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6

You can set the line width with par(): opar <- par(lwd=2) plot(h) par(opar)


4

Below is a function I implemented that acts as a bar3 replacement (partially). In my version, the bars are rendered by creating a patch graphics object: we build a matrix of vertex coordinates and a list of faces connecting those vertices. The idea is to first build a single "3d cube" as a template, then replicate it for as many bars as we have. Each bar ...


3

OK. First of all, you should know exactly what a histogram is. It is not a plot of counts. It is a visualization for continuous variables that estimates the underlying probability density function. So do not try to use hist on categorical data. (That's why hist tells you that the value you pass must be numeric.) If you just want counts of discrete values, ...


3

You can use the two outputs of imhist to obtain gray levels and count of each level. Use then the second output of max to obtain the index of the level whose count is maximum. Finally, the result is the level with that index. [count levels] = imhist(I); %// get levels and count of each level [~, v] = max(count); %// v is the index corresponding to maximum ...


3

You can simply take care of it at render time without any transforms or recalculating. Simply treat d.x as y-position, d.dy as width instead of height. Swapping between x and y might seem inappropriate, but it's totally reasonable. There are even examples of radial charts drawn this way too, using the x values to derive the angle of the bar and the y value ...


3

I don't have access to Octave, butI believe this should do the trick: Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; [H W] = size(Z); h = zeros( 1, numel(Z) ); ih = 1; for ix = 1:W fx = ix-.45; tx = ix+.45; for iy = 1:W fy = iy-.45; ty = iy+.45; vert = [ fx fy 0;... fx ty 0;... tx fy 0;... ...


2

Have you looked at this toturial on bar3? Adapting it slightly: Z=[2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; % input data figure; h = bar3(Z); % get handle to graphics for k=1:numel(h), z=get(h(k),'ZData'); % old data - need for its NaN pattern nn = isnan(z); nz = kron( Z(:,k),ones(6,4) ); % map color to height 6 faces per data point nz(nn) = NaN; % ...


2

How about this? object Hist { type Bins = Map[Double, List[Double]] // artificially increasing bucket length to overcome last-point issue private val Epsilon = 0.000001 def histogram(data: List[Double], binsCount: Int) = { require(data.length > binsCount) val sorted = data.sorted val min = sorted.head ...


2

Solution using only functions available in OCTAVE, tested with octave-online This solution generates a surface in a similar way to the internals of Matlabs hist3d function. In brief: creates a surface with 4 points with the "height" of each value, which are plotted at each bin edge. Each is surrounded by zeros, which are also plotted at each bin edge. ...


2

I think the following should do the trick. I didn't use anything more sophisticated than colormap, surf and patch, which to my knowledge should all work as-is in Octave. The code: %# Your data Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; %# the "nominal" bar (adjusted from cylinder()) n = 4; r = [0.5; 0.5]; m = length(r); theta = (0:n)/n*2*pi + pi/4; sintheta = ...


2

First, fill in your 16 bins without considering date at all. Then, sort the elements within each bin by date. Now, you can use binary search to efficiently locate a given year/month/week within each bin.


2

You don't need to post all that settings for the tics, the labels and the multiplotting to show the problem. You can use e.g. linecolor variable to select different line types depending on the value in the first column: set terminal png enhanced set output 'foobar.png' set yrange [0:1] set style fill solid set linetype 1 lc rgb 'blue' set linetype 2 lc ...


2

It fails because you cannot add tuples. What you need are numpy arrays: import numpy as np a=np.array([45,22,17,28]) b=np.array([32,17,15,27]) c=np.array([15,18,22,25])


2

This should be the configuration you are looking for: You have to specify index c with a zorder > a and > b, i.e., (index c, ..., zorder=3); (index b, ..., zorder=2); (index a, ..., zorder=1). Your code should look like: a=(45,22,17,28) b=(32,17,15,27) c=(15,18,22,25) rects1 = plt.bar(index, a, bar_width, alpha=opacity, ...


2

Here is how you do it: ggplot_build(p2)$data[[1]]


1

If you do want to use lattice, you should use histogram() instead of hist(). subset() is useful too. set.seed(101) don <- data.frame(TGiving=round(rgamma(1000,shape=5,scale=100))) library(lattice) histogram(~TGiving,data=subset(don,TGiving!=0 & TGiving<1000))


1

This a pretty cluncky way of doing it. Perhaps it would be easier to see what was happening if you created a temporary variable with the first part of that expression which removes the values below 0 and then worked with it. temp <- don$TGiving[don$TGiving!=0] # remove items below 0 hist( temp[ temp < 1000 ] ) # remove items above 1000 ...


1

proc sgplot data=have; histogram x / fillattrs=graphdata1 name='s' legendlabel='x' transparency=0.5 binstart=2.5 binwidth=5; histogram y / fillattrs=graphdata2 name='d' legendlabel='y' transparency=0.5 binstart=2.5 binwidth=5; keylegend 's' 'd' / location=inside position=topright across=1; ...


1

scipy.stats.rv_discrete has you covered. It'll help you make a random distribution class from your data. The result will have a whole slew of handy methods. The .stats method will give you the first four moments. If you don't specify, it'll just return mean (m) and variance (v). b2=bin[:-1] print mean(a), var(a), scipy.stats.skew(a) dist = ...


1

As indicated in Ji-Young Park's answer, the reading loop has problems because it uses negative indexes into the array wordsOfLength. I would keep life simple and have wordsOfLength[i] store the number of words of length i, though it effectively wastes wordsOfLength[0]. I would use the macros from <ctype.h> to spot word boundaries, and I'd keep a ...


1

bglstat = np.array([9.0, 10.0, 2.0, 7.0, 7.0, 4.0]) candyn = np.array([2.0, 2.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 3.0, 1.0, 2.0, 1.0, 1.0]) candid = np.array([1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, 10.0]) fig = plt.figure() a2 = fig.add_subplot(111) a2.scatter(candid, candyn, color='red') a2.set_xlabel("Candidate Bulgeless Galaxy ID #") a2.set_ylabel("Classified as ...


1

The step plot will generate the appearance that you want from a set of bins and the count (or normalized count) in those bins. Here I've used plt.hist to get the counts, then plot them, with the counts normalized. It's necessary to duplicate the first entry in order to get it to actually have a line there. (a,b,c) = plt.hist(x1, bins=bin_n, ...


1

If you don't know the underlaying distribution, maybe the function ksdensity (Statistics Toolbox required) is useful: x = [randn(3000,1); 15+randn(3000,1)]; figure; hist(x,40) [f,xi] = ksdensity(x); figure; plot(xi,f);


1

You have to normalize so that the total probabilities sum to one. Typically that means summing over the histogram or integrating if the function is continuous, then dividing.


1

Some suggestions: change the size of the figure. Most of all pay attention to the ratio: if you have too many columns in a bar chart, it should have a wider ratio. change the orientation of the text. Rotating by 90 degrees makes it much more legible. I tried the following code, and it worked great: import matplotlib.pyplot as pl import numpy as np fig ...


1

SELECT * FROM my_table; +----+-----+ | id | val | +----+-----+ | 1 | 19 | | 2 | 10 | | 3 | 6 | | 4 | 29 | | 6 | 27 | | 7 | 20 | | 8 | 11 | | 9 | 12 | | 13 | 16 | | 14 | 38 | | 15 | 8 | | 16 | 22 | | 17 | 23 | | 18 | 16 | | 19 | 20 | | 20 | 18 | | 28 | 18 | | 29 | 7 | | 30 | 10 | | 31 | 34 | | 32 | 11 | | 33 | 17 | | 34 | 15 ...


1

Is it possible to handle this requirements with iOS7 standard API or do I need a 3rd party framework It's certainly possible to do it all yourself with no help from anybody except the frameworks that Apple provides. Whether that's the best solution for you, only you can decide. I think these are the relevant considerations: You seem to have some ...


1

To avoid guessing the amplitude, call hist() with normed=True, then the amplitude corresponds to normpdf(). For doing a curve fit, I suggest to use not the density but the cumulative distribution: Each sample has a height of 1/N, which successively sum up to 1. This has the advantage that you don't need to group samples in bins. import numpy as np from ...


1

The lines are the median (solid line) and the interquartile range (dotted lines). The histograms just illustrate the frequencies of the sample values.


1

Here is a solution, employing the group_by functionality found in the link below: http://pastebin.com/c5WLWPbp import numpy as np dates = np.arange('2004-02', '2005-05', dtype='datetime64[D]') np.random.shuffle(dates) values = np.random.randint(40,200, len(dates)) years = np.array(dates, dtype='datetime64[Y]') months = np.array(dates, ...



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