Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

geom_histogram() uses stat_bin() to divide your data in bins. Default value for stat_bin() is right=FALSE that means that class start with value including and end with value not including this value, for example, class 0.9-1 will include 0.9 but won't include 1. To change this to oposite direction just add right=TRUE to geom_histogram(). ...


4

As far as I can tell, pandas can't handle this situation. That's ok since all of their plotting methods are for convenience only. You'll need to use matplotlib directly. Here's how I do it: %matplotlib inline import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas #import seaborn #seaborn.set(style='ticks') np.random.seed(0) df = ...


4

By default, ggplot uses range/30 as binwidth, as prompted. In your case, it is approximately 48/30 (depends on the seed), which is more than 1 and is around 1.5. Now, your data is not continuous, you only get integers, so for any two adjacent histogram bins you'll get irregularities, caused by the fact that the first bin will only contain one possible ...


3

How about: x <- c(5,2) table(cut(x = x, breaks = c(-Inf, -1, 0, 1.5, Inf))) This would work too: maxval <- 1.1*max(abs(x)) hist(x = c(.5,2), breaks = c(-maxval, -1, 0, 1.5, maxval), plot=FALSE)$counts This is the original (perfectly sensible) suggestion: hist(x = c(.5,2), breaks = c(-Inf, -1, 0, 1.5, Inf), ...


3

This is probably when you want to use matplotlib's object-oriented interface. There are a couple ways that you could handle this. First, you could want each plot on an entirely separate figure. In which case, matplotlib lets you keep track of various figures. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt a = np.random.normal(size=200) b = ...


3

A solution for histograms is as follows: import pylab as pl N, bins, patches = pl.hist(pl.rand(1000), 20) jet = pl.get_cmap('jet', len(patches)) for i in range(len(patches)): patches[i].set_facecolor(jet(i)) Result: I hope that's what you are looking for.


2

Just plot your histogram and capture the output (you'll still need to multiply the density by 100 to get to % before plotting): h <- hist(coeff_value,plot=F,breaks=10) h$density <- h$density*100 plot(h, freq=F, xlab="rate", ylab="Probability (%)", ylim=c(0, 25), col="gray") densF <- density(coeff_value) lines(densF$x, densF$y*100, ...


2

How about this. First, define the labels labelat <- seq(as.Date("2000-03-01"), as.Date("2001-03-01"), by="1 month") labels <- strftime(labelat, "%b %d") labelat <- labelat-labelat[1] Then use them in the scale_x_continuous ... scale_x_continuous(expand = c(0, 0), breaks=as.numeric(labelat), labels=labels) + ... which gives


2

Using gnuplot there are several ways to achieve this. Here is one option, which I find quite reasonable:: Store the values belonging to one v-value in one data block. Two data blocks are separated with two new lines from each other. So an example data file might be: # v1 values -0.5 1.1 0.4 -0.2 # v2 values -0.1 0.1 -0.7 # v3 values 0.9 0.5 0.2 The ...


2

Such functions exist. You just need to store the patches returned by hist and access the facecolor of each of them: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt n, bins, patches = plt.hist([1,2,3]) for p in patches: print p.get_facecolor() p.set_facecolor((1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0)) Output: (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, ...


2

Looking at the code for histogramdd it simply uses the parameter bins=10 from the function definition when it's not given. From your link: def histogramdd(sample, bins=10, range=None, normed=False, weights=None):


2

The cause of error is because your image is RGB and imhist does not deal with that. To work around this you can either use a single channel: imhist(YourImage(:,:,Channel)); or convert from RGB to grayscale: imhist(rgb2gray(YourImage)); That should work fine now.


1

As far as I know, there is no cutting/breaking function in base R that allows you to specify such irregular breaks like that. You could wrap findInterval to do some of the manupulations findInterval2 <- function(x, br, rightmost.closed = FALSE, left.closed=TRUE, trim=FALSE, labels=NULL) { r <- findInterval(x, br, rightmost.closed) ...


1

The normal way to do this is to find your darkest pixel, and your brightest. You can do this in a singe loop iterating over all your pixels, pseudo-code like this: darkest=pixel[0,0] // assume first pixel is darkest for now, and overwrite later brightest=pixel[0,0] // assume first pixel is lightest for now, and overwrite later for all pixels if this ...


1

Can't comment on your code, but it seems to work. Note that the chi-square goodness-of-fit test is designed to work on counts of data falling within each bin. You cannot use it on normalized values, or with any other scaling, in fact. So whatever you show, the chi-square has to be based on the actual counts.


1

The way you're computing the width of the bars is incorrect for your particular use case; in particular it results in negative widths (as the error message indicates). You need to take the width of the range and divide it by the number of items (minus a small number if you want gaps): .attr("width", (x.range()[1] - x.range()[0]) / data.length - 2) ...


1

If you doing histogram equalization you need to first color convert it to a color space with a luminance channel, like Lab, HSV or YCrCb and then only equalize the luminance. If you try equalizing the RGB channels you will get weird color shifts.


1

The main problem of your code is after rgb2hsv(), the format of each pixel is double in [0,1], rather than uint8. So you need to convert back to [0,255] so it can be used as a subscript. The following code will work properly. for i=1:size(GIm,1) for j=1:size(GIm,2) value=floor(GIm(i,j) * 255); % now value is in [0,255] ...


1

I think this is what you are looking for: # Category names my.names <- c("test1","test2","test3") # Example data data <- runif(length(my.names)) # Normalize the example data as a percentage of the total data.norm <- data / sum(data) # Use barplot to plot the results, plot without an x axis x <- barplot(data.norm,names.arg=my.names,xaxt="n") ...


1

$_ is the current element of @list The code can be rewritten as follows: # Enumerate all values in the input list foreach my $value (@list) { # Compute histogram bin into which to place the current value my $bin_index = ceil(($value + 1) / $bin_width) - 1; # Increment the number of values in the bin $histogram{$bin_index}++; }


1

$_ here is used as implicit foreach variable; same thing could be explicitly written as my %histogram; for my $n (@list) { my $key = ceil(($n + 1) / $bin_width) -1; $histogram{$key} += 1; }


1

It is a postfix for loop. Your attempt to print $_ is probably failing because you are putting it outside the loop (but you didn't share your code for that attempt). It could be rewritten as: my %histogram; for my $value (@list) { $histogram{ceil(($value + 1) / $bin_width) -1}++ }


1

Its sounds like you want to do the following. With your data in a csv call bar.csv having this format: Dept Mean Median Trimmed_Mean Lobby 0.008 0.0018 0.0058 R & D 6.25 3.2 4.78 ROE 19.08 16.66 16.276 You can use library(ggplot2) and library(reshape) and the commands listed here dat.m<-read.csv("bar.csv") ...


1

For me this gives the desired results. df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(5000)) df.hist(normed = True) The 'density' option works in numpy's histogram function but not on pandas's hist function.


1

You can pass density parameter to hist, like this df.hist(..., density=True) Here, density is passed as kwds to np.hist. Reference: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.DataFrame.hist.html http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.histogram.html


1

You don't seem to be counting anything, so your plot isn't a histogram. It's a bunch of vertical 1D scatter plots arranged horizontally. The following uses matplotlib to get pretty close to your mock up (out of habit, I renamed "Differences" to the fairly conventional term "Residuals"): import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible