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If you use the qtSpim simulator (which I believe just uses Python so it should be relatively simple to install), then you don't need any extra conversion step. qtSpim should read all instructions and pseudo-instructions without complaint. You can get it here


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Mac OS X file system is implementing forks, so the larger one is likely having something specific stored in its resource fork. Use ls -l@ to get more details.


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print '\xfe' Python 2 code is roughly equivalent to this Python 3 code: sys.stdout.buffer.write(b'\xfe' + os.linesep.encode()) while print('\xfe') Python 3 code is roughly equivalent to this Python 3 code: sys.stdout.buffer.write((u'\xfe' + os.linesep).encode(sys.stdout.encoding)) In the first case Python prints bytes. In the second case, it prints ...


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The print(argument) converts the argument using str() (if neccessary) and then it calls file.write(string). The file is the optional argument of the print(), and it defaults to sys.stdout. It means that you should be able to do the same with sys.stdout.write(str(argument) + '\n'). So, the result depends on the used encoding that you can get from ...


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The byte-sequence C3 BE is the UTF-8 encoded representation of the character U+00FE. Python 2 handles strings as a sequence of bytes rather than characters. So '\xfe' is a str object containing one byte. In Python 3, strings are sequences of (Unicode) characters. So the code '\xfe' is a string containing one character. When you print the string, it ...



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