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3

Since you don't see any calls to the database, it's pretty safe to say that the cache is working. The reason you see different identity hashcodes is because EHCache doesn't store the objects as is. Rather it stores a serialized version, which it will deserialize when there's a cache hit. The deserialized version is a new object, hence the different ...


3

There are many things that might explain the difference. Also, not hitting the database might also mean that you are getting objects from the session cache (aka, first level cache). Make sure you create the object in one session and retrieve it twice in another session (the first might hit the database, the second shouldn't). The ideal would be to ask ...


3

Use @JoinColumn(updatable = false) instead of @Column(updatable = false).


3

As an alternative to an NtoOne mapping between Business and State you can map StateCodes as a secondary table of your Business entity so that state_name then appears as field of Business i.e. rather than business.stateCode.stateName you have business.stateName. This would look something like: @Entity @Table(name="Businesses") ...


2

LazyInitializationException comes when session is closed and you try to load lazy object from detached Object. Here team is detached object (As session might have closed before this call) and trying to load lazy object players. And About which approach need to use for this kind of problem, it is up to your requirement. if you call Hibernate.initialize on ...


2

I recommend to use the same versions that are used by Spring Boot. (I do not mean that you should use Spring-Boot, just use the same set of dependencies/versions). Spring Boot has some kind ob BOM-depencency, that contains the dependencies: <dependency> <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId> ...


2

Try writing the query like this: TypedQuery<UserActionPerUserResult> messagesQuery = entityManager.createQuery( "SELECT e from UserActionPerUserResult e JOIN FETCH e.emailMessages em WHERE e.id = 1 and e.userAction.id = 1", UserActionPerUserResult.class); List<UserActionPerUserResult> resultList = messagesQuery.getResultList(); The join is ...


2

The query you run from the console is easily cacheable and that's why the response is instantaneous. If you look at the query, you'll see that all parameters are embedded in the query, so the query planner can detect there's no variation and all executions will always go to the same plan and to the same cached result. The query that you run with Hibernate, ...


2

You're probably thinking that, because your slow query takes 60 seconds, your "fast" query taking 1 second is actually fast. This is not the case. This execution speed difference keeps you from understanding the actual problem here. An additional problem (probably not the actual problem) The very simple type of query that you're running should return ...


2

While it is possible to separate the salt from the calculated BCrypt hash, there is no reason to do this. BCrypt adds the salt in plain text to the resulting hash, so the verification function passwordEncoder.matches(...) can extract it from there. $2y$10$nOUIs5kJ7naTuTFkBy1veuK0kSxUFXfuaOKdOKf9xYT0KKIGSJwFa | | | | | | | ...


1

I found out more detail for what was requested a little bit ago, and based it on that. I changed up how I encoded the password, so now it is like this... String hashedPassword = BCrypt.hashpw(password, BCrypt.gensalt()); and then stored it in 2 separate places like this... employee.setPasswordSalt(BCrypt.gensalt()); ...


1

You can just remove the lesson object from set of studentLessons and hibernate will take care of deleting the record from the join table. Here is the sample code: Session session = sessionFactory().openSession(); session.beginTransaction(); Student s = (Student) session.get(Student.class, 1); System.out.println(s.getName()); ...


1

The most suitable bidirectional collection, is an ordered List: @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy = "parent", orphanRemoval = true) @OrderColumn("order_id") private List<Child> children = new ArrayList<>(); The order_id column will be used to sort elements upon retrieval and when you change the element order, Hibernate will issue ...


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Try something like this, to see if this stops Hibernate adding joins unnecessarily SELECT s FROM EntityA t JOIN t.start s ORDER BY s.name


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You cannot use a specific implementation of a Collection in a @OneToMany relation. You problematic part is private ArrayList<EmployeeBean> employeeList; You have to use private List<EmployeeBean> employeeList; Also note that a List also needs some kind of ordering criteria, therefore it is possible better to use a Set: private ...


1

The default fetch type for @OneToOne is FetchType.EAGER. Therefore, without any hints on how to optimise the query, Hibernate will follow these steps: Select all User's: Hibernate: select user0_.id as id1_1_, user0_.contact_details_id as contact_3_1_, user0_.name as name2_1_ from user user0_ Now eagerly load each User's ContactDetails ...


1

"select o from Osoba o " + "join o.zainteresowania z " + "where z.zainteresowanie in (:tags) " + "group by o " + "having count(z)=:tag_count"; This solved my problems.


1

Yes, that is perfectly normal situation. You just need two fields with different mappedBy`, one for each relation @OneToOne(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy = CustomEntity.ENTITY1, fetch = FetchType.LAZY) @Fetch(FetchMode.SELECT) public CustomEntity getCustomEntity() { return this.customEntity; } @OneToOne(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, ...


1

It is a bug in Spring: SPR-10395 - you should update it to version 3.2.3+



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