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4

Regarding question 1: This is not what we observe, the drop is in all three panels at around 10^7 bins. What is happening here? Some complicated caching effect? Or is it something obvious that we missed? This drop is due to the limit you've set on the maximum number of blocks (1<<14 == 16384). At n=10^7 gpuBench2 the limit has kicked in, and each ...


4

Below is a function I implemented that acts as a bar3 replacement (partially). In my version, the bars are rendered by creating a patch graphics object: we build a matrix of vertex coordinates and a list of faces connecting those vertices. The idea is to first build a single "3d cube" as a template, then replicate it for as many bars as we have. Each bar ...


3

I don't have access to Octave, butI believe this should do the trick: Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; [H W] = size(Z); h = zeros( 1, numel(Z) ); ih = 1; for ix = 1:W fx = ix-.45; tx = ix+.45; for iy = 1:W fy = iy-.45; ty = iy+.45; vert = [ fx fy 0;... fx ty 0;... tx fy 0;... ...


3

OK. First of all, you should know exactly what a histogram is. It is not a plot of counts. It is a visualization for continuous variables that estimates the underlying probability density function. So do not try to use hist on categorical data. (That's why hist tells you that the value you pass must be numeric.) If you just want counts of discrete values, ...


3

You can simply take care of it at render time without any transforms or recalculating. Simply treat d.x as y-position, d.dy as width instead of height. Swapping between x and y might seem inappropriate, but it's totally reasonable. There are even examples of radial charts drawn this way too, using the x values to derive the angle of the bar and the y value ...


2

You can't use the $ operator because wealth and age are separate vectors. Also, a barplot might be better for this, unless you want a frequency or probability plot. > barplot(wealth, names.arg = age)


2

Something like this maybe: Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; [X,Y] = meshgrid(1:size(Z,1), 1:size(Z,2)); [Xi,Yi] = meshgrid(linspace(1,size(Z,1)), linspace(1,size(Z,2))); Zi = interp2(X,Y,Z,Xi,Yi,'nearest'); surf(Xi, Yi, Zi, 'FaceColor', 'flat','EdgeColor','none') colormap jet It's far from perfect but it's a start


2

No, there is no way to set the bin content in hist2d but there are two alternative options. 1) You can use bar3d to define the boundaries of each bin manually but it does not always render very well. hist,xbinedges,ybinedges = np.histogram2d(x,y,bins=bins,range=range) BinlowEdgex, BinlowEdgey = np.meshgrid(xbinedges[:-1], ybinedges[:-1]) xbinwidth = ...


2

I think you cannot do this with the clustered histogram style, because the gap option takes only integer numbers. In your case with only two columns, you can use the boxes plotting style and shift the boxes belonging to the first column by half of the boxwidth to the left, and the boxes of the second column by the same amount to the right: set auto x set ...


2

As already said above, wealth and age are separate atomic vectors, and are thus independent from each other. You might find it more useful to create a matrix or a dataframe to store your variables in, especially as the number of variables you have to work with increases. For instance: > myDF <- data.frame(wealth = c(100,150,200,240,300), age = ...


2

The intervals for computing the counts are different. Yours are centered at 0, 0.02, 0.04, and so on. Gnuplot's are centered at 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, and so on. Change your bin function to this: hist(x,width)=width*floor(x/width+0.5)


2

Assuming these are your data, you can display the frequencies using barplot. x <- c(1, 2, 21, 12, 0) names(x) <- c("1-3", "4-6", "7-10", "11-14", ">14") x # 1-3 4-6 7-10 11-14 >14 # 1 2 21 12 0 barplot(x) See also the documentation for function hist.


2

I believe that you must set the plot pen mode to bar mode, which is mode 1. set-plot-pen-mode 1


2

Have you looked at this toturial on bar3? Adapting it slightly: Z=[2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; % input data figure; h = bar3(Z); % get handle to graphics for k=1:numel(h), z=get(h(k),'ZData'); % old data - need for its NaN pattern nn = isnan(z); nz = kron( Z(:,k),ones(6,4) ); % map color to height 6 faces per data point nz(nn) = NaN; % ...


2

First, fill in your 16 bins without considering date at all. Then, sort the elements within each bin by date. Now, you can use binary search to efficiently locate a given year/month/week within each bin.


2

I think the following should do the trick. I didn't use anything more sophisticated than colormap, surf and patch, which to my knowledge should all work as-is in Octave. The code: %# Your data Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; %# the "nominal" bar (adjusted from cylinder()) n = 4; r = [0.5; 0.5]; m = length(r); theta = (0:n)/n*2*pi + pi/4; sintheta = ...


1

To avoid guessing the amplitude, call hist() with normed=True, then the amplitude corresponds to normpdf(). For doing a curve fit, I suggest to use not the density but the cumulative distribution: Each sample has a height of 1/N, which successively sum up to 1. This has the advantage that you don't need to group samples in bins. import numpy as np from ...


1

How about this? object Hist { type Bins = Map[Double, List[Double]] // artificially increasing bucket length to overcome last-point issue private val Epsilon = 0.000001 def histogram(data: List[Double], binsCount: Int) = { require(data.length > binsCount) val sorted = data.sorted val min = sorted.head ...


1

The lines are the median (solid line) and the interquartile range (dotted lines). The histograms just illustrate the frequencies of the sample values.


1

Here is a solution, employing the group_by functionality found in the link below: http://pastebin.com/c5WLWPbp import numpy as np dates = np.arange('2004-02', '2005-05', dtype='datetime64[D]') np.random.shuffle(dates) values = np.random.randint(40,200, len(dates)) years = np.array(dates, dtype='datetime64[Y]') months = np.array(dates, ...


1

In order to do this, there is a function in numpy, numpy.bincount. It is blazingly fast. It is so fast that you can create a bin for each integer (161 bins) and day (maybe 30000 different days?) resulting in a few million bins. The procedure: calculate an integer index for each bin (e.g. 17 x number of day from the first day in the file + (integer - ...


1

I think you want the probabilities of the intervals for which the histogram is computed: N = 100000; %// number of experiments b = 700:50:1300; %// bin centers mu = 1000; %// mean of distribution sigma = 100; %// standard deviation of distribution delta = (b(2)-b(1))/2; %// compute bin half-width pb = normcdf(b+delta,mu,sigma)-normcdf(b-delta,mu,sigma); ...


1

Try this wayne <- c(46, 49, 64, 70, 72, 73, 73, 77, 78, 79, 79, 79, 81, 81, 81, 81, 81, 82, 82, 84) breaks <- 7 # By doing this you can check if R is reading the value as numeric as shown in the next line is.numeric(breaks) # R should output "TRUE" and you can now plot your histogram although you should note that R decides the best number of breaks ...


1

This worked for me foo$c=factor(foo$b, levels = c("c","b","a")) foo <- foo[order(foo$c), ] barplot(height=foo$a,names.arg=foo$c)


1

So, your initial code would look like this from matplotlib import pyplot as plt import numpy as np # Produce a number of points in x-y from 1 distribution. mean = [3,4] cov = [[3,1],[1,3]] x,y = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean,cov,1000).T plt.plot(x,y,'x'); plt.axis('equal'); plt.show() Z = np.array([x,y]) # Produce 2D histogram projection ...


1

You can simply set the interpolation method that imshow uses: plt.imshow(H, interpolation = 'none') Here's an example showing different interpolation methods, and the docs list all implemented methods.


1

I think the simplest way would be to use a multiline title, optionally along with TeX formatting to de-emphasise the additional info. To make a multiline title, pass a cell array of strings like this: title({'\fontsize{16}Actual Title';'\fontsize{8}other info'}) Being consistent across the histograms, I think this would look tidier than having text on the ...


1

Is this more or less what you're asking for? library(ggplot2) library(scales) p11_age <- ggplot(Age_2011, aes(x=Age))+ geom_histogram(aes(y=..count../sum(..count..)), binwidth=1, origin=-0.5, fill=NA, color="black")+ scale_y_continuous(name="Frequency (%)", labels=percent_format())+ scale_x_continuous(name="Age ...


1

The filledcurves plotting style doesn't support color gradients, see Gnuplot filledcurves with palette. Since you have the same height for every bar, you can use the boxes plotting style: set style fill solid noborder plot 'data.dat' using 1:2:3 with boxes lc palette


1

This is a very good question actually! I was bothered by this all the time but finally your question has kicked me to finally solve it :-) Well, in this case we cannot simply do hist(x, xlim = c(100, 500), breaks = 9), as the breaks refer to the whole range of x, not related to xlim (in other words, xlim is used only for plotting, not for computing the ...



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