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7

In terms of calculating the histogram, the computation of the frequency per intensity is correct though there is a slight error... more on that later. Also, I would personally avoid using loops here. See my small note at the end of this post. Nevertheless, there are three problems with your code: Problem #1 - Histogram is not initialized properly ...


6

This goes against my policy in answering questions without any effort made by the question poser, but this seems like an interesting question, so I'll make an exception. First, split up each of the Time and Trial fields so that they're in separate arrays. For the Trial fields, I'm going to convert them into labels 1 and 2 to denote correct and incorrect ...


4

The hist function called with no output assignment will draw the chart for you but if you call it like this [contents, bins] = hist(data) it won't draw the chart and will store the relevant values in the two output variables. Then you can modify the contents variable and plot them with bar to achieve wht you need bar(bins, 10*contents)


4

Your code is obfuscating to me what your final result is supposed to be exactly. Maybe this: library(ggplot2) DF <- merge(xy.pop, xx.pop, by = "Var1") ggplot(DF, aes(y = Var1, xmin = -Freq.x, xmax = Freq.y, x = 0)) + geom_errorbarh() + geom_vline(xintercept = 0, size = 1.5) + theme_minimal() + xlab("") + ylab("") + theme(panel.grid = ...


3

Please research before asking. There is a function in Matlab scatterhist which does this x0 = 6.1; y0 = 3.2; n = 50; r = rand(n ,1 ); theta = 2*pi*rand(n, 1); x = x0 + r.*cos(theta); y = y0 + r.*sin(theta); scatterhist(x,y, 'Direction','out', 'Location', 'NorthEast') Edit: Using the data you provided. Is this what you want? FWHM11Avg = ...


3

Like Jester I'm surprised that your SIMD code had any significant improvement. Did you compile the C code with optimization turned on? The one additional suggestion I can make is to unroll your Packetloop loop. This is a fairly simple optimization and reduces the number of instructions per "iteration" to just two: pextrb ebx, xmm0, 0 inc dword [ebx * 4 + ...


3

Since you have an array of uchar, you know that your elements will always be in the range 0:255. After seeing Tamás Szabó's answer here I realized that the null character is exceedingly unlikely in a text file, so I will just ignore it and use the range 1:255. If you expect to have null characters, you'll have to adjust the range. In order to find the 10 ...


3

Use a nested call to table. Here's an example using a variable from iris: > table(iris$Sepal.Width) 2 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 4 4.1 4.2 4.4 1 3 4 3 8 5 9 14 10 26 11 13 6 12 6 4 3 6 2 1 1 1 1 > table(table(iris$Sepal.Width)) 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 ...


3

Your code looks correct. The problem is with the call to histogram. You need to supply the number of bins in the call to histogram, otherwise they will be computed automatically. Try this simple modification which calls stem to get the right plot, instead of relying on histogram function h = histogram_matlab(imageSource) openImage = ...


3

Calling hist silently returns information you can use to modify the plot. You can pull out the midpoints and the heights and use that information to put the labels where you want them. You can use the pos argument in text to specify where the label should be in relation to the point (thanks @rawr) x <- sample(1:10,1000,replace=T) ## Histogram info ...


2

You can run table, to tablulate all your data, and then hist on that, using your desired breaks etc: hist(table(Variable))


2

As far as I know, matplotlib does not have this function built-in. However, it is easy enough to replicate import numpy as np heights,bins = np.histogram(data,bins=50) heights = heights/sum(heights) plt.bar(bins[:-1],heights,width=(max(bins) - min(bins))/len(bins), color="blue", alpha=0.5) Edit: Here is another approach from a similar ...


2

Question 1 What do $mids and $equidist mean: From the help file: mids: the n cell midpoints. equidist: logical, indicating if the distances between breaks are all the same. Q2: Yes, with h1=hist(c(1,1,2,3,4,5,5,1.5), breaks=0.5:5.5) 1.5 will fall into the 0.5-1.5 categorie. If you want it to fall into the 1.5-2.5 categorie, you should ...


2

This is something I've been using lately: % generate some random data mu = [1 2]; sigma = [1 0.5; 0.5 2]; R = chol(sigma); my_data1 = repmat(mu,100,1) + randn(100,2)*R; mu = [2 1]; sigma = [3 -0.5; -0.5 2]; R = chol(sigma); my_data2 = repmat(mu,100,1) + randn(100,2)*R; % find limits minx = min([my_data1(:, 1); my_data2(:, 1)]); maxx = max([my_data1(:, 1); ...


2

This is what you are after... I have added plt.ion() to bring it into interactive mode and plt.draw() to add each figure as you define it. By doing this it becomes obvious that the axis is defined as (y,x) not (x,y)... This reference might also help in the future import pandas as pd import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib ...


2

Use scale_x_continuous: +scale_x_continuous(breaks=seq(-5,5,by=0.5))


1

Using IRanges, you should use findOverlaps or mergeByOverlaps instead of countOverlaps. It, by default, doesn't return no matches though. I'll leave that to you. Instead, will show an alternate method using foverlaps() from data.table package: require(data.table) subject <- data.table(interval = paste("int", 1:4, sep=""), start = ...


1

To restrict focus to just the middle 99% of the values, you could do something like this: trimmed_data = df[(df.Column > df.Columnquantile(0.005)) & (df.Column < df.Column.quantile(0.995))] Then you could do your histogram on trimmed_data. Exactly how to exclude outliers is more of a stats question than a Python question, but basically the idea ...


1

It's not really histogramming what your are after. A histogram is more a count of items that fall into a specific bin. What you want to do is more a group by operation, where you'd group your intensities by radius intervals and on the groups of itensities you apply some aggregation method, like average or median etc. What your are describing, however, ...


1

The following saves each file with the name image1, image2,... as a pdf file in your working directory. You can also change pdf to jpeg or png or ps. lapply(1:2,function(i){ pdf(paste0("image",i,".pdf")) hist(mtcars[,i]) dev.off()})


1

if you only need to do this for a handful of points, you could do something like this. If intensites and radius are numpy arrays of your data: bin_width = 0.1 # Depending on how narrow you want your bins def get_avg(rad): average_intensity = intensities[(radius>=rad-bin_width/2.) & (radius<rad+bin_width/2.)].mean() return ...


1

You can write a function that returns one horizontal line of the histogram at a given height, outputting a * for each column if it is at or equal that height and a space otherwise: def get_histogram_line(height, max_length): s = ""; for i in range(0, max_length + 1): if word_length_count[i] >= height: s += "***" else: ...


1

In order to center the bars you can do _ = df.hist(figsize=(12, 10), bins=bins, align='left')


1

Assuming uint8 precision, each call to imhist will give you a 256 x 1 vector, and so you can concatenate these together into a single 768 x 1 vector. After, call bar with the histc flag. Assuming you have your image stored in im, do this: red = imhist(im(:,:,1)); green = imhist(im(:,:,2)); blue = imhist(im(:,:,3)); h = [red; green; blue]; bar(h, 'histc'); ...


1

Matlab has a function for histogram matching and their site has some great examples too Just use any frame as the reference (I suggest using the first one, but there is no real reason to do so), and keep it for all the remaining frames. If you want to decrease processing time you can also try lowering the number of bins. For a uint8 image there are usually ...


1

You can binary search for binEdges using TreeMap: public static double[] binCounts(double[] x, double[] binEdges) { int binEdgesSize = binEdges.length; NavigableMap<Double, Integer> binEdgesMap = new TreeMap<>(); for (int i = 0; i < binEdgesSize; ++i) binEdgesMap.put(binEdges[i], i); double [] ret = new ...


1

You must give an explicit string as label: plot newhistogram 'foo', 'file.dat' u 2:xtic(1) t col, '' u 3 t col, \ '' u ($0-1):($2+$3):(sprintf('%.1f', $2+$3)) notitle w labels offset 0,1 font "Arial,8" As other improvement, I would use the offset option which allows you to give an displacement in character units, which doesn't depend on the yrange. ...


1

with your data, cases = list(set(actions)) fig, ax = plt.subplots() ax.hist(map(lambda x: times[actions==x], cases), bins=np.arange(min(times), max(times) + binwidth, binwidth), histtype='bar', stacked=True, label=cases) ax.legend() plt.show() produces


1

smooth histogram this filter out small local min max and noise use symmetric smoothing to avoid shifting to one side I smooth from left then from the right which lower the shifting a lot find/count the local max peaks count only big enough peaks (by some treshold) if peak count is not 2 then it is not a bimodal histogram unless you have different ...


1

If you just get the data from the hist function you can plot it in other, more flexible, ways. Is this more like what you want? OT = [124 124 124 125 125 125 126 249 249 250 250 250 312 312 312 438] binVals = unique(OT); histVals = hist(OT, binVals); bar(1:length(histVals), histVals); set(gca,'XTickLabel', mat2cell(binVals));



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