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3

You could just do a barplot of the frequency table: num.dices <- 2L num.rolls <- 100000L outcomes <- matrix(sample(1:6, num.dices * num.rolls, replace = TRUE), nrow = num.rolls, ncol = num.dices) sums <- rowSums(outcomes) barplot(table(sums))


3

It is possible to color both the bars and their borders independently. But for that you need to know how many of those you have ! Here is a proposition, when what you want to do is to single out the first bar on the right to a certain value (here 1.96): set.seed(123) x <- rnorm(100) res.hist <- hist(x, plot=FALSE) n_bars <- length(res.hist$mids) ...


2

One thing you can do is that you can do the calculation before you draw the graphic. But, if I follow your approach, you would want something like this. ggplot(df, aes(x=x)) + geom_bar(aes(y = N/sum(N)), stat="identity", width=1.0, colour = "dark green", fill = 'paleturquoise4') + ylab("y")


2

The problem is that you are converting x to a factor in the aesthetics call. You can get around this by specifying the "levels" you want beforehand and making sure they don't get dropped (from this question): df$x <- factor(df$x, levels=c(0:25)) p <- ggplot(df, aes(x=x, y=N)) + geom_bar(stat="identity", width=1.0, colour = ...


2

You can do: ct <- cut(a, breaks = c(0, 2, max(a)), include.lowest=TRUE, labels=c("<=2", ">2")) ## [1] <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 >2 <=2 >2 >2 >2 <=2 >2 >2 <=2 ## [19] >2 >2 <=2 <=2 >2 >2 <=2 <=2 <=2 >2 <=2 >2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 ...


2

One alternative is to use text to insert labels into the plot: hist(Heiser$ZEB1[1:19], breaks=50, col="grey") text(Heiser$ZEB1, 2, labels= Heiser$CellLines, srt=90) Edit: Positioning labels in the same category one over another: Heiser_hist <- hist(Heiser$ZEB1[1:19], breaks=50, col="grey") Heiser$cut <- cut(Heiser$ZEB1, ...


2

Minimum peak separation Specify the minimum peak distance, or minimum separation between peaks as a positive integer. You can use the 'MINPEAKDISTANCE' option to specify that the algorithm ignore small peaks that occur in the neighborhood of a larger peak. When you specify a value for 'MINPEAKDISTANCE', the algorithm initially identifies all the ...


2

extract is never called in Histogram (which should preferrably implement Runnable) @Override public void run() { extract(); }


2

The function that goes hand in hand with hist is bar In your case, you already have your histogram/distribution values (so no need to call hist), you can directly call bar: bar( YourvectorOfBins , probden )


2

A simple way to do this is to create a new vector. Something like: with(Heiser, { color_HCC1008 <- ifelse(Heiser$CellLines == "HCC1008", col1, col2) text(ZEB1, pos, labels = CellLines, srt = 45, cex = 0.9, col = color_HCC1008) }) where col1 and col2 are your different colors. All you're doing here is saying "I want this index to have this color, ...


2

So the problem is that the image created by hist2d is plotted in data coordinates, but the contours you are trying to create are in pixel coordinates. The simple way around this is to specify the extent of the contours (i.e. rescale/reposition them in the x and y axes). For example: from matplotlib.colors import LogNorm from matplotlib.pyplot import * x = ...


2

From the documentation of Mat: //! the number of rows and columns or (-1, -1) when the array has more than 2 dimensions But you have 3 dimensions. You can access individual values of your histogram using hist.at<T>(i,j,k). Or you can use iterators as described in the documentation here. Code // Build with gcc main.cpp -lopencv_highgui ...


1

You're really close! What you want is to call .data(data) to bind all your data, not just the ages. This will make the data available to the callbacks bound with .on at the end. So why are you passing in allAge? Well, because that's what you're getting back from the histogram function. The docs state that The return value is an array of arrays: each ...


1

You can calculate the area in this way: import numpy import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = numpy.random.randn(1000) values, bins, _ = plt.hist(x, normed=True) area = sum(numpy.diff(bins)*values)


1

Well you are missing a call to histfit for your second histogram, so the line does not appear at all. Here is a sample code which works fine. Notice how I use findobj to fetch the actual lines and change their colors: rng default; % For reproducibility %// Generate dummy data S = normrnd(10,1,100,1); R = 3*normrnd(10,1,100,1); % Histograms ...


1

He is binning with lb <= x < up and splitting the interval [0,180] in [-10,10), [10, 30), [30,40) ..., [150,170), [170,190). Suppose x = 180, then: bin = floor(180/20-0.5) = floor(9-0.5) = floor(8.5) = 8; while if x = 0: bin = floor(`0/20-0.5) = floor(-0.5) = floor(-1) = -1; which respectively translate into x1 = 20 * (8+0.5) = 170 and x1 = ...


1

This code works as you said for (int a = 0; a < 9; a++) { if (hm <= arr[a]) //hm is Maximum number in array for height of a column. hm = arr[a]; } for (int i = hm; i >= 0; i--) { printf("|"); //for(int t = 0; t < width; t++){ //Width is where i got in trouble. //printf("|"); for (int a = 0; a < 9; ++a) { ...


1

I think you want something like this, (?P<colors>\d+):\s*\(\s*(?P<red>\d+),\s*(?P<green>\d+),\s*(?P<blue>\d+) DEMO


1

You can compute the number of unique values, and generate text labels outside the hist() computations. There are more efficient ways to do this split-apply-combine operation (look into dplyr and data.table), but the code below implements it with minimal changes: data= "SampleID Pos Dep Pvalues sample_1 849 62 0.02755358 sample_1 859 63 0.07406833 sample_1 ...


1

You can try to convert the data to double: y = double(part(:)); figure; hist(y);


1

You can do it in one line with pandas: import pandas as pd pd.read_csv('D1.csv', quoting=2)['column_you_want'].hist(bins=50)


1

Histograms are for time series data. You probably want a term panel.


1

You need to use the .ticks() call on the xAxis. I use d3.js, rather than dc.js, but looking at the docs I think that something like this should work: .xAxis().ticks(50)


1

Sorry I am not familiar with matplotlib. So I have a dirty hack for you. I just put all values that greater than 300 in one bin and changed the bin size. The root of the problem is that matplotlib tries to put all bins on the plot. In R I would convert my bins to factor variable, so they are not treated as real numbers. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ...


1

You need the min of all values in addition to max. Your condition will then be: if ((value - min) / (max - min) * lines < currentline) addch('*'); else addch(' '); (The quotient (value - min) / (max - min) is between 0 and 1 and requires floating-point arithmetic.)


1

Your problem is just scaling! You just have to change the freq parameter of hist from TRUE to FALSE: hh=hist( vec, breaks=round(n/10), freq=FALSE, xlim=c( floor(min(vec)), ceiling(max(vec)), col="grey" ) By doing so, you plot in y-axis the density rather than the frequency (number of appearance of each bin).


1

Ahh, it didn't occur to me until now that I don't have to use a list of breaks; I can simply calculate the bin index from the value and use the existing aggregate: binw <- 0.1 data$bin <- floor(log10(data$value) / binw) hdata <- aggregate(count ~ bin, data, sum) print(ggplot(hdata) + aes(xmin=10^(bin * binw), xmax=10^((bin + ...


1

If you've got noisy data, you may find that instead of one solid peak, you get lots of small ones (see the folowing image). The important data here is when the signal is high and when it is low - you don't care about small variations in value, you only want to use one of those peaks and not look at all the smaller local ones around it. If you know the ...


1

You generate 13 samples and plot 13 boxes at the sample place. Of course you don't see the transparency anymore. Change the first part of your plot command to draw a single box only: plot '+' using (ax+bw/2):($0 == 0 ? ay : 1/0) with boxes lc rgb "green"


1

To increase the spacing between the xtics you must increase the canvas width when setting your terminal: set terminal wxt size 1000,500



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