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140

Why is it that you need to place columns you create yourself (for example "select 1 as number") after HAVING and not WHERE in MySQL? WHERE is applied before GROUP BY, HAVING is applied after (and can filter on aggregates). In general, you can reference aliases in neither of these clauses, but MySQL allows referencing SELECT level aliases in GROUP BY, ...


35

All answers upon didn't hit the key point. Assume we have a table: CREATE TABLE `table` ( `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, `value` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (`id`), KEY `value` (`value`) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 And have 10 columns with both id and value from 1 to 10: INSERT INTO `table`(`id`, `value`) VALUES ...


29

The main difference is that WHERE cannot be used on grouped item (such as SUM(number)) whereas HAVING can. The reason is the WHERE is done before the grouping and HAVING is done after the grouping is done.


25

You can only use aggregates for comparison in the HAVING clause: GROUP BY ... HAVING SUM(cash) > 500 The HAVING clause requires you to define a GROUP BY clause. To get the first row where the sum of all the previous cash is greater than a certain value, use: SELECT y.id, y.cash FROM (SELECT t.id, t.cash, (SELECT ...


16

HAVING is used to filter on aggregations in your GROUP BY. For example, to check for duplicate names: SELECT Name FROM Usernames GROUP BY Name HAVING COUNT(*) > 1


9

Use: SELECT t.person_id FROM TABLE t GROUP BY t.personid HAVING COUNT(t.personid) > 3 You can not use aggregate functions, or column aliases to derived columns using aggregate functions, in the WHERE clause. These can only be used in the HAVING clause, which requires defining a GROUP BY clause (if it doesn't already exist). I don't recommend ...


8

There are 2 questions asked here: The answer to the first of which is yes: The resultset of a HAVING-laden query is identical to the resultset of the same query executed as a subquery, decorated with a WHERE clause. The second question is about performance and expressivity - here we go heavily into implementation. On MySQL there is a thin red line, where ...


7

I figured out the problem. I replace CusotmProjections class, with: .add( Projections.sqlGroupProjection("ensayo_id", groupBy , alias, types)); where groupBy, alias and types are: String groupBy = "ensayo_id" + " having " + "count(*) = " + String.valueOf(lineas.size()); String[] alias = new String[1]; Alias[0] = "ensayo_id"; Type[] types = new ...


7

In Sql Server 2008 two similar queries have exactly the same execution plan: I've also studied a lot of queries generated by Entity Framework (with SS 2008) and so far I never saw a query with a HAVING clause. Grouping queries with a condition on an aggregated result are always translated into a query with a sub query. I trust the ADO.Net team knows with ...


6

HAVING specifies a search for something used in the SELECT statement. In other words. HAVING applies to groups. WHERE applies to rows.


6

Databases other than MySQL would give an error if you use a column that's not grouped without an aggregate. But MySQL will return the first value it encounters for the group. To retrieve all the rows in layout_plan groups with more than one row, you could use: select * from project_layout where layout_plan in ( select layout_plan ...


6

The WHERE clause filters data from the source before aggregates, whereas HAVING clause filters data after the GROUP BY has been applied. Generally this means any non-aggregate filter can appear in either place, but if you have a column that is not referenced in your query, you can only filter it in a WHERE clause. For example, if you have the following ...


6

You can use an aggregate function with a CASE: SELECT Date1, CC, BU, SUM(case when mode = '011' then Amount end) Mode011, SUM(case when mode = '012' then Amount end) Mode012, SUM(case when mode = '013' then Amount end) Mode013, SUM(case when mode = '014' then Amount end) Mode014 FROM MainTable GROUP BY CC,BU,Date1; Or you can use the PIVOT ...


5

GROUP BY avg(Grade) doesn't make any sense. The GROUP BY expression defines the groups that you want the aggregate applied to. Presumably you need GROUP BY ID, class


5

WHERE is for filtering query results based on condition. HAVING is for applying a filter on results of an aggregate function. In absence of aggregate function it functions same as WHERE. http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2007/07/04/sql-server-definition-comparison-and-difference-between-having-and-where-clause/


5

WHERE clause can be used with SELECT,INSERT,DELETE etc statement but the HAVING clause can only be used with SELECT statement. HAVING clause can only be used with GROUP BY clause In WHERE clause we can not use any agregate function directly


5

Without a group by, an aggregate like count works on the set as a whole. So this query returns either zero or one row: SELECT facility_map_listing_id FROM facility_map WHERE facility_map_facility_id IN(1, 2) HAVING count(DISTINCT facility_map_facility_id) >= 2 It will return one row if the having condition is met, and an empty set otherwise. Now, ...


5

SELECT color_id AS id, COUNT(color_id) AS count FROM products WHERE item_id = 1234 AND color_id IS NOT NULL GROUP BY color_id ORDER BY count DESC LIMIT 1; This will give you the color_id and the count on that color_id ordered by the count from greatest to least. I think this is what you want. for your edit... SELECT color_id, COUNT(*) FROM products ...


4

HAVING is used when you have a GROUP BY clause and you are trying to filter based on one of the grouping fields; WHERE is used for filtering otherwise. eg. select StudentName from students where Age > 20 select className, count(studentId) from classes group by className having count(studentId) > 10


4

HAVING is only for conditions involving aggregates used in conjunction with the GROUP BY clause. eg. COUNT, SUM, AVG, MAX, MIN. WHERE is for any non-aggregage conditions. They can even be used together in the same query. eg. SELECT t1.id, COUNT(*) FROM table1 AS t1 INNER JOIN table2 AS t2 ON t2.t1_id = t1.id WHERE t1.score > 50 GROUP BY t1.id ...


4

where is conditions on the select ... from having is conditions on the aggregate results from the group by ... So, looking at your example again: SELECT column_name, aggregate_function(column_name) FROM table_name WHERE column_name operator value GROUP BY column_name HAVING aggregate_function(column_name) operator value Here, WHERE column_name operator ...


4

You cannot have avg(Grade) under GROUP BY. In your example, you'd have to have: GROUP BY ID, class.


4

Management studio strips out the nulls (when you run it check the messages tab and you'll see the following ) Warning: Null value is eliminated by an aggregate or other SET operation. The coldfusion mssql driver does not. Using the isnull function is the best approach. Alternatively you can disable ansi warnings in your cfquery and re-enable them after ...


4

You can demonstrate whether or not the two queries in question are executed in the same fashion by SQL Server by viewing the Execution Plans. Take the following test code (I used SQL Server 2008): CREATE TABLE #TABLES ([ID] INT IDENTITY, [Name] VARCHAR(30)) INSERT INTO #TABLES VALUES('A') INSERT INTO #TABLES VALUES('A') INSERT INTO #TABLES VALUES('B') ...


4

I think this should explain things: If you omit group by, all the rows not excluded by the where clause return as a single group. So, basically, you are still using a group by...just by the entire set.


4

The HAVING clause is very useful to avoid the added complexity of sub-queries. However, the two are logically equivalent and every HAVING clause can be rewritten using a sub-query as you have. In case you're curious, you could also write every WHERE clause as a HAVING clause if you're prepared to take GROUP BY to the extreme.


4

Use a HAVING clause to filter your GROUP BY. SELECT id, title, COUNT(*) as subs_count FROM `blogs`, `subscribers` WHERE `blogs`.`id` = `subscribers`.`blog_id` GROUP BY `blog_id` HAVING COUNT(*) >= 2 ORDER BY subs_count DESC;


4

Like this: SELECT term, SUM(count) AS Totalwords FROM tablex GROUP BY term HAVING SUM(count) > 300 Update: Try this: SELECT docid, SUM(count) FROM tablex GROUP BY docid HAVING SUM(count) > 300; See it in action here: SQL Fiddle Demo.


4

New answer using Mongo aggregation framework After this question was asked and answered, 10gen released Mongodb version 2.2 with an aggregation framework. The new best way to do this query is: db.col.aggregate( [ { $group: { _id: { userId: "$userId", name: "$name" }, count: { $sum: 1 } } }, { $match: { count: { $gt: 1 } } }, { ...



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