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48

Ok I figured this out. For anyone else trying to do this you need: a) heading: your heading from the hardware compass. This is in degrees east of magnetic north b) bearing: the bearing from your location to the destination location. This is in degrees east of true north. myLocation.bearingTo(destLocation); c) declination: the difference between true ...


27

$all_rows = array(); $header = null; while ($row = fgetcsv($file)) { if ($header === null) { $header = $row; continue; } $all_rows[] = array_combine($header, $row); } print_r($all_rows);


20

PHP offers already 99,9% of what you need within SplFileObject, you add the missing 0,1% by extending from it. In the following example CSVFile extends from it: $csv = new CSVFile('../data/test.csv'); foreach ($csv as $line) { var_dump($line); } With your example data: array(3) { ["Make"]=> string(5) "Chevy" ["Model"]=> string(4) "1500" ...


12

@Damian - The idea is very good and I agree with answer, but when I used your code I had wrong values, so I wrote this on my own (somebody told the same in your comments). Counting heading with the declination is good, I think, but later I used something like that: heading = (bearing - heading) * -1; instead of Damian's code: heading = myBearing - (...


11

There are a few ways to calculate heading from the rotation matrix returned by CMDeviceMotion. This assumes you use the same definition of Apple's compass, where the +y direction (top of the iPhone) pointing due north returns a heading of 0, and rotating the iPhone to the right increases the heading, so East is 90, South is 180, and so forth. First, when ...


11

The iOS documentation states that the CMMagneticField data is raw, meaning that it includes bias introduced from the device itself and its surroundings. CMDeviceMotion provides the same magnetic field values filtered. To determine magnetic north you should use the filtered values and the device should lay level with Earth's surface. Knowing the x and y ...


8

I had time to play with this again. This will do it: - (void)viewDidLoad { [super viewDidLoad]; locationManager = [[CLLocationManager alloc] init]; locationManager.delegate = self; locationManager.desiredAccuracy = kCLLocationAccuracyBest; locationManager.distanceFilter = kCLDistanceFilterNone; [locationManager ...


6

You can do this with the \sectionrule command in the sectsty package.


6

Rewriting your command like this should do the trick: \newcommand{\tmpsection}[1]{} \let\tmpsection=\section \renewcommand{\section}[1]{\tmpsection{\underline{#1}}} This will evaluate to \section { \underline {#1} } which in turn produces underlined section headings :)


6

If p is your point, D is the distance, and θ is the heading-angle from the X-axis, pnew.x = pold.x + D * cos(θ) pnew.y = pold.y + D * sin(θ) Rather than storing distances and angles, though, this is usually done using vectors (which removes the need for the sin/cos)


5

1) Indeed geocode the postal address to a long/lat value, so you have the 'exact' location of the house. 2) Use streetViewService.getPanoramaByLocation to see if streetview is available, and the response will include the exact location where the streetview image was taken. Now you can calculate the heading between both points (1 being 'the house', and 2 ...


5

double hdgDiff (double h1, double h2) { // angle between two headings const double diff = fmod(h1 - h2 + 3600, 360); return diff <= 180 ? diff : 360 - diff; } bool isTurnCCW(double hdg, double newHdg) { // should a new heading turn left ie. CCW? const double diff = newHdg - hdg; // CCW = counter-clockwise ie. left return diff > 0 ? ...


4

Edit: I have changed my answer quite a bit... Basically you need to rotate the magnetic north vector in the opposite direction to the Magnetic Declination angle. The hard part is that you need to rotate the vector on a horizontal plane. For that you need to know the orientation of the phone. Here is what you need to do: Get the magnetic north vector. ...


4

You're looking for \texorpdfstring{texString}{pdfString}, which you can supply as an alternate to plaintext as an argument to \section. This should work: \section{\texorpdfstring{\color{Section1}Intro}{Intro}}


4

I've heard that the titlesec is more powerful than sectsty package, so I've just used it. You can put the horizontal line before the section header using: \usepackage{titlesec} \titleformat{\section}{\large\bfseries}{\thesection}{1em}{\hrule} or you can put it after, with the help of newcommand. See section 4.4 of the titlesec manual.


4

Set CLLocationManager headingFilter to kCLHeadingFilterNone or anything less than the default 1 degree.


3

You can use images / icons to represent vector points e.g. http://openlayers.org/dev/examples/vector-features.html Uses this png file You should then be able to rotate the point as in the other example. You can rotate to any angle: http://dev.openlayers.org/releases/OpenLayers-2.8/doc/apidocs/files/OpenLayers/Geometry/Point-js.html#OpenLayers.Geometry....


3

COLUMN commands take the column name only, not the fully qualified column name. core> column event heading "This will work" core> column v$session.event heading "This will not" core> select v$session.event from v$session where rownum=1; This will work ---------------------------------------------------------------- VKTM Logical Idle Wait (This ...


3

Here I describe how to get the orientation of the device with respect to the horizontal plane and the magnetic North. It is just 1 line of code to get the magnetic heading from the orientation (rotation matrix). Take the accelerometer and magnetometer readings a and m as 3 dimensional vectors. The a x m cross-product points to either East or West regardless ...


3

You might take a look at the LaTeX \rule command: \rule[raise-height]{width}{thickness} However, that's an inline (horizontal) command, so you'll have to use some trickery to get it at the right position and size (\noindent and \textwidth should help a little). Otherwise, you can use the following plain TeX \smallskip \hrule height 2pt \smallskip It ...


3

I believe that this is because you are creating a new document from scratch, and not basing your document on a template. I think the default styles come from your Normal.dotm template (in C:\Users\<userid>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Templates), and you need to base your document on this. What I have done is copy the template to the document file name ...


3

There's no concept of "heading" in a coordinate, only in a procession of coordinates generated as something moves, in which case the heading is calculated based on the differences between the coordinates. So if your first coordinate was at 10N50E and the second at 11N50E your device calculates you as traveling due north, thus on a northerly heading.


3

This is occurring because the h3 element cannot belong inside a p element. The end tag of a p element can be omitted if it is followed by certain elements: Tag omission The start tag is mandatory. The end tag may be omitted if the <p> element is immediately followed by an <address>, <article>, <aside>, <blockquote>, &...


3

The Default Styles for HTML5 as per the W3C spec can be found here Now, from the above spec, the default styling for the h1 and h2 tag is the following: h1 { margin-top: 0.67em; margin-bottom: 0.67em; font-size: 2.00em; font-weight: bold; } h2 { margin-top: 0.83em; margin-bottom: 0.83em; font-size: 1.50em; font-weight: bold; } So by default the h1 tag ...


2

Another way could be: \begin{center} \line(1,0){400} \end{center}


2

If you are using joomla default menu module then set start level to 0 and end level to 1 menu style should be "list" or "legacy vertical".


2

You need to add a Grouping on the primary key field for the sub-report. Then check the header and footer section. Then set the repeat = true for the header and footer section.


2

iOS 5 provides the designated method. Look for CMAttitudeReferenceFrameXTrueNorthZVertical in the developer documentation.


2

I would find the bearing from coordinate A to coordinate B and then use that bearing as an offset for the compass bearing from coordinate A to coordinate B. Here are two links for finding a bearing to a coordinate Calculating bearing between two CLLocationCoordinate2Ds http://shawnsbits.com/blog/2011/07/07/calculating-heading-with-corelocation/ If you ...


2

I'm no expert in map-reading / navigation and so on but surely 'directions' are absolute and not relative or in reality, they are relative to N or S which themselves are fixed/absolute. Example: Suppose an imaginary line drawn between you and your destination corresponds with 'absolute' SE (a bearing of 135 degrees relative to magnetic N). Now suppose your ...



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