Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Using some simulated data this should get you what you want. The key is that you have to create your bivariate bins, accomplished using the cuts() function. Then treating the binned factors as levels we can then count the combinations of each factor level using the table() function: library(plot3D) ## Simulate data: set.seed(2002) x <- rnorm(1000) y ...


5

What you probably want is the cumulative distribution function (CDF). It has probability on the y-axis (not x, as you asked), but since this is the standard way to represent the information that you want, it is best to use this curve. As an example, I produced 10'000 values with a standard normal distribution and then constructed the CDF: CF <- ...


3

It sounds like you just want to make sure that your x-axis values are numeric rather than factors ggplot(data=d1, aes(x=as.numeric(as.character(d.test)), y=Freq)) + geom_bar(stat="identity", width=.5) + geom_vline(xintercept=mean.score, color="blue", linetype="dashed") + scale_x_continuous(breaks=-2:3) which gives


3

This is one way to solve this problem that leverages the hist() function for most of the heavy lifting, and has the advantage that the barplot of the cumulative sum of y matches the bins and dimensions of the histogram of x: set.seed(1) mydata <- data.frame(y = runif (100, min= 0, max = 1), x = rpois(100, 15) * 10) mx <- mydata$x my <- mydata$y h ...


3

Summarizing all comments, this is what I wanted to have. Thanks @Alex A. set.seed(1) mydata <- data.frame(y = runif (100, min= 0, max = 1), x = rpois(100, 15) * 10) a <- aggregate(mydata$y, by=list(bin=cut(mydata$x, nclass.Sturges(mydata$x))), FUN=sum) a$bin<- gsub (']','',as.character (a$bin)) a$bin<- gsub (',',' ',as.character (a$bin)) ...


3

I usually use stopifnot() for this, so that you check the simplest condition first then proceed to the more complex; you don't want to test all of them at once if the first one is invalid: stopifnot(is.numeric(x)) stopifnot(is.factor(y)) stopifnot(length(x) == length(y)) Alternatively, doing all of this in one go: if(!(is.numeric(x) && ...


2

First problem: you need the 'visible' property of the figure object. ... fitobject = fit(centers',counts','gauss2'); hold on; figure('visible','off') plot(fitobject ,centers',counts'); hold off; ... Second problem: using the plot function with fit-objects calls actually a different plot (cfit) function, which is part of the the Curve Fitting Toolbox. ...


2

smooth frequency renders the data monotonic in x (i.e. the value given in the first using column, in your case the numerical value from column 6), and then sums up all y-values (the values given in the second using column). Here you also give the the sixth column, which is wrong if you want to count the number of occurrences of each distinct value in the ...


2

I agree with @Stibu that you want the CDF. When you are talking about a set of realized data, we refer to this as the empirical cumulative distribution function (ECDF). In R, the basic function call for this is ?ecdf: CF <- read.table(text="[1,] 2275.351 [2,] 2269.562 [3,] 1925.700 [4,] 1904.195 [5,] 1974.039", header=F) CF <- ...


2

You can use numpy.histogram to create the histogram's bins. First of all, get the absolute values of all the dictionary's values (since ids are irrelevant). dict_values = [abs(float(i)) for i in dict.values()] Then, use numpy.histogram specifying the range of the values explicitly. import numpy as np hist = np.histogram(dict_values, range=(0.0,1.0))


2

EDIT after comment. Better? ggplot()+ geom_histogram(aes(x=x), binwidth = 0.05, color = "grey30", fill = "white")+ coord_cartesian(xlim = c(0, 0.405)) + theme_tufte() + labs(y = "Frequency") + annotate("text", x = 0.4, xend = 0.4, y = 0.01, yend = .99, colour = "red", label = "//", size =6)


2

Using a histogram is one solution but it involves bining the data. This is not necessary for plotting a CDF of empirical data. Let F(x) be the count of how many entries are less than x then it goes up by one, exactly where we see a measurement. Thus, if we sort our samples then at each point we incrememnt the count by one (or the fraction by 1/N) and plot ...


1

You could use histtype='stepfilled' if you are okay with a plot where the data sets are plotted one behind the other. Of course, you'll need to carefully choose colors with alpha values, so that all your data can still be seen... a = [0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 3] * 2 b = [0.05, 0.05, 0.05, 0.15, 0.15, 2] colors = [(0.2, 0.2, 0.9, 0.5), (0.9, 0.2, 0.2, 0.5)] # ...


1

Okay, I found out the real problem: when you create the histogram with those bin-edge settings, the histogram creates bars which have equal size, and equal outside-spacing on the non-log scale. To demonstrate, here's a zoomed-in version of the plot in the question, but in non-log scale: Notice how the first two bars are centered around (0 + 0.1) / 2 = ...


1

Inspired by http://stackoverflow.com/a/30555229/635387 I came up with the following solution: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np d=[0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 1, 2, 3] def LogHistPlot(data, bins): totalWidth=0.8 colors=("b", "r", "g") for i, d in enumerate(data): heights = np.histogram(d, bins)[0] ...


1

numpy.histogram works only with numbers. When dt_array is your array of datetime objects, this would give you the histogram: to_timestamp = np.vectorize(lambda x: x.timestamp()) time_stamps = to_timestamp(dt_array) np.histogram(time_stamps)


1

Although you use xtic labels from your data file, the xtics are placed at integer x-values, starting at 0. Now, you cannot directly set arbitrary x-values when plotting histograms. You must use newhistogram at ... to shift the second part of the histogram further to the right: split = 8 plot 'test-bar.csv' using 2:xtic(1) every ::0::(split-1) lt 1,\ ...


1

package com.test; import java.util.Vector; public class VectorDemo { public static void main(String[] args) { // create an empty Vector vec with an initial capacity of 4 Vector<Integer> vec = new Vector<Integer>(4); // use add() method to add elements in the vector vec.add(0,4); vec.add(1,3); vec.add(2,2); ...


1

If you use the code you will see how the R decided to break up your data: data(mtcars) histinfo <- hist(mtcars$mpg) From the histinfo you will get the necessary information concerning the breaks. $breaks [1] 10 15 20 25 30 35 $counts [1] 6 12 8 2 4 $density [1] 0.0375 0.0750 0.0500 0.0125 0.0250 $mids [1] 12.5 17.5 22.5 27.5 32.5 $xname [1] ...


1

The warning is happening because the image size of or.tif is bigger than your screen. It's simply telling you that it is not displaying it at full size. This won't affect histogram equalisation. The Error with the histogram equalisation is because matlab expects I to be a 2D matrix. Your TIFF file is a 3D matrix, it has width x height x colour. Depending ...


1

You can do this by first disabling the axis in your hist call, then by adding in the axis again with the help of axTicks. # generate some data x <- rchisq(1000000,df=1) # create histogram x.hist <- hist(x,breaks=7,axes=FALSE) # create new axis # draw axis along 'y' axTicks(2) gets the values along 'x' from your plot axis(2, at=axTicks(2), ...


1

By default, geom_histogram() will use frequency rather than density on the y-axis. However, you can change this by setting your y aesthetic to ..density.. like so: ggplot(foo, aes(x = v, y = ..density.., weight = w)) + geom_histogram() This will produce a weighted histogram of v with density on the y-axis. You can also do this with the freq argument in ...


1

Always look up the matplotlib gallery. Chances are you can find the plot type you need, and the code you can use. Eg. Here's a histogram demo, and how to stack 4 plots into one


1

CV_COMP_INTERSECT is fast to compute since you just need the minimum value for each bin. But it will not tell you much about the distribution of the differences. Other methods try to achieve better and more continuous score as a match, under different assumptions about the pixel distribution. You can find the formulae used in different methods, at ...


1

You could use numpy.histogram's weights. Starting with your original data orig = [(1,100), (2,150), (1,300)] Split it like this: keys = [key for (key, _) in orig] weights = [weight for (_, weight) in orig] Then run import numpy as np np.histogram(keys, bins=bins, weights=weights)


1

Numpy has a handy function for dealing with this: np.clip. Basically, it does Artem's "dirty hack" inline. You can leave the values as they are, but in the hist call, just wrap the array in an np.clip call, like so plt.hist(np.clip(values_A, bins[0], bins[-1]), bins=bins) This is nicer because you do it right where it's needed, which reduces the chance ...


1

Use im2double instead of double if you want to use imhist. The imhist function expects double or single-precision data to be in the [0,1] data range, which is why you see everything in the last bin of the histogram.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible