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31

You should think of pointers as being addresses of virtual memory: modern operating systems place at least one layer of abstraction between physical memory and what you see as a pointer value. As for your final statement, you cannot make that assumption, even in a virtual memory address space. Pointer arithmetic is only valid within blocks of contiguous ...


16

Not at all. C++ is an abstraction over the code that your computer will perform. We see this abstraction leak in a few places (class member references requiring storage, for example) but in general you will be better off if you code to the abstraction and nothing else. Pointers are pointers. They point to things. Will they be implemented as memory ...


11

As many answers have already mentioned, they should not be thought of as memory addresses. Check out those answers and here to get an understanding of them. Addressing your last statement *p1 and *p2 have the property p2 = p1 + 1 or p1 = p2 + 1 if and only if they are adjacent in physical memory is only correct if p1 and p2 are of the same type, or ...


8

I'm one of the rendering software architects at a large VFX and animated feature studio with a proprietary renderer (not Pixar, though I was once the rendering software architect there as well, long, long ago). Almost all high-quality rendering for film (at all the big studios, with all the major renderers) is CPU only. There are a bunch of reasons why this ...


7

Assuming modern 80x86 hardware; things that won't cause persistent changes and/or damage include: changing anything that is reset when the computer is reset; including all contents of RAM, caches, the CPU's micro-code, etc. writing to the area that legacy ROMs are copied to RAM (the area from 0x000C0000 to 0x000FFFFF). Note that this is actually RAM, but ...


6

Your temporary fluctuation might be related to the page cache. I would not bother (the change is insignificant). See also http://www.linuxatemyram.com/ You might prefill the page cache, e.g. by running some wc Main_Prog before running ./Main_Prog And you probably still do have some other executable programs & processes on your Raspberry Pi (check with ...


5

Not everything in a "32-bit machine" has to be 32bit. The x87 style FPU hasn't been "32-bit" from its inception, which was a very long time before AMD64 was created. It was always capable of doing math on 80-bit extended doubles, and it used to be a separate chip, so no chance of using the main ALU at all. It's wider than the ALU yes, but it doesn't go ...


5

I did an application like that.. I did it using http://nwjs.io/ and the module in the comment: https://www.npmjs.com/package/printer, here is a working code with this module printing raw in the default printer a file: var printer = require('printer'); var fs = require('fs'); var info = fs.readFileSync('ticket.txt').toString(); function sendPrint() { ...


5

I think your first solution is clean. But you could also do assign mywire_shifted = mywire[shiftamount+8 +: 8]; This says starting from the LSB (shiftamount+8) return the next MSB(higher) 8 bits.


5

Absolutely right to think of pointers as memory addresses. That's what they are in ALL compilers that I have worked with - for a number of different processor architectures, manufactured by a number of different compiler producers. However, the compiler does some interesting magic, to help you along with the fact that normal memory addresses [in all modern ...


5

The operating system provides an abstraction of the physical machine to your program (i.e. your program runs in a virtual machine). Thus, your program does not have access to any physical resource of your computer, be it CPU time, memory, etc; it merely has to ask the OS for these resources. In the case of memory, your program works in a virtual address ...


5

You can use a loop. Assume you have the following array definition: type vector_array is array(natural range <>) of std_logic_vector(1 downto 0); signal vector : vector_array(0 to 8); signal vector_out : vector_array(0 to 8); You can then find the first "01" with the following example (and there are many ways to do it). This example takes vector ...


4

because at the hardware level memory is naturally organized into addressable chunks. Small chunks means that you can have fine grained things like 4 bit numbers; large chunks allow for more efficient operation (typically a CPU moves things around in 'chunks' or multiple thereof). IN particular larger addressable chunks make for bigger address spaces. If I ...


4

I think the short answer is no, motherboards aren't compatible with motherboard made for different architectures. The compiler and OS kernel abstracts the architectural difference, but the OS kernel itself had to be coded for each architecture. In particular, the part of the OS that are hardware specific is called the "driver" for that particular hardware, ...


4

This is more boasting and not a serious constraint. What most likely happened is that they ran some sort of benchmark on a machine and are now advertising that fact. Much more akin to "Look! We made it so you can even execute 20 million coroutines and 50 million context switches per second! Impressive, huh?" rather than "We have this technical ...


4

Time, as a metric, is really only useful in the context of change. Here you're looking for changes to occur through computation in a shorter amount of time, but perhaps ultimately the most significant kind of state change that can occur is within ourselves. Life is really just about experiencing time (which is ultimately about experiencing change), and it's ...


4

You can use godbolt.org, permalink: https://goo.gl/QmxbDe #include <algorithm> #include <cstdlib> int abs1(int a, int b) { return abs(a-b); } int abs2(int a, int b) { return std::max(a-b, b-a); } int abs3(int a, int b) { return a > b ? a - b : b - a; } int abs4(int a, int b) { return a == b ? a : (a > b ? a - b : b - a); } ...


4

I haven't understand all of your code. But, the problems seems to be, that you rely on the external oscillator on your FPGA board. If you use two boards, both oscillators will not run on exactly the same frequency. So, if you compensate for the phase shift right only once after startup, the clocks will desynchronize after some time. That's why it worked with ...


4

A synthesiser will infer a latch because this code behaves like a latch. It does not behave like a flip-flop. It's as simple as that. Think about how this code behaves: initially the value of a will be 'x. When rst is asserted low then a will become '0. a will then remain at '0 forever. The state of a therefore depends not only on the current state of the ...


3

Pre-PCI this was much more difficult, you needed a trick for each product, and even with that it was difficult to figure everything out. With usb and pci you can scan the busses to find a vendor and product id, from that you go into a product specific discovery (like the old days this can be difficult). Sometimes the details for that board are protected by ...


3

Obvious naming would be the right thing to use, as there's no "reserved" feature in C. You can use arrays of byte-sized integers to correctly pad to the right length: typedef volatile struct RegisterStruct { uint8_t BDH; uint8_t BDL; uint8_t IR; uint8_t __RESERVED[num_of_reserved_bytes]; // this area should not be accessed uint8_t ...


3

As mentioned on the first page of the operator's manual for the 68k Architecture, in your case a word is 16 bits and a long word is 32 bits. In an assembly language, a word is the CPU's natural working size. Each instruction, as well as addresses in memory, tend to be one word in length. Whereas a byte is always 8 bits, the size of a word depends on the ...


3

As with all performance related questions, there is only one real answer. You need to time it on your platform, on your use case. Different stl implementations could also implement those functions in different ways, and your CPU architecture in this case plays a big role as well. Measure it, and get your own conclusions. I bet you won't really notice any ...


3

Like other variables, pointer stores a data which can be an address of memory where other data is stored. So, pointer is a variable that have an address and may hold an address. Note that, it is not necessary that a pointer always holds an address. It may hold a non-address ID/handle etc. Therefore, saying pointer as an address is not a wise thing. ...


3

I think Lightness Races In Orbit had the right idea but poor terminology. What C pointers provide are the exact opposite of abstraction. An abstraction provides a mental model that's easy to understand and reason about, even if the hardware is more complex and difficult to understand our harder to reason about. C pointers are the opposite of that. They ...


3

Generating TRUE random numbers is actually a field of research on it's own. Basically you will need to gather information about some seemingly random natural phenomena via some kind of sensor. Hardware and software for the moment are deterministic so having the same input will always result in the same output. Gathering external sensor information can "...


3

If my webcam LED is off does it means 100% nobody is using it ? No. It does not. For example I have 2 brands of webcam (I think one is a copy of the other) and I can disable the LED through the camera's built in web API.


3

The function to_unsigned must be provided with a parameter specifying the width of the vector that you want it to produce. The function to_stdlogicvector is also not the correct thing to be using. Your line should look like this: temp <= std_logic_vector(to_unsigned(FrameCumulative, temp'length)); The function to_unsigned is a conversion function, it ...


3

std::gets has been removed in C++11 (See What is gets() equivalent in C11?) If you're building using C++11 flag (maybe with a g++ alias), you have to disable this line in systemc.h. Replace using std::gets; with #if defined(__cplusplus) && (__cplusplus < 201103L) using std::gets; #endif


2

On Unix-like OS, /sys/class/net/ contains the symlinks to the available interfaces on your machine and the MAC address of an interface is written in a file like /sys/class/net/eth0/address On windows, I guess you have to parse the output of an external command like ipconfig to pick up your desired information. A demo: use std::fs; use std::io::Read; use ...



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