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5

First of all, there is no standard map implementation that I am aware of that provides entry level locking. But I think you can avoid the need for that. For example UPDATE ... corrected mistake ArrayList<String> tm = new ArrayList<String>(); ArrayList<String> old = map.putIfAbsent(k, tm); if (old != null) { tm = old; } synchronized (...


5

You'll need a new Map, since the keys and values in your example have different types. In Java 8 this can be done quite easily by creating a Stream of the entries of the original Map and using a toMap Collector to generate the new Map : Map<String,Integer> newMap = s.entrySet().stream() .collect(Collectors.toMap(Map.Entry::...


3

HashMap does not preserve the order of insertion. If you always want to retrieval of your data based on index values or their order of insertion, then I would suggest using a List implementation like an ArrayList which gurantees the order of insertion. You could create a wrapper object around your main data object and put them in the ArrayList and when ...


3

// store first map in (new) temporary map HashMap<Integer, String> tempMap = new HashMap<Integer, String>(hm); // clear first map and store pairs of hm2 hm.clear(); hm.putAll(hm2); // clear second map and store pairs of tempMap hm2.clear(); hm2.putAll(tempMap); // EDIT (hint from Palcente) // optional: null the tempMap afterwards tempMap = ...


2

The easiest solution is not to store the default value in the map. Rather use the default value on 'get' if a key is not present. int value = map.getOrDefault('A', 0); Note that getOrDefault was introduced in Java 8 but you can trivially create your own equivalent in earlier versions. If you really need the values in the map then your code is likely to ...


2

Notice the first line of your first var_dump: object(stdClass)#200 Because you're dealing with an object, you access its properties with ->. When you do: var_dump($group->max_question_display); The reason you see (int) in the output is that the var_dump function shows the value type, next to the value. To access the value, do $group->...


2

You'd need to call a second time get hash.get(/*key*/) // This will get you the inner HashMap (thus the Object you're talking about) .get(/*key*/); // This will get you a String object from the inner HashMap


2

Kindly remember just how a hash-table (in any language ...) actually works:   it consists of a (usually, prime) number of "buckets." The purpose of the hash-function is simply to convert any incoming key-value into a bucket-number.   (The worst-case scenario is always that 100% of the incoming keys wind-up in a single bucket, leaving you with "a ...


2

tmp can be used to swap references as below. HashMap<Integer, String> hm = new HashMap<Integer, String>(); HashMap<Integer, String> hm2 = new HashMap<Integer, String>(); hm.put(3, "Mobile"); hm.put(11, "Tab"); hm2.put(4, "PC"); hm2.put(1, "Laptop"); HashMap tmp = new ...


2

There is no efficient way to pull the i'th entry from a HashMap. Indeed the i'th entry from a HashMap is not even a well-defined concept, since the ordering of the entries in a HashMap is unspecified. (By contrast, the entries of a LinkedHashMap can be iterated in the order that the entries were inserted. Yet even for a LinkedHashMap there is no way to "...


2

HashMap is not intended to be used this way, because the order of entries is not guaranteed. You are better of using an ArrayList, or a LinkedHashMap if you really need the key->value structure.


1

If the key is same for all then you should map key to list of values: Map<String, List<String>> And then to update list of values mapped to a specific key: List<String> values = map.get(key); values.add("new"); map.put(key, values);


1

As the name, "hash map," implies, the underlying data-structure is a "hash table." Conceptually, it is a series of "buckets," and the key is "hashed" to determine which (one) bucket to look through to try to find that key. This is a very efficient data structure for looking for keys by value, but it has no concept of "order." Java has a very rich ...


1

If you don't know the key, then a HashMap is pretty useless! Use an ArrayList or similar instead. If your HashMap is really, really, really large (i.e. it doesn't fit in your avail. memory) then you can consider using something in the likes of: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/berkeleydb/overview/index-093405.html


1

As suggested by Eran, I write a simple demo to swap key and value of a hashmap with another hashmap. import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Map; class Swap { public static void main(String args[]) { HashMap<Integer, String> s = new HashMap<Integer, String>(); s.put(4, "Value1"); s.put(5, "Value2"); for ...


1

Yes you are right, java does pass by values but there are tricky situations: if you are using primitive data type: pass by value works fine. if you use Objects instead of primitive data type: pass by value works but for address of passing object. So it looks like passing reference. I know concept almost look like same but technically, it is pass by value. ...


1

The problem is that your NodeCoordinate class doesn't define equality in a way that the dictionary would use. You have a method like this: public bool Equals(NodeCoordinate coord) ... but you neither override IEquatable<NodeCoordinate> nor do you override Equals(object). Personally I'd suggest doing both - and implementing a simpler hash code that ...


1

You need equals and hashcode on the key class. This would be the class Participant in your case.


1

stdClass is an object. You cannot use an object with array syntax to access its properties, if the class does not implement ArrayAccess interface. As pointed out by @IbrahimLawal , var_dump outputs both the type and value. Just echoing $group->max_question_display will provide just the value echo $group->max_question_display; // 5 In Summary: You ...


1

To put items in a HashMap, the hashCode of the key needs to be calculated. If your strings are 8 - 10 chars, there is some calculation that needs to be done to map them onto 32 bit hashcodes. How large are your integer keys? If they are smaller than 100.000, there's only 5 chars to calculate the hashCode from, so that's a little bit faster. You also have a ...


1

If you need a blanket default value, you can use Map.defaultOrDefault() if you're using Java 8. If you're using an earlier version of Java, you can implement the logic yourself: Integer value = myMap.get(someChar); if (value == null) { value = 0; } If you need to set defaults for a specific set of keys, as implied in your example, you can initialize ...


1

The code in your question is quite confusing but if I take the question itself literally you are asking, "given a List<Map<String, String>> how do I get a List<String> representing all values in the maps for a given key?" If that is actually your question in spite of not matching your code, then here is an answer: List<Map<String, ...


1

Stream over the different maps, flatmap them into one. Then use Collectors#groupingBy to sort them via their different values (aaa, bbb, etc.). Then stream over the result of this again to create new Container objects with the summed values. Finally, use Collectors.toMap to create the map you need. If you have any question, don't hesitate. public static ...



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