Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

ArrayList has overloaded the toArray method. The first form, toArray(), will return an Object[] back. This isn't what you want, since you can't convert an Object[] into a String[]. The second form, toArray(T[] a) will return an array back that is typed with whatever array you pass into it. You need to use the second form here so that the array is ...


6

HashMaps find objects by their hash code. Part of the contract is that the key class must override hashCode() as well as equals(). The default hash codes for separate objects aren't equal, so the object isn't found by get. In contrast, when you loop over all entries, the hash code isn't used, so only equals is called, and the object is found. To find it ...


5

When iterating a Hashmap, there will be no guarantee about the iteration order. Now why is that? They're inserted not in order of when they occurred, but what value they hash to. For example, suppose that we have a hash function h(x) which returns 127 for the string "Hello", and 12 for "Zebra". If we enter those keys into our hash map, the order in ...


5

The Standard effectively mandates std::unordered_set and std::unordered_map implementations that use open hashing, which means an array of buckets, each of which holds the head of a logical (and typically actual) list. That requirement is subtle: it's a consequence of the default max load factor being 1.0 and the guarantee that the table will not be ...


5

You probably have another Map class in the same package which is not generic - this should be removed or renamed to something else


3

Suppose you have an Employee in your Map. Now suppose that Employee gets married and changes her last name. Now, the hashCode of that Employee changes. map.get() looks for that Employee in a different bin of the HashMap than the one it is located at (due to the hashCode change), and doesn't find it. Conclusion - you should use the Employee ID for both ...


3

Value of a Map can be modified. Also a key can be modified. Key needs to follow the condition that equals() and hashCode() before and after a modification will give the same results (with same input value in case of equals()). Also if keys can be modified generally they are unmodifiable. To better show why a key can be modifiable I add a little explanation ...


3

Arrays are stored in the map based on a hash that's calculated from the object itself and not based on the values contained within (the same behavior happens when using == and the equals method with arrays). Your key should be a collection that properly implements .equals and .hashCode rather than a plain array.


3

Every iteration, you modify the same List<IceCream> dailyIceCreamStock, so all keys in your Map point to the same list. You probably want to initialize and reference a new, deep-copy of your List at every iteration and put that in your Map instead, after the random mutations are performed.


3

You are adding the same List instance multiple times to the Map. You should create copies of the List in order to have distinct values in your Map : for (int i = 0; i < timeInterval; i++) { List<IceCream> copy = new ArrayList<>(dailyIceCreamStock); // create a copy for(IceCream iceCream: copy){ // modify the elements of the copy ...


2

Here you have two problems in your compare implementation. First, you compare boxed Double values with ==: else if(base.get(a) == base.get(b)) You should replace this with else if(base.get(a).equals(base.get(b))) Second, you check a.compareTo(b) for specific values like -1 and 1, but it may return any positive/negative numbers. It's better and simpler ...


2

addToMap creates a HashMap instance and assigns it to a local variable. It doesn't change the value of the sampleMap static variable. Java is a pass by value language. Therefore, when you pass a variable to a method, the method can't change the value of that variable. If the method assigns a new value to the variable, this assignment is local to the method, ...


2

Try the following code.I'm using treemap to maintain the order and then iterating to remove the elements. Map<Integer, String> map = new TreeMap<Integer, String>(); map.put(1, "a"); map.put(2, "b"); map.put(3, "c"); map.put(4, "w"); map.put(5, "x"); ArrayList<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>(); ...


2

I think the problem is not that 10G is in memory, but that you are creating too many HashMaps. Maybe you could clear the HashMap instead of re-creating it after you don't need it anymore. There seems to have been a similar problem in java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: GC overhead limit exceeded , it is also about HashMaps


2

I finally solved it. This is the right code in the jsp file: <tr> <s:iterator value="customer"> <s:iterator value="top"> <td><s:property value="value"/> </td> </s:iterator> </s:iterator> </tr> Thank you everybody for your help!


2

If your Person class overrides both hashCode and equals, so that p1.equals(p2) is true and p1.hashCode()==p2.hashCode(), you can't retrieve both "11" and "22" from the Map, since HashMap doesn't allow duplicate keys. Therefore m1.put(p2,"22"); will replace the "11" value with "22". In that case, both m1.get(p1) and m1.get(p2) will return "22". Also ...


2

hash_map<string, std::vector<int>> hm; hm.insert(make_pair("one", vector<int>{1,2,3})); // How do I insert values in both the vector as well as hash_map hm.insert(make_pair("three", vector<int>{4,5,6}));


2

You need to use the sorted map in the method. Change the type from void to Map<String, Customer and add return listCustomer; at the end. The original map is simply preserved unchanged in your current code. public Map<String, Customer> sortMapByName(Map<String, Customer> unsortMap) { ... return listCustomer; } If, for some reason, ...


1

When the string representation of the map is received on the client side, it becomes a plain old javascript object, and the keys are its fields. Their natural sort order is "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6". This is why it's displayed in that order. One way to display it the way you want is to convert it to an array of objects (the map values), and sort by ...


1

Part of the contract of hashCode says If two objects are equal according to the equals(Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce the same integer result. So, provided you don't have a case where two Employee objects have the same id, but different names, then you'll be fine. In fact, what you're proposing ...


1

When used in a ranged-based for loop an std::map will iterate using std::pair. And because there is no match for std::cout for an std::pair you get an error, so instead of using key_1 directly, try key_1.first to get key value of the map or key_1.second to get the mapped value of the map.


1

You can do the following: std::unordered_map<std::string, std::vector<int>> hm; hm.emplace("one", std::vector<int>{ 1, 2, 3 }); If you want to add to it later you can perform: hm["one"].push_back(4);


1

You need to override the equals method of Person also. When trying to retrieve the value hashcode will be used to calculate which bucket to search in, but then equals method will be used to check if the passed in key exactly matches the key against which the value is stored in. When working with hash based collections it's a must to override the equals and ...


1

Add a logic to check icount value and add value "0" if it is null or empty string. Example: String icounts = jobj.getString("icount"); Check like this: if(icounts!=null && icounts.trim().length() >0 ) { map.put("icount", jobj.getString("icount")); } else{ map.put("icount", "0"); } Hope this helps for you


1

First of all, a HashMap never keeps the orders of the Object which are put in it. So you need to use LinkedHashMap which maintains its insertion order. For removal of Object you need to make use of Iterator Map testMap = new LinkedHashMap<Integer, String>(); If your key is of any other type except Integer change it accordingly. So for your ...


1

Simply put, you're using too much memory. Since, as you said, your file is 10 GB, there is no way you're going to be able to fit it all into memory (unless, of course, you happen to have over 10 GB of RAM and have configured Java to use it). From what I can tell from your code and description of it, you're reading the entire file into memory and adding it ...


1

Java is always pass-by-value. You can't reassign a reference inside a method. That being said, there is no need to pass map to the adMap method. Just use the static sampleMap directly : private void addToMap(Long key, Long value) { if (sampleMap== null) { sampleMap= new HashMap<Long, Long>(); } sampleMap.put(key, value); } You ...


1

Note: I didnt test it. Map<String, ArrayList<String>> hashMap = new HashMap(); int checkpoint = 0; int i = 0; List<String> keys1 = new ArrayList<String>(); List<String> keys2 = new ArrayList<String>(); List<String> keys3 = new ArrayList<String>(); while(it.hasNext()) { line = it.nextLine(); if ...


1

If you're wanting to do this Server Side, I think you're looking for C# Dictionary class. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xfhwa508(v=vs.110).aspx In ASP.NET especially if this is for caching purposes you should probably be looking at using the ASP.NET Cache https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa478965.aspx


1

Store the lines before the checkpoint in a list. After the checkpoint, insert each line into the hashmap, using each item in the list as the key. ... boolean pastCheckpoint = false; int keyIndex = 0; // We will store keys in here List<String> keys = new ArrayList<String>(); while(it.hasNext()){ line = it.nextLine(); if ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible