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9

From documentation on CONNECT_BY_ISCYCLE: The CONNECT_BY_ISCYCLE pseudocolumn returns 1 if the current row has a child which is also its ancestor and that on CYCLE: A row is considered to form a cycle if one of its ancestor rows has the same values for the cycle columns. In your example, row 2 does have a child which is also its ancestor, but its ...


7

Well, first of all, Postgres does not have hierarchical queries. No CONNECT BY, therefore also no LEVEL. You can do similar things with a recursive CTE and a level column that's incremented with every recursion. This query in Oracle: SELECT employee_id, last_name, manager_id, LEVEL FROM employees CONNECT BY PRIOR employee_id = manager_id; .. could be ...


5

PostgreSQL supports WITH-style hierarchical queries, but doesn't have any automatic cycle detection. This means that you need to write your own and the number of rows returned depends on the way you specify join conditions in the recursive part of the query. Both examples use an array if IDs (called all_ids) to detect loops: WITH recursive tr (id, ...


5

CONNECT BY PRIOR empno = manager_id; This will produce the recursion. All records that are part of the next lower hierarchical level will return. This will return a hierarchy from top to bottom for all managers and their respective under working subordinates. 30 (manager_id) 12 5 (manager_id) 1 7 20 (manager_id) 15 10


5

There is no way of doing this in MySQL. There are some nasty hacks listed in an article by Mike Hillyer which could be used in other databases as well. But using something as inelegant as the Nested Set model in Oracle just so the same code will run on MySQL seems perverse. The generic way would be CTE, as they are specified in SQL-99, and most flavours ...


4

I really doubt that you'll be able to get this functionality. I think that the best you can hope for is to be able to define a materialized view that optimises the hierarchical query, for example by basing the MV on an underlying table that is actually index-organised or hash clustered on the parent_id column.


4

You can start from the leaf and climb up: select p_n || ' - ' || n from t where p_n is not null start with n = 11 connect by prior p_n = n order by level desc Here is a sqlfiddle demo EDIT: OK, this makes things a little bit more complicated... You can climb up from both nodes but then you'll have to remove the duplicates paths (for example between ...


3

This could be one solution with tab as (select distinct category title, null parent from test union all select title, category from test) select lpad(' ', (level * 2 - 1), '-' ) || title as title from tab start with parent is null connect by prior title = parent; SqlFiddle


3

AFAIK: MySQL doesn't support recursive CTE's SQL Sever does not support cycle detection in recursive CTE's


3

There isn't a standardized plugin for doing this. I've looked more than once. However, there are a number of options. See from my earlier question on the same topic: What are the Options for Storing Hierarchical Data in a Relational Database? In short, if you're using a table with ID and ParentID (a.k.a. adjacency list) you use Common Table Expressions ...


3

Use a hierarchical query: SQL Fiddle Oracle 11g R2 Schema Setup: CREATE TABLE TREE ( p, ch ) AS SELECT 1, 2 FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 1, 3 FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 1, 4 FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 2, 5 FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 2, 6 FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 7, 8 FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 9, 10 FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 11, 12 ...


2

What you posted is a correlated subquery. Because there is no JOIN - steps 2 & 3 will be performed: 2) The CONNECT BY condition is evaluated. 3) Any remaining WHERE clause predicates are evaluated


2

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE descendant = @descendant AND hops < ( SELECT hops FROM mytable WHERE descendant = @descendant AND ancestor = @ancestor ) This will automatically take care of cases when @ancestor is not really a @descendant's ancestor. Create an index on ...


2

The query is recursive, it start from employee #1 (CEO probably) and the recursively prints all his subordinates and then all their subordinates and so on and so forth (until all the employees are printed). A good explanation about the "START WITH and CONNECT BY" can be found here


2

I think this is just an insignificant syntax difference. More specifically, I think this is a documentation bug. The syntax diagram for 8i implies that either order is supported. Nothing in the 8i reference implies the order makes any difference. But that diagram also kind of implies that you can have multiple group_by_clause or hierarchical_query, which ...


2

Look at the execution plans. In my environment they are identical, with a CONNECT BY operation feeding into a HASH GROUP BY. So it appears that placing the GROUP BY first is just an odd syntax that produces the same result as the more natural ordering. Technically, this is probably a bug in the parser, since as you say the spec indicates that the ...


2

It appears you were joining on the wrong field. -- create some test data DROP SCHEMA tmp CASCADE; CREATE SCHEMA tmp ; SET search_path=tmp; CREATE TABLE categories -- ( id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY ( categoryid SERIAL PRIMARY KEY , categoryparentid bigint REFERENCES categories(categoryid) , categoryname text -- , status integer DEFAULT 0 ...


2

Since Progress 4GL (actually ABL since a couple years) is a complete turing complete language you can. However perhaps not in a single query... This recursive example does it, you could do in a number of different ways. You can start with this code but you might need to have more error checks etc. DEFINE TEMP-TABLE ttPerson NO-UNDO FIELD PersonName ...


2

Try this query: SELECT CASE WHEN title IS NULL THEN category ELSE '- ' || title END category_title FROM ( SELECT title, category FROM table union all SELECT DISTINCT NULL title, category from table ) t ORDER BY category, title NULLS FIRST


2

Hierarchical data in SQL server can be obtained using FOR XML. In this case, you would just need to write a query to join tables, then parent-child relationships will manifest as nested XML elements: DECLARE @sites TABLE ( ID INT, Name VARCHAR(50) ) INSERT INTO @sites VALUES ( 1, 'abc' ), ( 2, 'def' ) DECLARE @siteEnergy TABLE ( SiteFK ...


2

I think, something like that should do the trick: SELECT * FROM (SELECT n.id, n.val, CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF isleaf FROM NODES n LEFT JOIN RELATION r ON n.id = r.id_child CONNECT BY PRIOR n.id = r.id_father START WITH r.id_father IS NULL) WHERE isleaf = 1 Oh, and by the way, you can get all leafs without even using hierahical query. Just select all ...


2

This is because || in MySQL is boolean OR, not string concatenation. To find all ancestors of a given Contribution, use: SELECT ca.* FROM Contribution с JOIN IntegerSeries s ON IntegerID < CHAR_LENGTH(c.path) AND SUBSTRING_INDEX(c.path, '.', IntegerID) <> SUBSTRING_INDEX(c.path, '.', IntegerID + 1) JOIN Contribution ca ON ...


2

DECLARE @Table TABLE( ID INT, ParentID INT, NAME VARCHAR(20) ) INSERT INTO @Table (ID,ParentID,[NAME]) SELECT 1, NULL, 'A' INSERT INTO @Table (ID,ParentID,[NAME]) SELECT 2, 1, 'B-1' INSERT INTO @Table (ID,ParentID,[NAME]) SELECT 3, 1, 'B-2' INSERT INTO @Table (ID,ParentID,[NAME]) SELECT 4, 2, 'C-1' INSERT INTO @Table (ID,ParentID,[NAME]) ...


2

The top level parent from CONNECT_BY_ROOT is based on your starting condition and the direction you're walking the tree. You're walking the tree backwards, so the 'root' is really your starting condition here. You actually have the information you want already, but in the A column, for the leaf nodes: select SYS_CONNECT_BY_PATH (a,'/') as path, a, b, ...


2

UPDATE 2: I rewrote the original recursive query so that all accumulation/aggregation is done outside the recursive part. It should perform better than the previous version of this answer. This is very much alike the answer from @a_horse_with_no_name for a similar question. WITH RECURSIVE search_graph(edge, from_node, to_node, length, area, ...


1

Use CONNECT_BY_ROOT to get the prnt_id from the root and CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF to indicate, wherever this is the leaf node. Something like that should work: SELECT PRNT_ID, CHILD_ID FROM (SELECT CONNECT_BY_ROOT PRNT_ID PRNT_ID, CHILD_ID, CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF leaf FROM TABLE CONNECT BY PRIOR CHILD_ID = PRNT_ID START WITH prnt_id NOT IN ...


1

select sys_connect_by_path(b,'=>') PATH1 from ( select least(a, b) a, greatest(a, b) b from aaa ) start with a = 0 connect by prior b = a UPD : select sys_connect_by_path(b, '=>') PATH1 from ( select a, b from aaa union all select b, a from aaa union all select null, 'Berlin' from dual ) start with ...


1

Use can create the XML in the SP directly Example declare @TopLevelItem table (TopID int, field1 varchar(50), field2 varchar(50)) declare @LowLevelItem table (TopID int, fieldA int, fieldB int) insert into @TopLevelItem values (1, 'a', 'b') insert into @LowLevelItem values (1, 1, 2) insert into @LowLevelItem values (1, 3, 4) select T.field1 as ...


1

If you need to split it explicitly, you can do that with parenthesis and inline views. select * from (select * from foo, bar where f1=b1 and (b2 = 1 or f1=b2 and b1=1 or f2=b1+1) and f1 is not null) connect by level < 10;


1

You should not use implicit joins, use explicit JOINs instead. Once you do that you can distinguish the "real" where condition from the join condition. It's not clear to me (and that is a result of using the implicit join syntax) what exactly you want to use as the join condition and what to use as the where condition. Rewrite your query to something ...



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