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6

The example below uses several techniques to create an RGB histogram of an arbitrary image: The Raster method getSamples() extracts the values of each color band from the BufferedImage. The HistogramDataset method addSeries() adds each band's counts to the dataset. A StandardXYBarPainter replaces the ChartFactory default, as shown here. A custom ...


5

The general way to get the second digit (even for cases when numbers can be greater than 99) is n / 10 % 10 Note that for -11 it will return -1. If you want 1, then do (n >= 0 ? n : -n) / 10 % 10


4

One possibility would be to use a 'hollow histogram', as described here: # assign your original plot object to a variable p1 <- ggplot(data = dat, aes(x = values, linetype = category, fill = category)) + geom_histogram(colour = 'black', position = 'identity', alpha = 0.4, binwidth = 0.4) + scale_fill_grey() # p1 # extract relevant variables from ...


4

You're so close! In your code above, ggplot is interpreting your fill as variables in your data set - factor darkgreen and factor firebrick - and doesn't have any way of knowing that those labels are colors, not, say, names of animal species. If you add scale_fill_identity() to the end of your plot, as below, it will interpret those strings as colors (the ...


3

I don't think you can explicitly set colors in aes; you need to do it in scale_fill_manual, as in the example below: ggplot(dist.x, aes(x = sim_con)) + geom_histogram(colour = "black", binwidth = .01,aes(fill=(sim_con==1.55))) + scale_fill_manual(values=c('TRUE'='darkgreen','FALSE'='firebrick')) + theme(legend.position="none")


3

Using the Chart2D library, the example below illustrates some alternative approaches. A ColorConvertOp is used to convert the sample image to grayscale, as shown here and here. Nested loops iterate over the pixels of the BufferedImage, invoking the getRGB() method to extract the value of each pixel; the corresponding counts are used to construct the ...


3

Just return the number divided by 10 i.e. int get_digit_2nd(int number) { if(number <= 0) return 0; return number / 10 ; // since your number is below 100. }


3

"I do not understand what in the world this histogram is displaying." Well, as you said: "Histogram showing total number of dice rolls for each possible value" The histogram: 2: ****** 3: **** 4: *** 5: ******** 6: ******************* 7: ************* 8: ************* 9: ************** 10: *********** 11: ***** 12: **** is a ...


2

It would be easiest to just add another column with the condition and update the aes to include the fill group. cust$high_rev <- as.factor((cust[,2]>100000)*1) ggplot(cust, aes(cust_rev, fill=high_rev)) + geom_histogram(color="black", binwidth=1/3) + scale_x_log10(labels=comma, breaks=powers(10,8)) + scale_y_continuous(labels=comma) + ...


2

plt.hist accepts additional keyword arguments that are passed to the constructor for matplotlib.patches.Patch. In particular you can pass an fc= argument which lets you set the patch facecolor using an (R, G, B, A) tuple when you create the histograms. Changing the alpha value of the facecolor does not affect the transparency of the edges: ax.hist(x, ...


2

Here's an approach to create a histogram together with a density curve in ggplot2. The data: dat <- scan(textConnection("30.90 31.00 32.75 32.65 32.50 31.60 31.80 30.70 31.20 28.10 29.50 28.60 31.70 33.10")) The plot: library(ggplot2) qplot(dat, binwidth = 1.0, geom = "histogram", xlab = "Data", ylab = "Frequency", y = ..density.., fill = ...


2

Use the xticks function: plt.xticks( arange(5), ('Tom', 'Dick', 'Harry', 'Sally', 'Sue') ) Complete example (by the way, your code doesn't work for me, but instead of your error, I get TypeError: len() of unsized object, so I'm histogramming manually here): import matplotlib.pyplot as plt listofnames = ['Al', 'Ca', 'Re', 'Ma', 'Al', 'Ma', 'Ma', 'Re', ...


2

You can modify the data fed into histogram using script. Here using the script , i am subtracting 2 from all the numbers used to created the buckets. { "aggs" : { "histoWithOffset" : { "histogram" : { "field" : "numberField", "script" : "_value - 2" } } ...


2

You probably want to use tryCatch for this. Something like the following should do the trick (though I can't test it since you don't provide any data). for(i in 1:ncol(d)) { tryCatch(hist(d[[i]], main=i), error=function(e) { tryCatch(barplot(d[[i]], main=i), error=function(e) { print('Error') }) }) }


2

I don't know what you have for data, but here's an mock example of how to make a histogram with months\days on x axis. I can only assume that you start with a list of datetime objects, but I can't figure out what nc is (is that matplotlib.date module?) or what kind of times can exactly be found in the unique times. So generally this is the approach. These ...


2

You could use the scikit-image library to perform Global and Local Histogram Equalization. Stealing with pride from the link, below is the snippet. The equalization is done with a disk shaped kernel (or footprint), but you could change this to a square, by setting kernel = np.ones((N,M)). import numpy as np import matplotlib import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ...


1

am = hist(dat, col="lightgreen", labels = TRUE, breaks=seq(min(dat)-2,max(dat)), axes=F) axis(2) axis(1,at=am$mids,seq(min(dat)-1,max(dat)))


1

Did you mean like this: hist(dat, col="lightgreen", labels = TRUE, xlim=c(0,10), ylim=c(0,27), breaks = 0:10, at=0:10)


1

import pandas as pd pd.Series(list(L)).value_counts()


1

First, I would recommend theme_set(theme_bw()) or theme_set(theme_classic()) (this sets the background to white, which makes it (much) easier to see shades of gray). Second, you could try something like scale_linetype_manual(values=c(1,3)) -- this won't completely eliminate the artifacts you're unhappy about, but it might make them a little less prominent ...


1

std::vector<int> computeColumnHistogram(const cv::Mat& in) { std::vector<int> histogram(in.cols,0); //Create a zeroed histogram of the necessary size for (int y = 0; y < in.rows; y++) { p_row = in.ptr(y); ///Get a pointer to the y-th row of the image for (int x = 0; x < in.cols; x++) histogram[x] += p_row[x]; ...


1

From your comment, I'm guessing your data table is actually much longer, and you want to see the distribution of name server counts (whatever count is here). I think you should just be able to do this: df.hist(column="count") And you'll get what you want. IF that is what you want. pandas has decent documentation for all of it's functions though, and ...


1

Adding such a parameter to density would be statistically unwise for the reasons articulated by @MrFlick. If you want to convert a density estimate to be on the same scale as the observations, you can multiply by the length of the vector used for the density calculation. The density then becomes a "per x unit" estimate of "frequency". Compare the two plots: ...


1

You can either fit the data that you get from a histogram using one of several ways: Use numpy.polufit for polynomial fits Use scipy.optimize.curve_fit for fitting arbitrary functions There is also kernel density approximation: scipy.stats.gaussian_kde which is a standard representation for most statsiticians. In seaborn, you can plot sns.kdeplot for ...


1

Very easy with Pandas. import pandas from collections import Counter a = ['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e'] letter_counts = Counter(a) df = pandas.DataFrame.from_dict(letter_counts, orient='index') df.plot(kind='bar') Notice that Counter is making a frequency count, so our plot type is 'bar' not 'hist'.


1

Rather than use groupby() (which requires your input to be sorted), use collections.Counter(); this doesn't have to create intermediary lists just to count inputs: from collections import Counter counts = Counter(a) You haven't really specified what you consider to be a 'histogram'. Lets assume you wanted to do this on the terminal: width = 120 # ...


1

Check out matplotlib.pyplot.bar. There is also numpy.histogram which is more flexible if you want wider bins.


1

Do you just want 20,000 samples from the distribution of the non-missing data? If so, another way to approach this would be to just calculate a kernel density estimate directly from the non-missing data and then sample from that. For example, using fake data: # Fake data with some missing values set.seed(31) dat = rnorm(30000, 20, 10) dat[sample(1:30000, ...


1

You cannot swap the axes for histograms, gnuplot implicitely uses integer x-values and you have no possiblity to changes this. As workaround you can use boxxyerrobars: Consider the data file first 5 second 11 third 2 fourth 6 You can plot this with reset set style fill solid noborder set autoscale yfix set offset 0,1,0.5,0.5 set xrange [0:*] plot ...


1

I believe you can do this with the ggsubplot package. See the article and the package. I believe the code will look something like: qplot(age, y, data = dataset, color = sex) + geom_subplot(aes(x, y, data = distributions, group = sex, subplot = geom_violin(aes(x, y, data = distributions)))) But I don't think your example provides enough ...



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