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3

First I fix your function: rata<-function(N,r,u,d,S){ x <- numeric(N+1) for(i in 0:N){ x[i]<-S*u^{i}*d^{N-i} } return(x) } Or relying on vectorization: rata<-function(N,r,u,d,S){ x<-S*u^{0:N}*d^{N-(0:N)} return(x) } taf<-rata(100000,1,1.1,0.9,1) Looking at the result, we notice that it contains NaN values: taf[7440 ...


3

Your bin size, in this case, in logarithmic terms, is 2. If you wish to use another bin size, substitute the 2s in the script below. select pow(2, floor(ln(val) / ln(2))) as bin, count(bin) as qty from mytable group by bin; Explanation First, we take the log of your values in base 2. log(val, 2) might work in some RDBMS, but if not, ...


2

You can count the number of entries starting with "abc" in each row with y <- apply(df, 1, function(x) sum(grepl("^abc", x))) #> y #[1] 6 4 6 6 This result could be plotted in a histogram with hist(y, breaks=c(1:max(y)), main = "Frequency of 'abc' entries", col="lightblue") If you prefer a graphical representation of the value of "abc" counts ...


2

by default, pairplot uses the diagonal to "show the univariate distribution of the data for the variable in that column" (http://stanford.edu/~mwaskom/software/seaborn/generated/seaborn.pairplot.html). So each bar represent the count of values in the corresponding bin (that you can get from the X axis). The Y axis, however, does not correspond to the actual ...


2

The manual way: you can extract the histogram information using ggplot_build. Then find the maximum y-value, and the x-location of the corresponding bar in the histogram. library(ggplot2) data(diamonds) ## The plot as you have it q <- qplot(price, data = diamonds, geom = "histogram", col = 'blues') ## Get the histogram info/the location of the highest ...


2

You could try something like this. ## Sample data set.seed(0) dat <- rlnorm(1000, 7) ## MLE estimates library(fitdistrplus) pars <- coef(fitdist(dat, "lnorm")) ## table variables breaks <- seq(1, max(dat)+100, 100) # histogram breaks mids <- diff(breaks)/2 + head(breaks, -1) # midpoints probs <- ...


2

For an array of integers, you can use numpy.bincount. For example, In [59]: a = np.array([1,2,5,3,2]) In [60]: np.bincount(a) Out[60]: array([0, 1, 2, 1, 0, 1]) The return value is an array of counts of values from 0 up to the maximum found in the input. For the array of floating point values, you can use numpy.unique with the argument ...


2

To complement Dan's solution. In the case where there are several identique values in your sample, you can use numpy.unique : Z = np.array([1,1,1,2,2,4,5,6,6,6,7,8,8]) X, F = np.unique(Z, return_index=True) F=F/X.size plt.plot(X, F)


2

As others have said, there are lots of ways to do this. I'd be inclined to start by overlaying the distributions with density plots. Your sample has too few cases for this to be useful, so the code below creates an artificial example with 2000 cases. In this example, eCheck payments are normally distributed with mean = $100 and sd = $25, and Credit Card ...


2

There are various models to use when you have a scale\continuous independent variable and a binary dependent variable. But, you should (strictly) specify your objective, otherwise you'll get lost in the options you have. Logistic regression is one option and especially useful when you want to investigate relationships between variables, as the output ...


2

You want an output of size [50,25] which is already summarized. The output of bsxfun should be of dimensions [50,25,42] which means all inputs must be of this size except for singleton dimensions. Your [42, 50] needs to be permute to [50,1,42] and the second input to [1,25,42] x1=rand(42,50); x2=rand(42,25); x1=permute(x1,[2,3,1]); x2=permute(x2,[3,2,1]); ...


1

Since you haven't provided example data, I am showing a basic example using random data. You can create breaks to group your data using the function cut and then boxplot to create the chart. Base set.seed(12) y <- rnorm(1000) x <- rnorm(1000) rng <- seq(-3, 3, 0.5) boxplot(y ~ cut(x, breaks = rng), las = 2) Using ggplot2 set.seed(12) ...


1

How about this: val num_bins = 20 val mx = a.max.toDouble val mn = a.min.toDouble val hist = a .map(x=>(((x.toDouble-mn)/(mx-mn))*num_bins).floor.toInt) .groupBy(x=>x) .map(x=>x._1->x._2.size) .toSeq .sortBy(x=>x._1) .map(x=>x._2)


1

For starters I would do a boxplot for each of the categories and compare visually differences in the distribution. Data d <- structure(list(PaymentType = structure(c(2L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L), .Label = c("CreditCard", "eCheck"), class = "factor"), DollarAmount = c(114L, 114L, 39L, 16L, 16L, 114L, 228L, 228L, 228L, ...


1

The assumption that a "breaking point" exists --- i.e., that the relationship is some sort of step function --- is a strong one that I would urge you to probe empirically before proceeding as if it were true. To do that, I would use logistic regression with smoothing splines to check for a nonlinear relationship. Let's assume your data set is named data and ...


1

In order to create a histogram you need to remove the "value" variable and create the corresponding number of rows for "x" based on that value. So, if for group A you have x = 3 and value = 10, the process has to create x = 3 for group A 10 times. Run the process step by step to see how it works. I've included decimals for "x". library(reshape2) ...


1

You can use arithmetic to divide the values. Here is one method. It essentially takes the ceiling value of maxX / 5 and uses that to define the partitions: select (case when cast(maxX / params.n as int) = maxX / params.n then (x - 1) / (maxX / param.n) else (x - 1) / cast(1 + maxX / params.n as int) end) as category, ...


1

In case you haven't figured it out yet (or for the next person who comes along with a similar issue), there is a terrific blog post here about altering all axes things in hist3D: http://entrenchant.blogspot.co.uk/2014_03_01_archive.html


1

In general this is a bad idea - histograms show the continuity of data, and gaps ruin that. You can use the previous code with smaller gaps (your values hit the previous gaps): hist(varx,breaks=rep(1:7,each=2)+c(-.05,.05)) But this is not a general solution - any values closer than 0.05 to the cutoff will end up in the gap region. We can make a bar plot ...


1

The code works, but needs smaller numbers: varx <- c(1.234, 1.32, 1.54, 2.1 , 2.76, 3.2, 4.56, 5.123, 6.1, 6.9) hist(varx, breaks=rep(1:7,each=2)+c(-.04,.04), freq=T) This returns a warning as it prefers to return "density" instead of "frequency" after manually changing the breaks in that way. Change to freq=F if you prefer.


1

OpenCV is not really suited for plotting. However, for simple histograms, you can draw a rectangle for each column (eventually with alternating colors) This is the code: #include <opencv2\opencv.hpp> #include <algorithm> using namespace std; using namespace cv; void drawHist(const vector<int>& data, Mat3b& dst, int binSize = 3, ...


1

Gnuplot histograms don't have a conventional numerical axis. You could put a condition in the xtic, but that affects only the tic labels, but not the tics. To get a normal numerical axis you must plot with boxes, but that doesn't allow you to stack values. Or you plot and stack with boxxyerrorbars: set key autotitle columnhead set style fill solid border ...


1

You can use collections.Counter: >>> from collections import Counter >>> counter = Counter([1,2,5,3,2]) >>> counter[1] 1 Similarly, >>> counter = Counter([1.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2, 5, 8, 9, 2.3, 1.2]) >>> counter[1.2] 2 Use Counter.items() to get your key-value pairs: >>> counter.items() [(2, 1), (5, 1), ...


1

Adding newfig=False to the second plt.plotfile() set of arguments will stop the second graph being plotted in a different figure. A full example of ths can be found here.


1

I think your code doesn't run in the first place, cause you are trying to assign the output of getPosition (a 1x4 array) to the single entries of another array, which doesn't work. After correcting this to position = getPosition(handles.pet_hist_rect); you can now access xmin as position(1), ymin as position(2) and so on. Now, ymin = position(2) is ...


1

Using tidyr, dplyr and base R hist x <- data.frame(Set_1 = c("abc89", "abc6", "abc90", 111), Set_2 = c("abc62", "pop", "a16", "abc15"), Set_3 = c(67, "abc11", "abc123", "abc72"), Set_4 = c("abc513", "abc4", "abc33", "abc36"), stringsAsFactors=F) require(tidyr) require(dplyr) x %>% gather(Set, val) ...


1

Ok,if I understand correctly, you want a weighted histogram import pylab as plt import pandas as pd np = pd.np df = pd.DataFrame( {'age':np.random.normal( 50,10,300).astype(int), 'counts':1000*np.random.random(300)} ) # test data #df.head() # age counts #0 38 797.174450 #1 36 402.171434 #2 49 894.218420 #3 66 ...


1

As stated on the Pandas help, The plot method on Series and DataFrame is just a simple wrapper around plt.plot(): The plot needs to know about pandas’s data structures and the dataframe.hist() will extract this in the correct manner. If you want to plot using matplotlib, you need to extract the data from the dataframe, something like, import numpy as ...


1

Updated: This should do the job: https://jsfiddle.net/t4ho787f/11/ $(document).ready(function () { var values = [79.86, 59.57, 39.64, 49.08, 21.34, 17.05, 30.8, 3.63, 4.71, 9.88, 67.55, 71.01, 60.3, 50.95, 60.37, 48.14, 51.9, 16.91, 3.52, 67.98]; var rawData2 = [17000, 30000, 25000, 22000, 25000, 20000, 25000, 35000, 20000, 20000, 18000, 15000]; ...


1

You can get the counts of non-missing values in the columns (minus the first) and rows this way: # Toy data to test df <- data.frame(X1 = c(1, 1, NA, 3, NA), X2 = c(3, 4, NA, 1, 5), X3 = c(3, 4, 6, 1, 8)) # Now generate vectors of the counts column.counts <- colSums(!is.na(df[,2:ncol(df)])) row.counts <- rowSums(!is.na(df)) There are a few ways ...



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