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5

Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(...) SQL Server has no concept of UTF-8. Use UCS-2 (UTF-16) or ASCII. The encoding used must match what you'd pass to HASHBYTES. You can easily see that HASHBYTES will hash differently VARCHAR vs. NVARCHAR: select HASHBYTES('MD5', 'Foo') -- 0x1356C67D7AD1638D816BFB822DD2C25D select HASHBYTES('MD5', N'Foo') -- ...


5

Since you've indicated that you are using Ruby on Rails, you can take advantage of Active Support's Enumerable#sum method: def totals @data.sum {|_,v| v['totals'].to_i } end


4

In Rails 5, you can take some advantage of Enumerable#pluck h.values.pluck(:totals).map(&:to_i).sum


4

Use inject: def totals @data.inject(0) do |t, (_, v)| t + v['totals'].to_i end end


4

Use Enumerable sum def totals @data.sum { |_,v| v['totals'].to_i } end You can also have start value different from 0 def totals(start_value= 0) @data.sum(start_value) { |_,v| v['totals'].to_i } end


4

You need to close the hashref part in a @{} slice "cast". @{$hash{"key"}}{@subkeys} = @vals;


3

With a normal hash deleting the value and reinserting will give the same result as modifying it in place. The commit does not give any information about why he deletes it just that he copies the functionality from Mason 1. But if you look at the source of HTML::Mason::Lexer, you will find this comment: We need to untaint the component or else the ...


3

fHash = fHash.to_a.sort.to_h


3

It is not possible to enforce colocation in Spark but the method you use will minimize data movement. When PartitionerAwareUnionRDD is created input RDDs are analyzed to choose optimal output locations based on the number of records per location. See getPreferredLocations method for details.


3

Use Hash#fetch: def foo_method(config) foo = config.fetch(:foo) bar = config.fetch(:bar) qux = config.fetch(:qux, {}) end foo_method({}) #=> key not found: :foo (KeyError) foo_method({foo: 1}) #=> key not found: :bar (KeyError) foo_method({foo: 1, bar: 2}) #=> no error You can also pass a block to fetch that is called ...


3

Simply passing the hash will work. Like this: m = {data:{toggle:true}, class:"btn btn-success"} link_to 'Click Me', '/alu', m #=> <a data-toggle="true" class="btn btn-success" href="/alu">Click Me</a>


3

@data.map{ |_, v| v['totals'].to_i }.inject(:+) or even shorter: @data.map{ |_, v| v['totals'].to_i }.sum


3

No, it's the reshape that it is off: s = unicode2native('The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog','UTF-8'); K = java.security.MessageDigest.getInstance('MD5'); out = dec2hex(typecast(K.digest(s),'uint8')) 9E 10 7D 9D 37 2B B6 82 6B D8 1D 35 42 A4 19 D6 The correct reshape: reshape(out',1,[])


3

Remove single quotes, they are not needed. var newAnchor= "#ancla-" + anchor;


3

Assuming you know the substructure is under :children: def extract(sequence, key) sequence.flat_map do |hash| [hash[key], *extract(hash[:children] || [], key)] end end


2

You've been asked to compute the Hash-based Message Authentication Code (HMAC) with SHA256. For this you will want to use the HMACSHA256 class - the documentation also includes an example of how to implement this.


2

Here is one more way to do this: csv1.zip(csv2).collect{|v1, v2| v1.merge(v2) rescue v1 } We first combine the two arrays using zip csv1 = [1,2,{3 => :a},4] csv2 = [5,6,{7 => :b},8] t = csv1.zip(csv2) #=> [[1, 5], [2, 6], [{3=>:a}, {7=>:b}], [4, 8]] Next, we collect the result of merging two elements of the sub-arrays. However, since ...


2

This is one way. arr1 = [1,2,{ 3 => 'a' },4] arr2 = [5,6,{ 7 => 'b' },8] arr1.map do |e| case e when Hash then e.merge(arr2.select { |e| e.is_a? Hash }.first) else e end end #=> [1, 2, {3=>"a", 7=>"b"}, 4] When e #=> { 3 => 'a' } h2 = arr2.select { |e| e.is_a? Hash }.first #=> [{ 7 => 'b' }].first # { 7 ...


2

For a detailed walk-through that explains why you are seeing the differences, please see my answer to the following Question: TSQL md5 hash different to C# .NET md5 And for anyone who does not wish to compile and deploy this themselves, this function is available in the Free version of the SQL# library of SQLCLR functions, stored procedures, etc (which I ...


2

The store function comes from the module Storable (you can see full documentation for the module by typing perldoc Storable). It's counterpart is called retrieve. So in order to read back the contacts on the script start you can replace the line my %contact; while (){ with my %contact; eval { %contact = %{ retrieve "pb.txt" }; }; while (1) { The ...


2

Yes it's possible. You have wrong the quotes. $(document).ready(function() { var anchor = window.location.hash.substring(1); if(anchor!=""){ var newAnchor= "#anchor-" + anchor; $(newAnchor).trigger("click"); } });


2

There is no need for escaping a BCrypt hash, regarding SQL-injection. A BCrypt hash calculated by password_hash() is base64 encoded, it contains only "harmless" characters of this alphabet... ./0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz ...plus the & sign to separate the parameters. That said, it is still a good idea to use ...


2

Here's a way of doing it using case to differentiate between the various object types you'll encounter: def find_names(object, key_name) case (object) when Array object.flat_map do |e| find_names(e, key_name) end when Hash [ object[key_name] ] + find_names(object.values, key_name).compact end end


2

Heres a fast but brittle regex way of doing it def find_nested(arr, key) arr.to_s.scan(/#{key.to_sym}=>"([^"]+)/).flatten end


1

Try in this way: result = {} CSV.foreach('file.csv', skip_blanks: true) do |row| result[row[0].slice!(0..2)] = row end result.sort.to_h


1

First, please read Thomas Pornin's canonical answer to How to securely hash passwords. Then, note that Java 8 does have PBKDF2-HMAC-SHA-512 available now as PBKDF2WithHmacSHA512 - use that instead. SHA-512 in particular has 64-bit operations that reduce the advantage GPU based attackers have. Use more iterations than just 1024, as well - see what your ...


1

First, you should store salt with the hashed value. Next, when user trying to authenticate with some login and password you can use next scenario: Retrieve user data from database by Login (for example, GetUser(login)). User class should contains login, hashed password and salt. If there is no user with that login, then fail authentication. Else execute ...


1

You stored both the hash and the salt, right? Now when the user tries to log in, you can run your method again using the salt you stored, and the output of your method should match hash stored in your database.


1

In your case @user_profile.userprofile[:Email][0][:Type] should return your value. Because email = [{:type=>"Primary", :value=>"myemail@email.com"}] is array contains [0] element Hash. Note: Don't use capitalized key in hash.



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