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15

There's a very promising alternative to ZooKeeper called etcd (github.com/coreos/etcd), written by CoreOS team. Unlike Doozerd, etcd is being actively developed.


13

If you're using TCP sockets over an IP network, you can use the TCP protocol's keepalive feature, which will periodically check the socket to make sure the other end is still there. (This also has the advantage of keeping the forwarding record for your socket valid in any NAT routers between your client and your server.) Here's a TCP keepalive overview ...


12

I've looked extensively at Zookeeper/Curator, Eureka, etcd, and consul. Zookeeper/Curator and Eureka are in many ways the most polished and easiest to integrate if you are in the Java world. Etcd is pretty cool and very flexible, but It is really just a HA key store so you would have to write a lot of code to turn it into an opinionated service discovery ...


10

This is a great start. We've done a bunch of things like this recently so I can offer a few suggestions. Don't use thread pool for long running tasks. The thread pool is designed to run lots of tiny little tasks. If you're doing long running tasks, use a separate thread. If you starve the thread pool (use up all the tasks), everything that gets queued ...


9

Yes, there is also Doozerd (https://github.com/ha/doozerd). Take a good look at it, it's a nice, single binary distributed coordination service developed by Heroku. With bindings/libraries for java/python/ruby/node. Very easy to get started with and play around.


9

Are you using the latest version of socket.io, 0.9.1/0.9.1-1? If so, this is a known issue confirmed by Guillermo. The current recommendation is to roll back to 0.9.0 or 0.8.7 https://github.com/LearnBoost/socket.io/issues/777


8

I suppose in order to measure heartbeat you have 3 choices: 1. Use the camera as has been implemented in some applications already. I've tried one of these and it wasn't great! I don't know exactly how this would be implemented but I'm guessing that as blood is pumped through the body, the skin changes colour slightly. The camera would be able to detect ...


7

Heartbeat is a design pattern, this means it's a way of coding solutions. Here a technique is meant, where you keep sending requests to the server, so the server knows the user/browser is still present. There are several use-cases for this pattern, for example to prevent timeouts of sessions etc. You cannot really compare a design pattern to a function, ...


7

You missed to add the HeartbeatHandler in the ChannelPipeline. You need to add IdleStateHandler AND HeartbeatHandler to the ChannelPipeline to have it work.


7

Basically, there are two general approaches to thread communication: Shared memory Event/queue based In the shared memory approach, you might create a a synchronized list or a synchronized map that both threads may read from and write to. Typically there is some overhead to making sure reads and writes occur without conflicts, you don't want to have an ...


7

While the thread below is quite old, it shows that browsers allow multiple connections via XMLHttpRequest at any one time. How many concurrent AJAX (XmlHttpRequest) requests are allowed in popular browsers? If you have a long polling session either using an XMLHttpRequest or any other means of implementing comet, you can still create another request to the ...


7

Just discovered Accord (C) and OpenReplica/ConCoord (Python) which may be interesting solutions [EDIT] The Hashicorp crew, of Vagrant and Packer fame, are cooking "a decentralized solution for service discovery and orchestration" called Serf. [EDIT2] Hashicorp strikes again ! They just released Consul, built on top of Serf. The pitch: "a solution for ...


6

I think that I see what you're trying to do. There are a few exposed events that you can check here - list of Socket.io events - but there is no "heartbeat" event that you can tap into to fire at a set interval. You're on the right track with the second piece of code - setInterval(function() { socket.emit('heartbeat', someData); }, 5000); And on the ...


6

The couchdb -k should kill the background process and then couch should be restarted. However by default the restart feature is disabled. To enable it you should use -r parameter with value greater than 0. You can do it in bin/couchdb script - change RESPAWN_TIMEOUT from 0 to e.g. 5.


6

Instead of writing everything from scratch, you could choose to build your application using a framework that handles all of the scheduling and threading for you. The open-source library NCron is designed for exactly this purpose, and it is very easy to use. Define your job like this: class MyFirstJob : CronJob { public override void Execute() { ...


5

You have a couple of issues in this code segment that are creating your bugs: window.onload = show_data('Dev'); A bit of explanation about why window.onload = show_data('Dev'); doesn't work is probably in order: window.onload needs to be a function. As your code executes, it is evaluating show_data('Dev') (which doen't return a value, but does start an ...


5

Use setInterval(yourHearbeatFunction, 20000), it doesn't lock Javascript execution thread. So, longpolled request will be processed as soon as it comes.


5

Instead of using setInterval, call setTimeout() in the AJAX completion callback to start each call 10 seconds after the previous one finishes.


4

try setting another timeout from your ajax success function: function poll(){ setTimeout(function(){ $.ajax(.......).success(function(data){ poll(); //call your function again after successfully calling the first time. }); }),10000); }


4

The code is io.disable('heartbeats'); Tested successfully on socket.io v0.8.7 Without disabling debug - emitting heartbeat for client 299833185260419425 debug - websocket writing 2:: debug - set heartbeat timeout for client 299833185260419425 debug - got heartbeat packet debug - cleared heartbeat timeout for client 299833185260419425 debug - set ...


4

What is the best method for this, taking photos, recording video or looking at the live preview. I would think that live preview would be the right answer. Taking photos is not -- they will not happen anywhere near that quickly. Recording video and post-processing it would be possible, but I fail to see how this will be applicable for a real-time heart ...


3

Yes, this will automatically start a heart process that monitors your node. See the heart documentation. Update: Yes, Asymptote is correct. You also need a HEART_COMMAND environment variable to instruct heart of what to do when restarting the node.


3

Process.Close doesn't terminate the actual process. It has no effect on the process at all; it just releases the resources of the Process class (after which it is no longer usable, as you discovered) If your intention is to end the process, you must use another method such as Process.Kill or Process.CloseMainWindow. Process.Close has a different use; you ...


3

Is there any reason you can't use a Timer for this? There are three sorts you can use and I usually go for System.Timers.Timer. The following article discusses the differences though: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164015.aspx Essentially timers will allow you to set up a timer with a periodic interval and fire an event whenever that period ...


3

I found the answer in a combination of places. I took what Jeff Attwood did for stackoverlow here as well as the Code Project article and made something that is completely reusable and able to easily be hooked up using an IoC tool. I've posted the full details here


3

You can not really guarantee it. You could send the heartbeat in a different thread to prevent the time it takes to send the heartbeat being added to your delay. It may also be advisable to set the delay between two heartbeats to half the time the server uses to decide a client is dead, i.e. if your server times out your client after 15 seconds, (try to) ...


3

"K" is highly dependent on the specific traffic profile of the application (e.g. how often is application data transfered) and the application's tolerance for loss of connection (e.g. how quickly does the receiver need to detect the loss of connection). Unfortunately, low overhead and quick detection are opposing goals. It sounds like your trying to address ...


3

You can use this to quickly indentify the threads of your process: using System.Diagnostics; ProcessThreadCollection threads = Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads; Then you can use kernel32.dll with P/Invoke to do whatever you need with those threads. Use OpenThread to get a handle to the desired thread and then suspend it with SuspendThread using that ...


3

readRSSI reports the RSSI being averaged over an active connection. So if you have a connection to your sensor, reading RSSI doesn't cause any additional overhead. Even if you aren't exchanging user data, your BT devices are periodically communicating to keep synchronized with an active connection, and RSSI can be measured from this ongoing communication. ...


3

Someone at MIT Media Labs beat you to it :P http://www.cardiio.com/ Click on "How it works". I believe the gist of it was that the app measures the amount of light reflected off your face due to increase/decrease in blood. Based on this, they can determine your heart rate. Don't know about the underlying algorithm. If I know, I wouldn't be sitting here, ...



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