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3

$step = 1000; $result = array_count_values( array_map( function ($value) use ($step) { return (int) ceil($value / $step) * $step; }, $dataArray ) ); var_dump($result);


3

It's easy to label midpoints for the ranges using: h <- hist(one, breaks = 3, xaxt = 'n') axis(1, h$mids, h$mids) But if you want to have the labels be character strings naming the ranges, you have to do a little more work. Take a look at str(h) to see what you have to work with: > str(h) List of 6 $ breaks : num [1:4] 2 4 6 8 $ counts : int ...


3

You can use the two outputs of imhist to obtain gray levels and count of each level. Use then the second output of max to obtain the index of the level whose count is maximum. Finally, the result is the level with that index. [count levels] = imhist(I); %// get levels and count of each level [~, v] = max(count); %// v is the index corresponding to maximum ...


2

Here is how you do it: ggplot_build(p2)$data[[1]]


2

import pandas as pd from matplotlib import pyplot as plt import numpy as np mydict = {0: 8012,25: 3710,100: 10794,200: 11718,300: 2489,500: 7631,600: 34,700: 115,1000: 3099,1200: 1766,1600: 63,2000: 1538,2200: 41,2500: 208,2700: 2138,5000: 515,5500: 201,8800: 10,10000: 10,10900: 465,13000: 9,16200: 74,20000: 518,21500: 65,27000: 64,53000: 82,56000: ...


2

Without sample data, it's always difficult to get reproducible results, so i've created a sample dataset set.seed(16) mydata <- data.frame(myvariable=rnorm(500, 1500000, 10000)) #base histogram hist(mydata$myvariable) As you've learned, hist() is a generic function. If you want to see the different implementations you can type methods(hist). Most of ...


2

A solution for histograms is as follows: import pylab as pl N, bins, patches = pl.hist(pl.rand(1000), 20) jet = pl.get_cmap('jet', len(patches)) for i in range(len(patches)): patches[i].set_facecolor(jet(i)) Result: I hope that's what you are looking for.


1

To get values actually plotted you can use function ggplot_build() where argument is your plot. p <- ggplot(mtcars,aes(mpg))+geom_histogram()+ facet_wrap(~cyl)+geom_vline(data=data.frame(x=c(20,30)),aes(xintercept=x)) pg <- ggplot_build(p) This will make list and one of sublists is named data. This sublist contains dataframe with values used ...


1

This part explains it: There are too many possible depths and counting each one would result in a histogram with a lot of bins so we divide the distance by four which means we only need a quarter of the number of bins: int[] count = new int[0x1FFF / 4 +1]; By dividing the depth values by 4 you are reducing the number of bins by lowering the ...


1

I don't think there is a function that will automatically prepare data for a histogram (including the calculation of the right number of buckets), but you can quite easily create histograms using Seq.countBy. For example, given a sequence of numbers nums between -1 and 1, you can write something like: nums |> Seq.countBy (fun v -> round(v*10.0)) ...


1

take a look on this: import numpy as np n=101 x = [np.random.randint(0, 12) for i in range(n)] y = [np.random.randint(0, 12) for i in range(n)] z = [np.random.random() for i in range(n)] #coord=[(x[i],y[i]) for i in range(n)] m=np.asarray([x,y]).transpose() d=dict() for i in range(n): coord=tuple(m[i]) d[coord]=d[coord]+[z[i]] if coord in d ...


1

Following simple version works: ggplot(eventdata, aes(x = factor(months), fill = season)) + geom_histogram()+ coord_polar()


1

Yes, you can compute the histogram with numpy and renormalise it. x = np.random.normal(0,.5,1000) y = np.random.normal(0,.5,100000) xhist, xbins = np.histogram(x, normed=True) yhist, ybins = np.histogram(x, normed=True) And now, you apply your regularisation. For example, if you want x to be normalised to 1 and y proportional: yhist *= len(y) / len(x) ...


1

Here is a simple solution where you loop through your $dataArray, $step_size = 1000; $histogramArray = array(); foreach ($dataArray as $v) { $k = (int)ceil($v / $step_size) * $step_size; if (!array_key_exists($k, $histogramArray)) $histogramArray[$k] = 0; $histogramArray[$k]++; } And the output would be, Array ( [1000] => 3 ...


1

You can build the output directly to avoid mapping the entire data array just to make use of array_count_values(); below is a more generic implementation that allows the mapping to be done outside of the function itself: function array_count_values_callback(array $data, callable $fn) { $freq = []; foreach ($data as $item) { $key = ...


1

If you do want to use lattice, you should use histogram() instead of hist(). subset() is useful too. set.seed(101) don <- data.frame(TGiving=round(rgamma(1000,shape=5,scale=100))) library(lattice) histogram(~TGiving,data=subset(don,TGiving!=0 & TGiving<1000))


1

This a pretty cluncky way of doing it. Perhaps it would be easier to see what was happening if you created a temporary variable with the first part of that expression which removes the values below 0 and then worked with it. temp <- don$TGiving[don$TGiving!=0] # remove items below 0 hist( temp[ temp < 1000 ] ) # remove items above 1000 ...


1

The rounding solution seems pretty straight forward: $step_size = 10; $data = array(10, 20, 24, 30, 35, 50); foreach ($data as $index => $value) { $data[$index] = round($value / $step_size) * $step_size; } // array(10, 20, 20, 30, 40, 50);


1

I think this does what you want (as per comments). The bar around 50 is split into the two colors. This is done by using a patch to change the color of part of that bar. %// Data: X = [32 64 32 12 56 76 65 44 89 87 78 56 96 90 86 95 100 65]; %// data values D = 50; %// where to divide into two colors %// Histogram plot: [y n] = hist(X); %// y: values; n: ...


1

The way to get data with different colors is to split the data into groups. In your case, split the data into three groups. For example with three groups: hist(data1); hold on; hist(data2); hist(data3); h = findobj(gca,’Type’,’patch’); display(h) set(h(1),’FaceColor’,’r’,’EdgeColor’,’k’); set(h(2),’FaceColor’,’g’,’EdgeColor’,’k’); ...


1

The reason for the error that you’re encountering is that OpenCV's cv2.compareHist function expects an Nx1 column array of bin counts, while the Numpy histogram function returns a tuple of the form (bin_counts, bin_edges). (See here to get some info about the OpenCV histogram functionality as exposed via Python bindings.) If you’re comparing colour images ...


1

Did you set up the ranges correctly? Based on the example: http://docs.opencv.org/modules/imgproc/doc/histograms.html#calchist cv::Mat bgr(480, 640, CV_8UC3, cv::Scalar(255.0, 255.0, 255.0)); // Quantize the B, G and R channels to 30 levels int histSize[] = {30, 30, 30}; // B, G and R varies from 0 to 255 float bRanges[] = { 0, 256 }; float gRanges[] = { ...


1

I've found the source of your script: Gnuplot Histogram Cluster (Bar Chart) with One Line per Category :) I had thought about a solution like solution 2 mentioned in that answer, but that doesn't work properly with the red and green colors beneath each other plus stacking the data. The script you posted needs only very little modifications. In order to put ...


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I've made a tool named Images similarities searcher for this purpose as free software available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/imgndxr/ It use two libraries: LIRE : http://www.semanticmetadata.net/lire/ The LIRE (Lucene Image REtrieval) library provides a simple way to retrieve images and photos based on their color and texture ...



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