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3

Its what that collections.Counter is for : >>> from collections import Counter >>> Counter('The Goose that Laid the Golden Egg') Counter({' ': 6, 'e': 4, 'h': 3, 'o': 3, 't': 3, 'a': 2, 'd': 2, 'G': 2, 'g': 2, 'i': 1, 'L': 1, 'l': 1, 's': 1, 'T': 1, 'E': 1, 'n': 1})


3

Your code histogram to plotly is working. You are just missing one last step. What your plotly shows is a grouped bar chart. Eseentially what plotly has done is display 2 bars in a single column. What you need to do, is go to traces > mode and change to 'overlay' bar chart here's my implementation https://plot.ly/1/~quekxc


3

Here is the code which draws histogram of each color channels of an image. I=imread('lena.png'); r=I(:,:,1); g=I(:,:,2); b=I(:,:,3); totalNumofPixel=size(I,1)*size(I,2); FrequencyofRedValues=zeros(256,1); FrequencyofGreenValues=zeros(256,1); FrequencyofBlueValues=zeros(256,1); for x=0:255 FrequencyofRedValues(x+1)=size(r(r==x),1); // number of ...


3

Try this: par(mfrow = c(2, 2)) tapply(iris$Sepal.Length, iris$Species, hist) however, for multi-panel plots you might find the lattice or ggplot2 plackages more suitable. library(lattice) histogram(~ Sepal.Length | Species, iris) library(ggplot2) ggplot(iris, aes(Sepal.Length)) + geom_histogram() + facet_wrap(~ Species)


3

Here is a different algorithm for your question: im = imread('lena.png'); % imshow(im); histogram(im) function histogram(im) [rowSize, colSize, rgb] = size(im); nshades = 256; hist = zeros(rgb, nshades); figure, RGB = ['r', 'g', 'b']; names = [{'Red Channel'}, {'Green Channel'}, {'Blue ...


3

For anyone coming across this question: Since pandas 0.14, plotting with bars has a 'width' command: https://github.com/pydata/pandas/pull/6644 The example above can now be solved simply by using df.plot(kind='bar', stacked=True, width=1)


3

Are you wanting to place a bar with a fixed width at the center of each bin? If so, try something something similar to this: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt data = [0,2,30,40,50,10,50,40,150,70,150,10,3,70,70,90,10,2] bins = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100,200] counts, _ = np.histogram(data, bins) centers = ...


2

Change the scales to free on both axes: facet_grid(variable~len, scales="free") (instead of "free_y") For your second question, the entries are coerced to a factor vector, and the order happens to have entries with length 10 come before length 9. You can reorder them by reordering the levels in the oligo factor. If you want to do it based on the len ...


2

Here you go, with seaborn, as you please. But you have to understand that seaborn itself uses matplotlib to create plots. AND: Please delete your other question, now it really is a duplicate. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import seaborn as sns sns.set_palette("deep", desat=.6) sns.set_context(rc={"figure.figsize": (8, 4)}) data = ...


2

Here's an attempt to the best of my understanding on the question. # sample data DF = read.table(text=" convergence rules fact time 1 1 domain 1802 8629 2 1 domain 1802 8913 3 1 rdfs 595 249 4 1 domain 1 9259 5 1 videcom 1 9071 6 2 domain 314151 9413 7 2 ...


2

What you are seeing is that some of the bins are empty, so it draws a rectangle that goes from f(y) -> 0 -> f(y+delta) -> 0 -> f(y+2*delta). A common trick to get around this is not to use a sharp cutoff as your bin (we call it a kernal). You can use, for example, Kernel density estimation to "smooth" out the histogram. In this case you place a ...


2

I generate some random data set.seed(1) df <- data.frame(Var1 = letters, Freq = sample(1: 8, 26, T)) Then I use dplyr::filter because it is very fast and easy. library(ggplot2); library(dplyr) qplot(data = filter(df, Freq > 2), Var1, Freq, geom= "bar", stat = "identity")


2

I won't solve this for you, but will give you a hint: use collections.Counter. Combine this with the fact that strings are iterable, and this gets you very close to a solution.


2

The docs show that if you want to explicitly provide bins, they should be provided with the bins keyword argument, i.e. H, x, y = np.histogram2d(Xg[1:len(Xg)],vol[1:len(vol)], bins=[XgBins, volBins])


2

Yes, use ImageMagick's identify command: identify -verbose image1.png Image: image1.png Format: PNG (Portable Network Graphics) Mime type: image/png Class: DirectClass Geometry: 150x150+0+0 Units: Undefined Type: PaletteAlpha Endianess: Undefined Colorspace: sRGB Depth: 8-bit Channel depth: red: 8-bit green: 8-bit blue: ...


2

How about: set.seed(101) hist(runif(100,-500,500)) axis(side=1,lwd=0,lwd.ticks=4,at=0,lend=1,labels=FALSE,tcl=-1) Specify lend=1 to get the line end not to extend above the axis. See par for more information about tcl and lend.


2

You are not doing it rigth. There are a couple of things you are not doing correctly: First, the number of pieces of a is not properly computed. To know the amount of pieces youneed to do you need the frequenzy of the data. freq=0.05; %seeing your comments n=numel(a)*freq/Range; nindexRange=Range/freq; %how many data is in each Range This will give you ...


2

This might give you a starting point: private void HistoGram() { // Get your image in a bitmap; this is how to get it from a picturebox Bitmap bm = (Bitmap) pictureBox1.Image; // Store the histogram in a dictionary Dictionary<Color, int> histo = new Dictionary<Color,int>(); for (int x = ...


1

If you have the raw data from the counts, you could use plt.hexbin to create the plots for you (IMHO this is better than a square lattice): Adapted from the example of hexbin: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt n = 100000 x = np.random.standard_normal(n) y = 2.0 + 3.0 * x + 4.0 * np.random.standard_normal(n) plt.hexbin(x,y) plt.show() ...


1

is there any reason why you have to use global variable declaration Your problem seems to be solvable by declaring %gap_ids outside of the first while loop. and this will hash will be accessible in the second while loop so your code should be : #!/usr/bin/perl use strict ; use warnings ; open (my $fh_tmp, '<', "/tmp/gap_output") ; my %gap_ids; ...


1

my declares a variable that is local to the curly braces that it's inside. use strict; my $visible_to_the_whole_file = 7; { my $only_visible_in_here = 21; } print "$visible_to_whole_file\n"; # works ok print "$only_visible_in_here\n"; # WILL FAIL, there is no variable any more. You can ignore our entirely since you're not using package ...


1

Histograms do not usually show you probabilities, they show the count or frequency of observations within different intervals of values, called bins. pyplot defines interval or bins by splitting the range between the minimum and maximum value of your array into n equally sized bins, where n is the number you specified with argument : bins = 1. So, in this ...


1

The third parameter channels in the call to cv::calcHist(...) should not be 0 (which makes it a null pointer). OpenCV expects here a pointer to an array of indices depicting the channels of interest. Since you want to use the first channels (index 0), your code should look like this: int channels[] = { 0 }; calcHist(&cell_fourPx, 1, channels, ...);


1

What you're describing doesn't sound like a histogram (which is a very specific plot for continuous random variables to estimate the kernel density); sounds like you just want a bar chart. I believe this is what you're looking for myDF <- data.frame( ref=c("A","A","A","C","C","C","G","G","G","T","T","T"), ...


1

This can be done with some string manipulation monkey business. But you will need to display the resulting text strings with a monospaced font. In many fonts, space characters take less space that star characters, so the zero-points won't line up right if you display these strings of stars that way. First, the expression IF(value<0, -value, 0) will ...


1

If some of the bins are empty you can filter them out with boolean indexing: p.plot(bincenters[y>0],y[y>0],'-')


1

The problem is that each bin start at different position depending of the data. You can solve this problem by setting where the bin start with the parameter range when you call the histogram. (Don't get confuse with the function range()) import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np #set value for testing actual_nn = np.random.randn(100) random_nn = ...


1

You need to do the following to have what you want: a <- read.table(header=T , text="cars type company value car1 all company1 0.4 car2 all company1 0.6 car3 all company1 1 car1 one company1 1.2 car1 one company1 0.1 car2 one company1 0.1 car3 one company1 0.9 car1 one company1 0.44 car2 one company2 0.55 car3 one company2 0.1 car1 ...


1

I think I just cracked it ... Make a new function out of hist and after edges in the m file add this line: [~,my_labels] = histc(y,edges,1); and my_labels will contain your matrix with the histogram values instead of the actual values.


1

Building upon user1415946's comment, you can assume each point represents a bi-variate normal distribution with the covariance matrices given by [[e_x[i]**2,0][0,e_y[i]**2]]. However, the resulting distribution is not a normal distribution - you'll see, after running the example, how the histogram doesn't resemble a Gaussian at all, but instead a group of ...



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