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7

x is between 0 and 1. In order for e to be between low and high, you need: e=(high-low)*x+low;


5

What you are plotting is a histogram of added-up ASCII values for white-space delimited strings in a text file. Following the name I assume it is a dictionary of English words. English is mainly written in lower-case letters, which have ASCII-codes from 97 (a) to 122 (z), on average 110 (disregarding letter frequencies). The histogram shows peaks at ...


4

If you set the line parameter in the title call to, for example, -2, you can place the title closer to the histograms: a=1 p = c(rnorm(1000,5,10)) l = c(rnorm(1000,10,5)) par(mfrow=c(1,2)) hist(p,main=NULL) hist(l,main=NULL) title(main=print(paste0("Histogram a=", a)),outer=T, line=-2)


3

This might be a bit late, but I decided to make a package (ggExtra) for this since it involved a bit of code and can be tedious to write. The package also tries to address some common issue such as ensuring that even if there is a title or the text is enlarged, the plots will still be inline with one another. The basic idea is similar to what the answers ...


3

Matplotlib uses a color cycle with predefined colors. You could modify this color cycle to your liking, but it is cleaner if you directly specify the colors in the call to hist. It is tedious to specify the colors manually, so you could use one of matplotlibs colormaps to generate them. In the example below, I also used a colormap from colorbrewer as those ...


3

We can use barplot in the following way to show counts of 1's for each unique value of the character variable # Generate sample data uniqueCarrier <- unlist(lapply(1:10, function(i) rep(paste(sample(letters,size = 3), collapse=""),10))) Delay <- rbinom(100, 1, prob = rep(c(.30, .2, .1, .5, .7, .6, .9, .2, .7, .6),each = 10)) # Create the plot ...


3

The worth-a-read answer in the comments was using the same example of plotrix::gap.barplot that I picked but I've been working on those "squiggly lines": require(plotrix) twogrp<-c(rnorm(10)+4,rnorm(10)+20) gap.barplot(twogrp, gap=c(8,16), xlab="Index", ytics=c(3,6,17,20), ylab="Group values", main="Barplot with gap") polygon(y=c( ...


2

Is this what you expected: ggplot(temp, aes(x=as.POSIXct(temp$Time,format="%H:%M"))) + geom_histogram( fill="lightblue", binwidth = 15*60, # 15 min *60 sec/min color="grey50") Note that these "times" are all on different days, but that the conversion to POSIXct format will implicitly make then all with today's date, so it might ...


2

If you don't care about zeros, don't pass them to hist: hist(I(I~=0),100)


2

SimpleHistogramBin is a good choice for this, as it allows specifying the bin bounds. Add the resulting bins to a SimpleHistogramDataset for use with ChartFactory.createHistogram(). Invoke setAdjustForBinSize() as needed. SimpleHistogramDataset data = new SimpleHistogramDataset("Time"); for (int i = 10; i < 70; i += 10) { data.addBin(new ...


2

There are two ways to go about this. One is to ignore the different scales and use relative frequency in your histogram. This results in a harder to read histogram. The second way is to alter the scale of one or the other element. I suspect this question will soon become interesting to you, particularly @hadley 's answer. ggplot2 single scale Here is a ...


2

As @user20650 kindly suggested in the comments, theme_classic() is a simple option to do what I was trying to achieve. Additionally, to move the x-axis just below the bars, scale_y_continuous(expand=c(0,0)) can be used. Thank you!


2

Check this public static int randInt(int min, int max) { Random rand = new Random(); // nextInt is normally exclusive of the top value, // so add 1 to make it inclusive int randomNum = rand.nextInt((max - min) + 1) + min; return randomNum; }


2

There are many ways to do this in R, all involving variations on the "split-apply-combine" strategy (split the data into groups, apply a function to each group, combine the results by group back into a single data frame). Here's one method using the dplyr package. I've created some fake data for illustration, since your data is not in an easily ...


1

The problem is that you convert the string to lower case before nul terminating it. Here i = 0; do { fflush(stdin); c = getchar(); string[i++] = c; } while (c != '\n'); /* Goes here <---------------------+ */ /* | */ //pretvori v majhne crke | */ char *p; /* ...


1

Matplotlib uses its own format for dates/times, but also provides simple functions to convert which are provided in the dates module. It also provides various Locators and Formatters that take care of placing the ticks on the axis and formatting the corresponding labels. This should get you started: import random import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import ...


1

imhist only shows the histogram, not the PDF. If you're looking for the PDF of X, you can use: histogram( X(:), 'Normalization', 'probability' ); axis tight EDIT: Full code I = imread('sample.jpg'); level = graythresh(I); X = rgb2gray(I); A = im2bw(X,level); A2 = im2bw(X,58/255); B = medfilt2(A2); figure, imshow(I) figure; histogram( X(:), ...


1

Suppose the dictionary is all lower-case. 1-letter words have a sum in the range 97-122. 2-letter words have a sum in the range 194-244. 3-letter words have a sum in the range 291-366. 4-letter words have a sum in the range 388-488. 5-letter words have a sum in the range 485-610. Only now are the ranges starting to overlap, and even then only for words ...


1

In Python opencv uses numpy arrays as data structures for images. So cv2.imread returns a numpy array. Matplotlib has a similar function, so for the example in your question you need neither opencv nor pil: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt im = plt.imread('pic.jpg') if im.shape[2] == 3: # Input image is three channels fig = plt.figure() ...


1

In java whenever a variable is declared, it have a certain scope. When you declare a variable inside a loop, it is only accessible inside that loop. Because the variable you are returning is declared inside the for loop, this is why it is giving an error. Try declaring a variable outside the loop and then access that in the for loop. You code will look like ...


1

In Java, the scope of a variable is bound by { } characters (in Javascript this is not the case). That means if a variable is declared in a set of {} (curly brackets), it cannot be referenced outside of these brackets. This is the case in your code. The variable e is declared in the loop, so you can not use it in the function's return statement. I would ...


1

This is not a weird behaviour: ggplot2 simply operates on data.frame objects - and not vectors: ggplot(data.frame(x=c(1,2,3,3,4,5)), aes(x=x)) + geom_histogram()


1

I think I may have figured it out. I changed the declaration of myHistogram to: var myHistogram = d3.layout.histogram() (studentSymbols.map(x));


1

ggplot2 makes it relatively straightforward to plot normalized histograms of groups with unequal size. Here's an example with fake data: library(ggplot2) # Fake data (two normal distributions) set.seed(20) dat1 = data.frame(x=rnorm(1000, 100, 10), group="A") dat2 = data.frame(x=rnorm(2000, 120, 20), group="B") dat = rbind(dat1, dat2) ggplot(dat, aes(x, ...


1

As already pointed out, this is problematic because the plots you want to merge have such different y-scales. You can try set.seed(15) mydata<-runif(50) hist(mydata, freq=F) lines(ecdf(mydata)) to get


1

Did you mean something like this? it is HSV histogram showed as 3D graph V is ignored to get to 3D (otherwise it would be 4D graph ...) if yes then this is how to do it (do not use OpenCV so adjust it to your needs): convert source image to HSV compute histogram ignoring V value all colors with the same H,S are considered as single color no matter ...


1

Your curve and histograms are on different y scales and you didn't check the help page on stat_function, otherwise you'd've put the arguments in a list as it clearly shows in the example. You also aren't doing the aes right in your initial ggplot call. I sincerely suggest hitting up more tutorials and books (or at a minimum the help pages) vs learn ggplot ...


1

There is no getRaster() method in the Android Bitmap class. Instead you can call getPixel() on the Bitmap directly. The function returns an integer ARGB value, which you can separate into its various components: int pixel = bi.getPixel(i, j); //increase if same pixel appears levels[Color.red(pixel)]++; You can set a pixel like this: int rgb = ...



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