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209

Here's my standard .hgignore file for use with VS2008 that was originally modified from a Git ignore file: # Ignore file for Visual Studio 2008 # use glob syntax syntax: glob # Ignore Visual Studio 2008 files *.obj *.exe *.pdb *.user *.aps *.pch *.vspscc *_i.c *_p.c *.ncb *.suo *.tlb *.tlh *.bak *.cache *.ilk *.log *.lib *.sbr *.scc [Bb]in [Dd]ebug*/ obj/ ...


170

The new things are related to MSTest stuff. This is the one that I use: # use glob syntax syntax: glob *.obj *.pdb *.user *.aps *.pch *.vspscc *.vssscc *_i.c *_p.c *.ncb *.suo *.tlb *.tlh *.bak *.[Cc]ache *.ilk *.log *.lib *.sbr *.scc *.DotSettings [Bb]in [Dd]ebug*/** obj/ [Rr]elease*/** _ReSharper*/** NDependOut/** packages/** [Tt]humbs.db [Tt]est[Rr]...


141

Alternately: syntax: glob bin/**


85

You can add a path to a global or per-user ignore file in the [ui] section of your global/user hgrc or Mercurial.ini: [ui] ignore = ~/.hgignore On Windows: [ui] ignore = %USERPROFILE%\.hgignore


66

.hgignore does not need to be created before init It the config file will be used by others, you'd better commit the .hgignore so others dont have to create it, but this is not needed for mercurial to ignore your local files (see example) Yes .hgignore has to be in the root directory Simple example. Init the repo: $ mkdir test $ cd test $ hg init ...


61

hg status --all will list all the files in the tree, with a letter indicating its status: M for modified, C for clean (owned by hg), and I for ignored. For just ignored files, use hg status -i. For just files that will be added on the next commit, use hg status -a. These show only what you need to know and don't require scanning a long file list.


59

By pulling from this previous answer about Visual Studio 2010, from this response in this question, and this wonderful citation I compiled this listing: ############################################################ ## Visual Studio 2012 ############################################################ syntax: glob ## User-specific files *.suo *.user *.sln....


56

You might also check out the hg 'locate' command. I use it, along with the '-I' option when I want to limit the files to a certain directory. To list all files in your repository: hg locate From the repository ("root") directory: hg locate -I dir/sub_dir/dir_of_interest The path passed to -I needs to change depending on the directory in which you run ...


44

If the files you want to omit from the "hg commit" command are already "tracked", you should use the -X option. The pattern passed to -X is pretty flexible, making it possible to run for example: % hg stat A etc/foo.conf M src/bar.c M lib/libbar/loader.c % hg commit -X '**.conf' to avoid committing any file with a ".conf" extension, regardless of how ...


43

Try it without the slash after the caret in the regexp version. ^test/ Here's a test: ~$ mkdir hg-folder-ignore ~$ cd hg-folder-ignore ~/hg-folder-ignore$ echo '^test/' > .hgignore ~/hg-folder-ignore$ hg init ~/hg-folder-ignore$ mkdir test ~/hg-folder-ignore$ touch test/ignoreme ~/hg-folder-ignore$ mkdir -p srcProject/test/TestManager ~/hg-folder-...


42

I did some experiments and I found that the regex syntax on Windows applies to the path starting with the current repository, with backslashes transformed to slashes. So if your repository is in E:\Dev for example, hg status will apply the patterns against foo/bar/file1.c and such. Anchors apply to this path. So: Glob applies to path elements and is ...


41

This is what I was looking for. Add the following to the repo's .hg/hgrc: [ui] ignore = /path/to/repo/.hg/hgignore and create a new file .hg/hgignore beside it. This new file will be untracked, but work the same as the versioned .hgignore file for this specific working copy. (The /path/to/repo bit is unfortunate but necessary to make it work ...


40

The answer from Michael is a fine one, but another option is to just exclude: foo/bar/** and then manually add the .jar files. You can always add files that are excluded by an ignore rule and it overrides the ignore. You just have to remember to add any jars you create in the future.


37

This is specific to a C# project, but I ignore these files/directories: *.csproj.user /obj/* /bin/* *.ncb *.suo I have no problems running the code in the depot on other machines after I ignore all of these files. The easiest way to find out what you need to keep is to make a copy of the folder and start deleting things you think aren't ...


35

To do this, you'll need to use this regular expression: foo/bar/.+?\.(?!jar).+ Explanation You are telling it what to ignore, so this expression is searching for things you don't want. You look for any file whose name (including relative directory) includes (foo/bar/) You then look for any characters that precede a period ( .+?\. == match one or more ...


31

I feel that it is important to know every piece of information about my repositories, so I never copy and paste the .hgignore file from one repo to the next, instead I always build them as I go. This is easy with TortoiseHg, as the Commit window will list all untracked files, and a simple right-click will allow me to add patterns to ignore those files. This ...


28

Even if you have ignored files, Mercurial will track them once they have been added to the repository. To remove your config file from the repository, you can use hg remove -Af file.cfg This will remove the file from from the repository (once committed) without deleting your local file. See hg help remove However, there is now a delete recorded in the ...


28

You can include syntax: regexp at the beginning of .hgignore and then use perl regex syntax to root a directory by using ^. So just ^static should do the work.


27

That's a "feature" of Windows Explorer. Try to create your files from a command line (or from a batch/program you wrote) and it should work fine. Try this from a dos prompt: echo Hello there! > .hgignore


25

Try: syntax: regex ^media/.* or (leave it in the default glob and do) media/** and then manually hg add media/default.png. In mercurial (unlike in CVS) you can add files that match your ignore patterns and they work fine. So ignore broadly and hg add what you want tracked.


24

I feel left out of the conversation. Here's my .hgignore file. It covers C#, C++ and Visual Studio development in general, including COM stuff (type libraries), some final builder files, CodeRush, ReSharper, and Visual Studio project upgrades. It also has some ignores for modern (c.2015) web development. syntax: glob * - [Cc]opy * - [Cc]opy/ * - [Cc]opy (?)...


24

If you always want to ignore the file, you can add the -X option as a default for commit to your .hg/hgrc configuration file: [defaults] commit = -X program.conf


22

There is no mention in the .hgignore page of that file being inside .hg: The .hgignore file sits in the working directory, next to the .hg folder. And whatever file you want to ignore, you must be sure they are not already tracked. If they are, you need to remove them first, and then add them as private (non-tracked) file.


22

Using a file template is definitely the best solution. For example, if you have a database.ini file, commit a database.ini.template file and ignore database.ini in .hgignore


20

Traditionally, this is solved by not versioning the file itself, but by versioning a copy of it as a template for others to use. So you would hg mv tnsnames.ora tnsnames.ora-template, then commit, then do a straight filesystem copy of tnsnames.ora-template to tnsnames.ora, and add tnsnames.ora to the .hgignore file. Subsequent changes to the template will ...


19

hg manifest will list only the files in the repository, while hg status --all will list all the files in the repository's structure and include a marker for which are being tracked and which aren't.


18

Can't you just do this: hg add packages/repositories.config And then have this in your .hgignore file syntax: glob packages ?


18

The command hg status -i does exactly that.


17

You've got almost the right answer in the comments from gavinb, but the match was a little to broad. However, key concept about ignoring after the face was provided by RogerPage, again in a comment (what's with everyone preferring comments to answers?). Let's look at these nine files: dir.with.dots/file.with.dots dir.with.dots/filewithoutdots dir.with....


17

If you're just using glob syntax in your hgignore, then all you'd need to do is rename it, and it should just work. If you're using regex syntax then it's going to be a different story...



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