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0

You can't conclude from these numbers whether the first run does two traversals, or one traversal in which each step takes more time and allocates more memory than the single traversal in the second run. In fact, it's the latter that is happening here. You can think of the two evaluations like this: in the second expression let t = replicate 9999999 'a' ...


0

here's the recursive version: gather xs = g 0 xs where g c [] = (c, []) g c ((_,ys):r) = (a, ys ++ b) where (a,b) = c `seq` g (c+1) r seq causes the immediate calculation of a counter as we advance along the list. Without it the calculation of c+1 might be delayed unnecessarily. This is guarded ...


0

Assuming that for each code there is only one product, you can encode the data as a list (string) of products. Let's pretend we have the following list of products and codes randomly generated from 9 products (or no product) and 10 codes. [(P6,C2), (P1,C4), (P2,C10), (P3,C9), (P3,C1), (P4,C7), (P6,C8), (P5,C3), (P1,C5)] If we sort them by code we ...


0

First let me get you a working version (I hope this is not homework): gather :: [(a,[b])] -> (Int, [b]) gather xs = (length xs, concatMap snd xs) now to your version: first you gave no signature but the two cases for gather already differ in the number of arguments (the first one would have type [()] -> [()], the second something like Int -> [a] ...


1

I can give you and idea-(as I am not that much acquainted with haskell). Take an array having 26 spaces. Now for each character in the first string you increase certaing position in array. If array A[26]={0,0,...0} Now if you find 'a' then put A[1]=A[1]+1; if 'b' then A[2]=A[2]+1; Now in case of 2nd string for each character you decrease the values ...


3

Strings are lists of characters in Haskell, so the standard sort simply works. > import Data.List > sort "hello" "ehllo" Your idea of sorting and then comparing sounds fine for checking anagrams.


1

I ran your code under gDebugger, and it made it plain: GL.matrixMode $= GL.Projection GL.loadIdentity GL.ortho2D 0 (realToFrac w) (realToFrac h) 0 This leftover piece of code was triggering an error state: Error-Code: GL_INVALID_OPERATION Error-Description: The specified operation is not allowed in the current state. The offending function is ...


0

Just ran into a similar issue, so I thought I'd document here what I did. I put my changes in a patch file. https://gist.github.com/ivanperez-keera/b398ce71a22e8a4849f3 cabal sandbox init cabal unpack SourceGraph wget ...


0

I consider the latter one to be hardly useful, because it can be flattened to (non-empty) lists, and the only difference is the branch structure. Which is still, however, hard to analyze at the runtime because no additional information is carried by internal nodes; and when you see a branch, you can't say anything about any of its two subtrees. To differ ...


4

As others have already pointed out, only a will be evaluated. Keep however in mind that to exploit laziness it is crucial that anotherFunction returns a tuple before evaluating its components. For example, consider anotherFunction n = if p > 1000 then (n, p) else (n, 0) where p = product [1..n] The above will always evaluate product [1..n], even if ...


0

Or, you can do it in a more imperative style: import Control.Monad main = do n <- readLn replicateM_ n $ do [x, y] <- (map read . words) `liftM` getLine print $ gcd x y


4

Unless there is a need to get the value of that variable, it will not evaluated. Basically Haskell is so lazy unless it is told not to be so. You can confirm this, like this Prelude> :set +m Prelude> let anotherFunction = (100, 1 `div` 0) Prelude| Prelude> let myFunction arg Prelude| | arg == 1 = a Prelude| | ...


15

In both cases, it won't evaluate anything unless the value is demanded. One way of demanding the value is calling the function in ghci (which prints the value in ghci and hence demanding it). Assuming that you are executing the function, then in your second case it will evaluate the tuple to weak head normal form (WHNF) and then evaluate the first element in ...


8

Well it is only interested in a, so that means that there is an implicit function: thea :: (a,b,c,d) -> a thea (a,_,_,_) = a In other words Haskell is not interested in the other elements of the tuple. Sometimes however the elements of the tuple share some structure. Say another function is defined as: anotherFunction :: Int -> (Int,Int,Int,Int) ...


2

Neither. That's just how it works; a package built with a library version as a dependency might get incompatible very quickly. The number of possible combinations is just too great. You have two options, basically: Use a sandbox Use Stackage


6

First, look at the source as well: ap m1 m2 = do { x1 <- m1; x2 <- m2; return (x1 x2) } -- Since many Applicative instances define (<*>) = ap, we -- cannot define ap = (<*>) You know (from the previous question) that the monad we are interested in is (->) [a]. Since we know from that comment that ap is the same as ...


6

The error message is saying that the type of left is Either[A, B] but the expected type of f is Either[A, List[B]]. You'll need to deconstruct Left in the case and then reconstruct it in the expression. It seems silly but you have the remember that the Left(x) in the branch is tagged with a different type from the one you want. | case Left(x) :: _ => ...


6

Simply pattern-match the tuple to extract the two pieces, operate on one of them, and then put it back together into a new tuple: deleteCandidate :: Int -> Cell -> Cell deleteCandidate cand (x, xs) = (x, delete cand xs) Alternatively, since (a,) has a Functor instance, you could write deleteCandidate :: Int -> Cell -> Cell deleteCandidate ...


2

You are pretty close. There is no reason to convert to a tuple or list of tuples before calling gcd. main = do contents <- getContents print $ map ((\[x,y] -> gcd (read x) (read y)) . words) . lines $ contents All the interesting stuff is between print and contents. lines will split the contents into lines. map (...) applies the function to ...


2

If you want it lazy, then your function needs to return values that look like this: instr1 : instr2 : ... : <thunk> Where <thunk> is the rest of the computation. To me, this suggests your function should look like: parse [] = [] parse (x:xs) = instr : parse xs where instr = ... I don't know whether you did it deliberately or not, but that ...


5

This answer is complementary to the ones already given, and focusses only on a part of the question: As far as I understand, it should be possible to implement <*> for lists only using fmap, as it is the case with applicative Maybe. How? You seem to refer to this implementation: instance Applicative Maybe where pure = Just Nothing ...


-2

Haskell is a lazy language meaning that it evaluates those lists upon request(when you want to use them) So zip needs to have both evaluated list so you should add application function $ zip $ listOfNths $ count


1

What if the string is not in the list? We should handle this situation appropriately. So this function will only possibly return the index of the string in the list. Based on this description, the signature for this function will be: strPos :: String -> [String] -> Maybe Int This function strPos will essentially check each item in the list for ...


3

If I understand you correctly, you can do this using a simple map: fn n xs = map (\x -> (everyf n $ drop x xs, x)) [0..n-1] If you insist on using a zip, then you have to evaluate the functions prior to zipping: fn n xs = zip (listOfNths n xs) (count n)


0

I didn't understand your question completely, however may be you need something like this: find_str :: [String] -> String -> Integer find_str list str = help_func list str 0 help_func [] str idx = -1 help_func (h:t) str idx | h == str = idx | otherwise = help_func t str (idx + 1) This function returns index of this string in ...


5

As mentioned in the comments, haskell does not allow one to implement generic functions for tuples of arbitrary size. Hence you need to implement a particular function for every size separately. Eg: toImplement3 :: (b0 -> c0, b1 -> c1, b2 -> c2) -> (b0, b1, b2) -> (c0, c1, c2) toImplement3 (f1, f2, f3) (a1, a2, a3) = (f1 a1, f2 a2, f3 a3)


1

Consider a being Word160 and f being (== w) . sha1 for a fixed word w :: Word160, where sha1 :: Word160 -> Word160 is some implementation of SHA-1. Then the predicate is true only for a very small number of inputs (most likely 1). If you had a fast way how to find matching values, you'd be constructing an inverse function to SHA-1, which would allow you ...


3

You can't really do this in general, since all you've given the function is that a is Enum and Bounded, which means you'd never be able to tell if the predicate even used == (not that you can do this anyway). Instead, you can write a custom data type that can be inspected before performing the filter: import Control.Applicative infixr 2 `Or` infixr 3 ...


5

You just made it - of course it's possible! Here's what I would make it: data Both a b = First a | Second b | Both a b Interestingly, this is a bifunctor: import Data.Bifunctor instance Bifunctor Both where bimap f _ (First a) = First (f a) bimap _ g (Second b) = Second (g b) bimap f g (Both a b) = Both (f a) (g b) As J. ...


9

Am I mistaken, or is this sugared monadic code based on >>= ? I don't know if >>= is actually used to de-sugar list comprehensions (but see Cirdec's answer for evidence that it's not), but it's actually completely legal to define <*> in terms of >>=. In mathematical terms, every Monad instance induces a unique corresponding ...


5

Are you looking for something like this: https://hackage.haskell.org/package/cpu-0.1.0/docs/System-Endian.html If you don't want/cannot use these packages, looking at the source code for the above, you can see how to check endianness on any platform with (almost) any lower-level programming language like C or similar. Fill a part of your stack (for a ...


17

No, this is not sugared monadic code based on >>=. If it were, the definition of >>= in the Monad [] instance would be circular. instance Monad [] where {-# INLINE (>>=) #-} xs >>= f = [y | x <- xs, y <- f x] ... The list comprehensions are syntactic sugar for let, if, and concatMap. From the Haskell ...


3

Putting together all the possible combinations from items in a list is the bind operator >>= for the Monad [] instance. Specialized for lists it has the type (>>=) :: [a] -> (a -> [b]) -> [b] For every item a in the list, it runs the function a -> [b] to figure out all the possibilities and collects those possibilities in the ...


10

There are lots of cases where the Applicative instance is satisfied by monadic functions, I've seen instance Applicative MyMonadThatIsAlreadyDefined where pure = return (<*>) = ap Also, <*> can't be written using only fmap, at least not in general. That's the point of <*>. Try writing <*> in terms of just fmap, I'll be ...


5

First, format your code: revRange :: (Char,Char) -> [Char] revRange t = unfoldr fun t fun t = (\b -> if b == (pred (fst t)) then Nothing else Just (b, pred b)) (snd t) Next, double check the type of unfoldr using Hoogle: unfoldr :: (b -> Maybe (a, b)) -> b -> [a] Next, add a type signature to fun so that ...


-1

Try to treat them as code in your query: data... They have a bit of a hint on this page: https://wiki.haskell.org/Non-trivial_type_synonyms Good luck!


0

While reading these answers with all the fancy functional programming, sorting and regexes and whatnot, I just thought: what's wrong a little bit of C? So here's a goofy looking little program. #include <stdio.h> int main (int argc, char *argv[]) { int i = -1, j, c; if (argc < 2) return 1; while (c = argv[1][++i]) for (j = 2; j ...


0

This code works fine use:- split "Your string" [] and replace ',' with any delimiter split [] t = [t] split (a:l) t = if a==',' then (t:split l []) else split l (t++[a])


4

aeson uses Text internally for string values, so if you use Data.Text.Encoding.encodeUtf8 you won't have the Text -> String -> ByteString conversion, it'll just go straight from Text -> ByteString (which iirc is fairly cheap)


1

First, I'd suggest to read Combining multiple states in StateT, just to see other available options. Since in the case of nested states we need to update values inside more complex objects, using lens can make life a lot easier (see also this tutorial). A value of type Lens' s a knows how to reach a particular value of type a inside s and how to modify it ...


6

(Collecting comments into an answer) Because in haskell, a String is a list of characters, i.e. [Char], just returning the input as given will do. example = id does what you want. Note that id is defined as id x = x Your example "jt5x=!" -> ["j","t","5","x","=","!"] does not match the description: Double quotes "" enclose Strings not single ...


0

i hope i dont totally make a fool out of myself, but consider this: I dont think that the Haskell version (original and improved by first answer) are equivalent with the C++ version. The reason is this: Both only consider every second element (in the prime function), while the C++ version scans every element (only i++ in the isPrime() function. When i fix ...


0

cabal install doesn't seem to work either. I think as long as ghci can find source modules, it won't look for a registered alternative. Even more curiously, I tried to copy *.{o,hi,dyn_o,dyn_hi} from dist/ to the right places in src/ (time stamp is younger than of the source file), and ghci still recompiled the modules. Am I making a stupid mistake?


5

The result is being cached in your lvl_r6yu. You can see that lst1 is [0..num] lifted out to the top level, and from $wlgo 0 lst1 it can be seen that the result of the summation is lifted out too. It's easier to see what's happening if we add the top level definition foo = mysum . lst, and then look at the core for foo. You can see there that foo is a ...


5

You could do that very much like in Haskell def printList(x: List1) = { x match { case Cons(hd, tl) => println(hd); printList(tl) case Nil => } } Your problem is that acc != Nil is not enough for the compiler to understand that acc is a Cons. head and tail are available on Cons only. Pattern matching is the normal way to go. ...


3

indeed they both have the same precedence (infixl 4: (<*>) and (<$>)) and you can just read it from left to right - (+) <$> (+3) <*> (*100) $ 5 = ((+) <$> (+3)) <*> (*100) $ 5 = (\ a b -> (a+3) + b) <*> (\ a -> a*100) $ 5 = (\ a -> (a+3) + (a*100)) $ 5 = 8 + 500 = 508 remember in this case we have f ...


2

<$> and <*> has same precedence and left associativity. $ has the lowest precedence of zero. You can use ghci to explore information about them: λ> :i (<$>) (<$>) :: Functor f => (a -> b) -> f a -> f b -- Defined in ‘Data.Functor’ infixl 4 <$> λ> :i (<*>) class Functor f => Applicative (f :: ...


3

As @PetrPudlák says, it depends. The former is better for search trees. However, the latter version is a (free) monad, which can also be useful: instance Monad Tree where return = Leaf Leaf x >>= f = f x Branch t1 t2 >>= f = Branch (t1 >>= f) (t2 >>= f) The (>>=) operator corresponds to "substitution at the ...


4

Note that n: is not correct. What you want to do is instead return [n] or n:[]. Also you can use pattern matching to check for the empty case: update1 :: Int->[Int]->[Int] update1 n [] = [n] update1 n (h:t) | n == h = update1 n t | otherwise = h : update1 n t


1

In the code fact 0 = 1 fact n = (*) n (fact (n - 1)) the last (*) ... is a tail call, as you observed. The last argument fact (n-1) however will build a thunk which is immediately demanded by (*). This leads to a non-tail call to fact. Recursively, this will consume the stack. TL;DR: the posted code performs a tail call, but (*) does not. (Also "the ...



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