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12

Sure, you can pass -DWHATEVER on the command line. Or -DWHATEVER_ELSE=NO, etc. Maybe for the paths you could do something like char MasterSkipFile[MAXSTR] = SOME_COMMAND_LINE_DEFINITION; and then pass -DSOME_COMMAND_LINE_DEFINITION="/home/whatever/directory/filename" on the command line.


5

One thing we used to do is have a generated .h file with these definitions, and generate it with a script. That helped us get rid of a lot of brittle #ifs and #ifdefs You need to be careful about what you put there, but machine-specific parameters are good candidates - this is how autoconf/automake work. EDIT: in your case, an example would be to use the ...


5

I'd say there's no such thing as Pythonic C++ code. The DRY principle applies in both languages, but much of what is considered "Pythonic" is simply the shortest, sweetest way of expressing logic in Python, using Python-specific constructs. Idiomatic C++ is quite different. lambda, for example, is sometimes not considered very Pythonic and reserved for ...


4

Platform specific configuration headers I'd have a system to generate the platform-specific configuration into a header that is used in all builds. The AutoConf name is 'config.h'; you can see 'platform.h' or 'porting.h' or 'port.h' or other variations on the theme. This file contains the information needed for the platform being built. You can generate ...


4

How about using properties file having content like product1=prod1 product2=prod2 and your method.. { //initializer Properties props = new Properties(); props.load(...); } String mapper(String productName) { props.getProperty(productName); }


3

Create a configuration file, and grant your web server write access to it. Then it's just a simple matter of writing a script which saves the DB config to this file. E.g. $fh = fopen('config.php', 'w'); fwrite($fh, chr(60) . "?php\n"); fwrite($fh, sprintf("define('DB_HOST', '%s');\n", addslashes($_POST['DB_HOST']))); fwrite($fh, sprintf("define('DB_USER', ...


3

Well you can use search and replace within Eclipse across all the files in your project, for one thing. You don't need to write that yourself. It doesn't look like the "Extract Constant" refactoring of Eclipse is willing to extract it across classes, unfortunately. That would obviously be the nicer solution.


3

My preferred way would be to have the build system do the OS detection. Complex cases you'd want to isolate the machine-specific stuff into a single source file, and have completely different source files for the different OSes. So in this case, you'd have a #include "OS_Specific.h" in that file. You put the different includes, and the definition of ...


3

Its much saner to use : #if SOMETHING .. from platform to platform, to avoid confusing broken preprocessors. However any modern compiler should effectively argue your case in the end. If you give more details on your platform, compiler and preprocessor you might receive a more concise answer. Conditional compilation, given the plethora of operating ...


3

You can create a base page that has this function, where you have // my logic add a call to an abstract method (load_page, for instance). Then subclass all of your other pages from this and override load_page from them, have it containing all the logic you need. This will keep all of these strings in one place, though I don't see why you would need to ...


3

unsafeWindow.alert=function() {}; works fine in select situations. But, if that really is the code on the page, then you will not be able to stop that alert using Greasemonkey. This is because that alert will fire during the page load and before the DOMContentLoaded event -- which is when Greasemonkey is fired. Load this GM script: // ==UserScript== // ...


2

If you use Scriptish then the following will always work: // ==UserScript== // @id alert-killer-test@erikvold.com // @name Overwrite Alert // @description Overwrites alert() // @include * // @run-at document-start // ==/UserScript== unsafeWindow.alert=function() {}; You can get the user script here.


2

I've seen build systems in which most of the source files started something off like this: #include PLATFORM_CONFIG #include BUILD_CONFIG and the compiler was kicked off with: cc -DPLATFORM_CONFIG="linuxconfig.h" -DBUILD_CONFIG="importonlyconfig.h" (this may need backslash escapes) this had the effect of letting you separate out the platform settings ...


2

You are correct: as written, the code is repetitive (and has no error checking). Each field that you read really requires you to take three or five steps, depending on the type of data being read: Read the field from the stream Ensure the read succeeded Parse the data (if necessary) Ensure the parse succeeded (if necessary) Copy the data into the target ...


2

I am interpreting you question as, "I have a list of model objects, and some have default values and some don't...where do I decide what to show?" I think the view layer is exactly where you wan't to handle this. Model objects just hold the data, and have some methods on them for manipulating the data. It is the job of the view to determine how to display ...


2

Keep the values in a config file. And make sure it is not accessible from the web. The easiest solution is to keep the values in a configuration array - the user enters the values, you generate an array from it, then file_put_contents("config.php", "<?php $config = " . var_export($config)). With this method whenever you need the config array, all you ...


2

Maybe storing your strings in a resource file would help. Example here. You could also think of inheriting that behavior from a base class.


2

It is better to put data into data files, and write your code to process those data files. There are multiple reasons: you alluded to one, that the data is more manageable this way (ie. it'll be more cleanly organized and easier to find). Another important benefit is that it makes the data easier to change. When working with others that makes a HUGE ...


2

As a loose rule, you should create a new class only when you want to represent behaviour, and control the parameters of this class with your data. In your case, you probably want one scenery class for your flowers, shrubs, walls and such things. You can then customise objects of this class by calling functions to set the bitmap(s), the animation speed. It ...


2

No it is not a Java bug. It is not possible to say what actually is causing this, but there is no chance it is a Java bug. If you explained the context better and showed us the code for the setUserValue method, we could possibly come up with plausible theories. (An SSCCE would be ideal, but I strongly suspect that you won't be able to code one that ...


2

Short answer: you can't. Once the software is on the user's disk, a sufficiently smart and determined user will be able to extract the secret data from it. For a longer answer, see "Storing secrets in software" on the security.SE blog.


2

I would definitely go the route of additional data. It would be way too expensive to extract the points on the go. Although you'll have some fun translating the points on the map to points on the screen.


2

You are most likely faster with separate variables. Why? The JVM optimizes your code at runtime to make it faster. It tracks the flow and values of each variable to learn how to optimize code. For example it might realize that a parameter to a method is never assigned and thus constant. But it does not do so for each element of an array. An array is just ...


2

Taking your questions one at a time: How should you refer to the entity group in the software? Hard-code the id, or the name? Refer to the entity groups in a way that makes your code the most readable. So, perhaps you use the name, or perhaps a constant that looks like the name but whose value is the id. Using a constant can avoid one join when you are ...


2

Make a xxx.properties file (ResourceBundle) with an entry: danoZip = C:/Users/Tinis/Downloads/dano.zip And do it indirect: ResourceBundle bundle = ResourceBundler.getBundle("xxx"); String danoZipPath = bundle.getString("danoZip"); File sfile = new File(danoZipPath); In this way you put the configuration of a hard-coded file in a ...


2

Store the password as a hash in a file. Then read it from the file. You can use any already built hashing that you like. This SO question has awesome info on how you can start hashing today: Suggestions for library to hash passwords in Java Also no need to save the file to the project, just make the path to your Desktop, for example.


1

I recommend watching this: RailsCast It mentions installing bootstrap like this: #commandline rails g bootstrap:install If it doesn't work after that then try adding this to your less file. #css NOT scss @import "twitter/bootstrap/bootstrap"; Remember, that gem is in less. Importing less files into your scss file will break.


1

I ran a trace with Sysinternals Process Explorer and it revealed that php_ldap was attempting to open the file C:\Apache24\%SYSCONFDIR%\ldap.conf, where %SYSCONFDIR% is interpreted literally and not expanded from the contents of an environment variable. I have Apache installed in C:\Apache24, but obviously the exact path will vary depending on the name of ...


1

A simple though not exactly elegant solution would be something like this inside your hardcoded menu: [[*id:eq=`link resource id`:then=`class="active"`]] Using the Wayfinder snippet would probably be easier as it does that by default, but I suppose you had your reasons to hardcode the menu.



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