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You placed ContainedIn annotation incorrectly. According the Hibernate Search documentation: Be careful. Because the data is denormalized in the Lucene index when using the @IndexedEmbedded technique, Hibernate Search needs to be aware of any change in the Place object and any change in the Address object to keep the index up to date. To make sure the ...


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If you want to copy an existing entity - modify it - and save it as new entity, then you need to deep copy that object. You can do deep copy of a object by Serializing and then De-Serializing that object. Now this new object would just be a copy and will not have any reference to the original object. You can modify this new copy and insert again. Code to ...


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What is your JVM heap settings now ? How much data do you load from the DB? Try -Xms 512m -Xmx 1028m -XX:PermSize=128m -XX:MaxPermSize=512m


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You should try to replace the AliasToBeanResultTransformer in your code with this custom one: public class CategoryResultTransformer extends AliasToBeanResultTransformer { public static final String CID_ALIAS = "cid"; private int cidIndex = -1; public CategoryResultTransformer() { super(ProductResults.class); } @Override ...


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Try using Set instead of List for your @OneToMany relationship container


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Short answers for your questions: yes and no. Longer answers: Hibernate requires you to have a session open when you perform anything. You can use getCurrentSession() only if you actually have opened one. Why do you assume it creates a lot of overhead?


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As maestro's reply implies, the only portable solution is to convert this to use an entity and a one-to-many. That said, Hibernate has a non-spec feature called an "id bag" which allows you to map a basic or embeddable collection with an identifier for each row, thereby giving you the efficient updates you want: @Entity public class Person { ...


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http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Java_Persistence/ElementCollection#Primary_keys_in_CollectionTable The JPA 2.0 specification does not provide a way to define the Id in the Embeddable. However, to delete or update a element of the ElementCollection mapping, some unique key is normally required. Otherwise, on every update the JPA provider would need to ...


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If you are asking about some brain friendly materials for beginners try this youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yv2xctJxE-w PS. That is not a spam. This is not my channel.


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Why I should duplicate the physical information? And why Troop table doesn't contains troop_fk field (look at example above) Between two entities you can have multiple relationships, like: Organisation has multiple employees, and Organisation is lead by multiple employees. Only if a relationship is bilateral you can speak about owning and non-owning ...


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Using the @OrderBy annotation: @OrderBy("id")


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Below is my general understanding of this concept. I don't know if this corresponds 100% to Hibernate's or JPA's usage of it. When you have aggregation you have an entity (say Car) and it has a collections of entities of another type (say Seat). Or you have a Student and it has a collection of Course entities (the courses he has enrolled in). Now ...


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That's not setting the default value that you asked, but set one field with string "Not Provided" if one or more field is null. Is that right? the easiest way to understand is to modify your constructor and setter so you can filter it manually, something like this: public class YourTable { private String occupation; private String address; private ...


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I tried it using annotations. @Column(name = "colName", insertable=false, updatable = false, nullable = false, columnDefinition = "varchar(255) default '14-APR-1981'") or you can use @PrePersist annotation @PrePersist public void prePersist() { if(myProperty == null) //We set default value in case if the value is not set yet. myProperty = ...


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In a bidirectional relationship, one of the sides (and only one) has to be the owner: the owner is responsible for the association column(s) update. To declare a side as not responsible for the relationship, the attribute mappedBy is used. mappedBy refers to the property name of the association on the owner side. The join column annotation here is optional ...


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No, that's just not how it works. If you want the Field object to be the owner of the relationship, then the FIELD table will have to have to have a column for the VIEW_OPTIONS id.


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Even if you are setting the connection parameters (URL, username, passwords) programmatically you should make sure other conditions which would force the usage of JDBC connections at application startup are not present. I identified at least two: Setting the hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto property to any other value than "none" forces a connection to the DB at ...


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In these docs you can read the following: Note We recommend you to migrate from @org.hibernate.annotations.CollectionOfElements to the new @ElementCollection annotation. I would recommend you to change the annotation @CollectionOfElements to @ElementCollection and then go step by step through the above section. I think the problem is, that ...


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The code is correct, except that I just added @DynamicUpdate to avoid updating unmodified fields, and removed a line which was updating the table from another function.


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I think what you are looking for is support for mapping into a multimap, which is a map with one key and the value is a list of values all associated to the same key. This is not supported by Hibernate, this is a thread in their forum with an attempt to implement it. An alternative is to still map to a Set at the property level, and then provide a getter ...


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Have you tried using @JoinTable to link Item and Category? Category.java ... @OneoMany(cascade=CascadeType.ALL, fetch = FetchType.LAZY) @JoinTable( name="category_items", joinColumns={@JoinColumn(name="category", referencedColumnName="id")}, inverseJoinColumns={@JoinColumn(name="item", referencedColumnName="id")}) private Set<Items> items = ...


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<composite-id name="userPK" > <key-property name="businessUnit" column="BusinessUnit" type="string"/> <key-property name="userID" column="UserID" type="String"/> </composite-id> try with changing string to String


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Thanks for all the reply and your precious time. I have found my answer. i have build my query like this. createQuery("FROM PurchaseOrder po LEFT JOIN FETCH po.supplier sup WHERE sup.name=:supName").setString("supName",suplierName);


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use this in A Entity private List Bs = new ArrayList(0); @ManyToMany(cascade = CascadeType.REFRESH, fetch = FetchType.EAGER) @JoinTable(name = "AB", joinColumns = { @JoinColumn(name = "A", nullable = false, updatable = false) }, inverseJoinColumns = { @JoinColumn(name = "B", nullable = false, updatable = false) }) public List<B> getBs() { ...


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U use primary key of the table to do a session.get(), if the primary key of the table is not email id then you have to write a query/criteria/sql query to match the email password.


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Session.get() finds an entity by its primary key. To find entities via other means, you need to execute queries: LoginBean user = (LoginBean) session.createQuery("select lb from LoginBean lb where lb.email = :email") .setString("email", email) .uniqueResult(); Queries and JPQL are explained in the reference documentation. Read ...


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You have set the eventActions list to be the inverse mapping side of the relationship. This means it won't own the database updates for the eventActions. This is the normal setup, for when you don't need to store an index id, since the child objects in a one-to-many association will have a foreign key back to the parent, it makes most sense for them to own ...


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Loading both types of persons should not be a problem. If your query can access common attributes you can do FROM Person p WHERE <whatever_person_criteria_you_have>. If your query need to use specific attributes of Employee and SportsPerson then you could execute 2 queries and put the result into a single List<Person>. Sorting/displaying that ...


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A single property needs to be identified with the prop element, not props. Try <bean id="urlMapping" class="org.springframework.web.servlet.handler.SimpleUrlHandlerMapping"> <property name="mappings"> <props> <prop key="page.pdf">pdfController</prop> </props> </property> </bean>


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As per your code first let me know : - 1.Are you trying to created a table or you are trying to Insert the record in the table because after reviewing the code i can say you are inserting the record into the table. Hibernate Insertion : - When you are trying to insert any record in any table using hibernate the primary key is uniquely assigned by ...


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Do not set the ID by yourself. As you are currently hard coding the ID to 1, the second time it would fail. The below code will generate the ID automatically. @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO) @Column(name = "ID") private Long id;


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Try Query query=session.createQuery("select new fu.bar.PurchaseOrderDto(po.id, po.x, po.y, po.z) FROM PurchaseOrder po, Supplier sup WHERE po.supplier.id=sup.id AND sup.name=?"); or Query query=session.createQuery("FROM PurchaseOrder po WHERE po.supplier.id=sup.id AND sup.name=?"); As I said in my comment: If u are using HQL, you have to use the ...


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Assuming you have done all the mappings correctly, the query would be like this, List<PurchaseOrder> purchaseOrders; Session session = HibernateUtil.getSession(); Query query = session.createQuery("from PurchaseOrder po where po.supplierName = ?1"); query.setString(1, pass_your_supplier_name); purchaseOrders = query.list();


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I know this is old but it may help someone... I was trying to do the exact same thing - deleting from each main table to delete the referenced records first in the joined table and then delete the record from the main table. benzonico's post is valid but there is a more simple way to do this (without having to remove the records from the joined table ...



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