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try to use JSONObject object = new JSONObject(industry); instead of JSONArray result = new JSONArray(data); Thie object.toString() is like {"Jobs":["Bar management","Baker","Bar service"],"lastUpdated":"Tue Jun 28 13:54:24 GMT+08:00 2016","CategoryName":"fulltime"} And the result.toString() is like [{"Jobs":["Bar management","Baker","Bar service"],"...


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The problem is the array that you store is JSONArray of HashMaps. When you retrieve the array, the objects in the array are strings(representing HashMap). JSONObject obj = new JSONObject((String) array.get(i)); which you are trying to convert to JSONObject.This is the problem. Either you convert each of this string back to hashmap or you can use JSONObject ...


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Hi You need more study about super and extends keyword in java and use of it in Generic with wild card. it play more important role in collection when inheritance come in collection if your code look like HashMap <String,Dog> dogMap = new HashMap<String,Dog>(); HashMap <String, Animals> animalMap = new HashMap<String,Animals>(); ...


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The rehashing is required because the calculation used when mapping a key value to a bucket is dependent on the total number of buckets. When the number of buckets changes (to increase capacity), the new mapping calculation may map a given key to a different bucket. In other words, lookups for some or all of the previous entries may fail to behave properly ...


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Because it makes hash table sparse, allowing elements to sit in their own buckets instead of piling up in small number of buckets. When several elements hit the same bucket, HashMap has to create a list (and sometimes even a tree) which is bad for both memory footprint and performance of elements retrieval. So, to prevent the number of such collisions, ...


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You have two nested operations here, merging the maps and merging the contained lists. First, I think trying to express the whole operation in one code block will become quite unreadable. Second, these List<myStruct>s are quite expensive to merge, especially if they tend to be large. So, one of these lists should be converted to a Map<String,Integer&...


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Use a map: private static Map<String, Consumer<Terminal>> activations = new HashMap<String, Consumer<Terminal>>() {{ put("Mail", Terminal::activateMails); put("Register", Terminal::activateRegisters); // etc }}; // similar for deactivate Then to use: public void doProcess() { activate.stream() .map(...


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The generic type parameters, like <Integer, String> add some compile-time checking. Otherwise, the HashMap can contain anything. Since the second map, HashMap hash=new HashMap(); has no type parameters, it passes the compiler check for void putAll(Map<? extends K,? extends V> m). Then, it can work well on runtime. However, the caller of the map ...


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Your HashMaps are not typesafe. The following will not compile anymore: HashMap<Integer, String> hashmap = new HashMap<Integer, String>(); hashmap.put(1, "milind"); hashmap.put(2, "nelay"); HashMap<String, Integer> hash = new HashMap<String, Integer>(); hash.put("piyush", 1); hashmap.putAll(hash); // will not ...


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Your hashmap actually did not specify the types for Key/Value, so the Object type (or sub types including Integer, String and whatsoever) is acceptable for both key and value. Here is your first line: HashMap hashmap=new HashMap(); If you change this line to: HashMap<Integer, String> hashmap=new HashMap<Integer, String>(); And continue ...


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This is part of a comment in the HashMap source: * Because TreeNodes are about twice the size of regular nodes, we * use them only when bins contain enough nodes to warrant use * (see TREEIFY_THRESHOLD). And when they become too small (due to * removal or resizing) they are converted back to plain bins. Looking down further, I see this: /** * The ...


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If I am correct in my understanding, you have a set of "terminals", and you want an object which when "activated" performs some method invocation/invocations on the terminals provided. The following should accomplish and demo that: import java.util.Arrays; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.HashSet; import java.util.Map; import java.util.Set; import ...


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As mentioned in the comments the problem is very likely the check curent.getSupplier() == nume. You are comparing for identity here and this is probably not what you want. Try changing this to curent.getSupplier().equals(nume) and see what happens. Furthermore there is no need to create a local copy of the products collection as you are not modifying this ...


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Rather than looking for a different data structure, think about different keys you could use that are unique. This is a very common problem in software development, as many concepts in the real world aren't as unique as we'd like. Names (not just of people but also places and things) are a classic example. While there are multiple potential solutions a ...


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I wrote something for my own work and hopefully it will work for you as well. import javax.swing.*; import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.Collection; import java.util.LinkedHashMap; import java.util.Set; public class LinkedHashMapListModel<K,V> extends AbstractListModel<V> { private LinkedHashMap<K, V> delegate = new ...


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You are checking if (convertView == null), but there is no else part for it i.e. when covertView is not equal to null. Try to put that, it will work.


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You could loop over the entries of map1 and then do the division by streaming of the value of the map. Check the code below SHORT CODE tmp is the resulting List<myStruct> tmp = e.getValue() .stream() .map(struct -> new myStruct(struct.time, map2.get(e.getKey()) .stream() ...


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You could get all keys of the object and then iterate over and return an array with new objects. var object = { mapUltimos2Anhos: { "La Coruña": 11, "Pamplona": 2, "León": 9, "Valencia": 4, "Las Palmas de Gran Canaria": 3, "Oviedo": 3, "Salamanca": 2, "Albacete": 3 } }, result = Object.keys(object.mapUltimos2Anhos).map(function (k) { ...


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You can cycle through your object using a for..in loop, then push objects to an array using it's keys and values: var hash = {"La Coruña":11,"Pamplona":2,"León":9,"Valencia":4,"Las Palmas de Gran Canaria":3,"Oviedo":3,"Salamanca":2,"Albacete":3} var arr = []; for (var prop in hash) { arr.push({'Ciudad': prop,'Clientes': hash[prop]}); } ...


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You can do something like this: Here is my struct class, with timestamp as String field (Don't know which data type used in actual example, this is just for reference) public class Mystruct { private String timeStamp; private int number; public Mystruct(String timeStamp,int number) { this.timeStamp=timeStamp; this.number=...


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Try this lv1.setOnItemClickListener(new OnItemClickListener() { @Override public void onItemClick(AdapterView<?> parent, View view, int position, long id) { String value = lv1.getItemAtPosition(position).toString(); //display value here Log.i("TAG","Position : " + position); } }); may helps you.


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I think you are asking about the HashMap class as implemented in Java 6, and (specifically) whether your idea for optimizing the internal transfer() method would work. The answer is No it won't. This transfer method is called when the main array has been resized, and its purpose is to transfer all existing hash entries to the correct hash chain in the ...


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HashMap does not use LinedList always, it uses array. For e.g. if a create a new hashmap object then array of size 16 is created. Each index contains 4 parts containing key,value,hashcode,next. LinedList is formed in index when collision(same hashcode) happens and this concept is called separate chaining. For e.g. if you put 2 objects in map object having ...


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The immediate problem you're not able to get the output 100:3 for case 3 is because you've not assigned enough 100's to withdraw 300, you've only deposited 200 line 10: (private int AMOUNT_OF_100 = 2;) Of course changing it to private int AMOUNT_OF_100 = 3; is not enough for the program to select 100s banknote before 20's because the data structure of Map....


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split_whitespace() doesn't give you two new Strings containing (copies of) the non-whitespace parts of the input. Instead you get two references into the memory managed by input, of type &str. So when you then try to clear input and read the next line of input into it, you try overwriting memory that's still being used by the hash map. Why does ...


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Error is only in XHTML page. I think datatable use only list type of data structure, you can not use MAP for datatable, better to use List, and form List from MAP, and than use. This question help you better. In java we have various way to get List of MAP. Displaying Hashmap keys and values in a primefaces DataTable Edited: you may need to learn how the ...


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import hashlib def getHash(name): m = hashlib.md5() m.update(name) return m.hexdigest()


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You can always use EL expressions to get any value that is in lopping. <c:forEach items="${images.holder}" var="e"> <div class="hex col-sm-6"> <img src="${e.value}"/> </div> </c:forEach> The code above will generate "X" divs where X is the length of the map. Let's assume your map ...


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I'm not sure I understand what should be the expected result at the end so let me just give you some inputs. To iterate over the entries of a Map and to get the value and the key of the current entry we proceed as next: <c:forEach var="entry" items="${myMap}"> Key: <c:out value="${entry.key}"/> Value: <c:out value="${entry.value}"/> &...


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So when you're making a hash table, it's just an array, and what a hashfunction does, is it takes an object, and based on the objects properties, it returns an integer mod (length of array). So don't worry about your floating point numbers! If you'd like a suggestion on how to implement it, here's what I would do. First, figure out about how long you want ...


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If you are using IntelliJ and set it to 7.0 properly in the following path and still didn't work: File -> Project Structure -> Project settings -> Project -> Project language level Set in the module: File -> Project Structure -> Project settings -> Modules -> Project language level


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JDK 1.7 already contains a MultiValuedMap having a signature like public interface MultivaluedMap<K,V> extends Map<K,List<V>>. I hope this helps.


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You can indeed use a Map<Key, List<Value>> but you have also Multimap in Google Guava that could be interesting too in your case with several implementations like ArrayListMultimap.


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Actually IN java there is no built-in collection for this type, but you can declare like Map<Key, List<YourClass>>. Even you can use Google's Guava collection library, where You can use MultiMaps. See this link for how to use it: https://dzone.com/articles/multimaps-google-guava


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Note: a marshal/unmarshal example for Map instance can be found here: Dynamic tag names with JAXB.


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I couldn't do it directly using HashMap.So, I sort HAshMap values and then added values to ArrayList and took final 2 values of the list as maximum 2 values.


2

If you don't want to rewrite the loop, you can just change your last line within the else block so you won't change content of map on every iteration: h.put(x,new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(sin))); You can also do it using Java 8 Streams which makes it much shorter: Map<Character, List<String>> map = list.stream().collect(...


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xlist is always the same list, even after you've put it in your hashmap. Whenever you hit a new letter, you clear every list in your hashmap, and add the current word to every list, because they're all the same list. I'd rewrite your loop as: for(String sin : list){ Character x =sin.charAt(0); if(!h.containsKey(x)){ h.put(x, new ArrayList&...


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The following should do the trick (use either version according to your needs): ECMAScript 6: function parseData(data, prefix) { let result = {}; data.forEach(o => { const key = `${o.yang_type}${o.name}`; result[key] = prefix ? `${prefix}/${key}` : '*'; if (o.children) { const newPrefix = prefix ? `${prefix}/${key}` : key; ...


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Yes. It is easily possible, just like returning any other object: public Map<String, String> mapTheThings(String keyWord, String certainValue) { Map<String, String> theThings = new HashMap<>(); //do things to get the Map built theThings.put(keyWord, certainValue); //or something similar return theThings; } Elsewhere, Map&...


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Your problems is not about your algorithm. This is because a Map does NOT accept duplicated keys. LinkedHashMap<String, Double> data = new LinkedHashMap<String, Double>(); data.put("c", 8.3); data.put("c", 6.3); // The second value replace the first one in the Map Note: Unrelated to the problem, but if you are using Java 8, you might ...


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The quick answer is // searching the first and second biggest value at once for (Map.Entry<String, Double> en : data.entrySet()) { if (max1 == null || en.getValue().compareTo(max1.getValue()) > 0) { max2= max1; max1 = en; } } However this fails if the first entry tested ...


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I have also gone through the same error but it was resolved just by changing in some properties of project. Right Click on your project --> Properties --> Select "Java Build Path" from Right hand side panel --> Select "Order and Export" tab --> Click on you JRE System Library or JDK Library --> Click on "Up" button and move it to first position --> Click Ok ...


3

Try the same thing that you would do if you wre doing this manually. set your current key and go through your list till you find different key and put the current key and appropriate value (that is the value with the same index) in your map public static void main (String [] args) throws IOException{ ArrayList<String> keys = new ArrayList<>()...


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you can write just like : package java7.demo; import java.util.*; public class MapTest { public static void main(String args[]){ ArrayList<String> keys = new ArrayList<>(); ArrayList<String> values = new ArrayList<>(); keys.add("1"); keys.add("1"); keys.add("1"); keys.add("2"); ...


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I think this will do it. public static void main(String[] args) { ArrayList<String> keys = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList("1", "1", "1", "2", "2", "3")); ArrayList<String> values = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList("2016-06-22 07:18:45", "2016-06-22 08:18:45", "2016-06-22 09:18:45", "2016-06-22 03:18:45", "2016-06-22 ...


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You can use the following approach. Values will be overwritten only when date is newer (I am assuming you are not changing the date format) Map<String,String> hashMap = new HashMap<>(); List<String> keys = new ArrayList<>(); List<String> values = new ArrayList<>(); if(keys.size() != values.size()) ...


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If you're not to use a hash function then constant time is more difficult. The easiest is if you can restrict the key to a sufficiently small set of integer values that you can simply use a directly indexed large array. Otherwise an N-ary tree with large enough N, compared to the number of possible keys, that the logarithmic behavior is essentially constant. ...


0

Buckets are basically a data structure that is being used in the Paging algorithm of the Operating System . To be in a very Laymans language. The objects representing a particular hashcode is being stored in that bucket.(basically you can consider the header of the linked list data structure to be the hashcode value which is represented in the terms of ...


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I hope this may help you to understand the implementation of hash map well.



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