Performance Counters, "Disk Read Bytes/sec" and "Disk Write Bytes/sec" for "LogicalDisk" ReadCounter = New PerformanceCounter("LogicalDisk", "Disk Read Bytes/sec", "_Total") ...


2

When you pass FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING then you are telling the system not to put the data in its disk cache. Then when you read the data, the system has to get the data from the disk. When you omit FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING, the system can put the data in its disk cache. And so when you read the data subsequently, it can be read directly from memory, which is ...


2

Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on ---------- ---------- -------- ---------- ---- ---------- rootfs 20026172 18985836 8 100% / /dev/root 20026172 18985836 8 100% / : /dev/md3 1902052420 539176 1804871560 1% /home You've filled up the root filesystem, not the drive. That's ...


2

The tools I'd think of: kpartx, partprobe, blkid, lshw; cfdisk and parted I think parted is geared to automation. lshw has xml output.


2

Parallelism (of any kind) only results in a speedup if you actually have the resources to solve the problem faster. Before thinking of optimizing your program, you should carefully analyze what's causing it to run (subjectively) slow - the bottleneck. While I know nothing about what sort bottleneck your program has, the fact that it writes a large quantity ...


2

Beside the required Pchar -> PAnsiChar fix, one problem that is easy to miss is System.Move('SCSIDISK', srbControl.Signature, 8); The string is passed in as a PChar to the move function. To fix it, I changed it to a typed const const kScsiDisk : AnsiString = 'SCSIDISK'; [...] System.Move(kScsiDisk , srbControl.Signature, 8); After fixing that, ...


1

I am answering my own question, as I ended up writing my own implementation. What I didn't like about the implementations of: Apache Commons IO Guava Springframework for moving files was that all of them first copy the directories and files and then delete them. (As far as I checked, September 2015) They all seem to be stuck with methods from JDK 1.6. ...


1

This is just an answer to the "what needs to happen to the filesystem" part of the question, not how to do it with Java. Even if you did want to call out to an external tool, Unix mv is not like Windows Explorer. Same-name directories don't merge. So you will need to implement that yourself, or find a library function that does. There is no single Unix ...


1

Your database should rock on either of those specs. Your entire database can fit in RAM and that will definitely make your web app/DB very responsive. Your database is really not large. 6 GB these days for a DB is small-to-medium size. I'd go the SSD right. If you can, go with RAID-1 for data protection.


1

Not sure about whether it is exactly 99% possible ect but when you delete a file off the file system the data isn't actually removed. The operating system just flags that section of the disk to to be overwritten when it needs to write to disk. Provided you or the system don't do anything that causes writes to happen to the disk before using a data recovery ...


1

Robocopy is your friend google it and have a look. It's a very powerful program by sysinternals (owned by Microsoft). Or if you want a nice GUI to go with it use SyncToy (https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/download/details.aspx?id=15155) which can be run with a batch file (including arguments) or made into a scheduled task.


1

Yes, it's totally normal that the OS may (or may not) actually be still writing to the disk after finishing writing within your programming API. That's literally not your concern, though. If you ask for the size you'll get the expected and correct size that you have written, even if your OS utilized a write cache. Those processes are abstracted by the OS for ...


1

If a program writes data to disk, there happen quite a lot of different things: First the data is written into a RAM buffer and the operation is acknowledged to the writing program way before the data is transfered to the next stages. Then data is written to the Harddisk controller which may do its own caching. Then data is written to the hard-drive ...


1

dd'ing a disk containing a mounted filesystem is doomed, the result will likely be corrupted. You might successfully copy a disk using this technique should you boot your server on a different medium (e.g. an installation CD.) However, unless you have access to some kind of ILOM, there is no way to do it without a physical access to the server. What I ...


1

I think you may be confusing physical, on-disk filesystems with network filesystems. HFS+ and NTFS are physical, on-disk layouts. Samba/NFS (Network File System)/AFP (Apple Filing Protocol) are network filesystems. There is nothing to stop you sharing an HFS+ physical filesystem via Samba (network filesystem) with Windows clients. Likewise, you could ...


1

This covers the basic differences: HDD: These are electromechanical drives with magnetic coated rotating disks (using a motor) and magnetic heads to read and write data. These disks are heavier, slower (seek time and rotational delay), uses more power, and causes vibrations. But they tend to have a longer life and are inexpensive as compared to SSD. SSD: ...


1

It would go like this: Open the drive for read/write, as root. (ex: /dev/sda) Mmap the drive (or you can seek and read/write) find the byte, modify the bits you want, flush and unmmap (or close). Someone else would probably provide the code version of this.


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When you attach a disk to an Azure VM a LUN (Logical Unit Number) must be associated with it. If you attach via the portal it may default this number, but the number must be unique to each disk. Values can be 0-15 because the max number of data disks you can attach is 16. Figuring out the LUN is the key to determining which drive is which. First, remote ...


1

$User = "user" $PWord = ConvertTo-SecureString -String "password" -AsPlainText -Force $Credential = New-Object -TypeName System.Management.Automation.PSCredential -ArgumentList $User, $PWord $net = $(New-Object -ComObject WScript.Network) $net.MapNetworkDrive("r:", "\\server\share")


1

I found this easy one liner worked in my case (little "out of the box" thinking ;) ) (Start-Process -FilePath "C:\windows\system32\NET.exe" -ArgumentList "USE I: \Server\Volume /USER:XXXXX password /persistent:yes" -Wait -Passthru).ExitCode And as an added bonus, you get an nice exitcode to report off of. Hope that helps.



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