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7

It's because hashCode for int[] is not overridden. There is no reason why two instances of int[] should have the same hashCode, even if the entries are the same. Try this: System.out.println(new int[] {1, 2}.hashCode()); System.out.println(new int[] {1, 2}.hashCode()); You will almost certainly see two different integers. A good way to use Objects.hash ...


7

When you add an element to a Set it gets stored in a Map internally where key is the object you pass in and value is set to null. Internally Map maintains an array (buckets) of linked list. These arrays can also be referred as buckets. The index of the bucket is evaluated using hashCode() method. In your case since hashCode() returns a constant value, all ...


7

You're running into trouble because your notion of equality is inconsistent. Specifically, it's not transitive, which the contract for .equals() requires. It is transitive: for any non-null reference values x, y, and z, if x.equals(y) returns true and y.equals(z) returns true, then x.equals(z) should return true. Under your definition, e1 equals e2 ...


5

If you decorate your ErrorCodes type with the System.Flags attribute then .ToString will format as a list of value names. [<System.Flags>] type ErrorCodes = ... let errors = ErrorCodes.InvalidInputError ||| ErrorCodes.UnknownError printfn "%O" errors


5

In code shown in your question: HashTable::HashTable(int buckets) { this->buckets = buckets; vector<Entry>* table = new vector<Entry>[buckets]; } you create a local variable table which is a pointer to vector<Entry> and then leak that memory. Then in HashTable::insert you try to access member variable table which is ...


4

Short version: Yes, you can use the append method of EqualsBuilder and HashCodeBuilder. Long version: The List.equals(Object) method compares all the elements on the list. See the javadoc Compares the specified object with this list for equality. Returns true if and only if the specified object is also a list, both lists have the same size, and all ...


4

Will the following work iff the trees are equal in both structure and content? root.hashCode() == otherRoot.hashCode() No, it would not work, because hash code equality is a one-way street: when objects are equal, hash codes must be equal. However, when objects are not equal, hash codes may or may not be equal. This makes sense once you apply a ...


4

I guess, you cannot write a consistent hashCode in your case, because your equals breaks the contract of Object.equals method, namely transitivity: It is transitive: for any non-null reference values x, y, and z, if x.equals(y) returns true and y.equals(z) returns true, then x.equals(z) should return true. Suppose you have this code: Employee a = new ...


4

The reason is your hashcode function: (int) (Math.random()%100); always returns 0. So all A elements always have the same hashcode. Therefore all A elements will be in the same bucket in the HashSet so since your equals will always return true. As soon as it finds an A in the same bucket (in this case always) it will return true that that A is alreay ...


4

Instead of trying to set a default value, you can print a default value when you encounter an undefined value by using the defined-or operator, // (works for Perl 5.10 and higher). In this example, when you print your hash elements, you either print the element, or if it is not defined, 0: use 5.010; say $hash{$x} // 0;


3

You can, but you'll be breaking the general contract of equals, and this will lead to weird bugs. Even if you don't think you're using the hash codes, any external code you pass the objects to might rely on them, even if it doesn't seem to be hash-based. If you're not going to give your objects a decent hash method, at least make it throw a runtime ...


3

If you only ever need to compare them for equality (or put them in a HashMap or HashSet which is effectively the same) you only need to implement equals and hashcode. If your objects have an implicit order and you indend to sort them (or put them in a TreeMap or TreeSet which is effectively sorting) then you must implement Comparable or provide a ...


3

A Set is composed of buckets to speed up searching. When new object is added to a Set, its hash is evaluated using object's hashCode() method. Then, based on that hash, the Set decides which bucket the object is to be stored in. Then, when you search for an object inside that Set (using for example contains() method), the hash is evaluated again, and then ...


2

You've inserted the zero width no-break space (U+FEFF) character at the beginning of your second string. That string is actually equal to the following string (no hidden unicode characters): "\ufeffsuccess" That means a and b are not equal and do not have the same hash code.


2

You should leave it as the hashCode of the string. This is for a couple of reasons: String.hashCode() will distribute the hash over more of the integer space better than just returning Integer.parseInt String will cache the hash code and prevent therefore you won't pay the cost of Integer.parseInt on each call to hashCode() The key assumption I'm ...


1

HashSet uses equals() on all objects with the same hash bucket to determine contains(). Because equals() is always true, it doesn't matter which bucket the new A matches, but all objects will be in the same bucket because (int)(Math.random() % 100) is always 0. Try changing your hash to: (int)(Math.random() * 100)


1

There is a similar question asked in SCJP Certification about the hashcode method: Q: 20 Which two statements are true about the hashCode method? (Choose two.) A. The hashCode method for a given class can be used to test for object equality and object inequality for that class. B. The hashCode method is used by the java.util.SortedSet ...


1

You could try: Objects.hash(field1, field2, Arrays.hashCode(array1), Arrays.hashCode(array2)); This is the same as creating one array that contains field1, field2, the contents of array1 and the contents of array2. Then computing Arrays.hashCode on this array.


1

Assuming you have a string s = "ab". s[0] is the first letter of s, meaning "a" and so on. For a string with length of n, the last index will be n-1. i.e. the length of s is 2, the last letter of s is s[1] which is "b". Every letter in the ABC.. has a numerical ascii value that you can see in the ascii table. The hash code for the string "ab" is ...


1

Just adding up the hashCode is not a really good idea. There are libraries out there (e.g. Project Lombok) which do this for you. Or you can simply request your IDE to generate one or you. For e.g. Eclipse has an option of generating the hashCode based on the fields in your class. To extrapolate a bit; let's assume you have the following hashCodes: ...


1

You are using: Two String#hashCode invocations, whose algorithm is debated - see here for an interesting thread You're adding the salary (as int!!) for the final part Finally and most importantly, use a seed: multiply each field by a prime and sum the results You can look at how your IDE auto-generates the hashcode to get a better idea. In Eclipse: ...


1

I believe both Apache Commons and auto-generated code by IDEs are based on guidelines by Joshua Block in his book Effective Java. In case you use an IDE such as Eclipse you can generate equals() and hashCode() automatically by choosing which fields you would like to include in the computation. Eclipse even let's you use your own custom equals() and ...


1

Not sure what Objects is, but your last hashCode() example needs to handle null, I would think something like: @Override public int hashCode() { int h = contents.hashCode(); if (leftChild != null) h = h* 31 + leftChild.hashCode(); if (rightChild != null) h = h * 31 + rightChild.hashCode(); return h; } I can see overflowing h if the tree is deep ...


1

I would simplify the code like this and write a short units test. Most likely this will take 2 - 3 entries to reproduce the problem which is most likely in code you haven't shown. public void insert(String word, Definition definition) { int hash = 0; // put everything in one bucket for now // hashFunction(word); if (table[hash] == null) ...


1

Your code to find the definitions is incorrect: it modifies the structure of the hashtable: table[hash] = table[hash].getNext(); this replaces the entry in a bucket by the next one, thus effectively removing the previous ones from the map. Since your insert code only ever adds one definition to an entry anyway, and since the same word can be added ...


1

Can I only implement equals() but not hashCode()? Yes You can . Because they are just to method from the parent class Object, So it actually your choice to implement or not to (together or individual.) All Java bibles say these two MUST be implemented together. If you are not using anything related to hashcode(as you said hash based container) it not ...


1

As long as is not mandatory to implement hashCode, whenever you implement equals, you MUST also implement hashCode If you fail to do so, you will end up with broken objects. Why? An object’s hashCode method must take the same fields into account as its equals method. By overriding the equals method, you’re declaring some objects as equal to other ...


1

You should consider when you will use the object. If for example in TreeMap and TreeSet, then you'll need Comparable. Also any case, when you will have to sort elements(especially sorted collections), implementing Comparable is mandatory. Overriding equals and hashcode will be needed in a very large amount of cases, most of them.


1

Comparable is typically used for ordering items (like sorting) and equals is used for checking if two items are equal. You could use comparable to check for equality but it doesn't have to be. From the docs, "It is strongly recommended (though not required) that natural orderings be consistent with equals"


1

As per the javadocs: This interface imposes a total ordering on the objects of each class that implements it. This ordering is referred to as the class's natural ordering, and the class's compareTo method is referred to as its natural comparison method. Lists (and arrays) of objects that implement this interface can be sorted automatically by ...



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