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129

yes, and its quick and simple though very hidden: binwidth=5 bin(x,width)=width*floor(x/width) plot 'datafile' using (bin($1,binwidth)):(1.0) smooth freq with boxes check out help smooth freq to see why the above makes a histogram to deal with ranges just set the xrange variable.


110

Here is an even simpler solution using base graphics and alpha-blending (which does not work on all graphics devices): set.seed(42) p1 <- hist(rnorm(500,4)) # centered at 4 p2 <- hist(rnorm(500,6)) # centered at 6 plot( p1, col=rgb(0,0,1,1/4), xlim=c(0,10)) # first histogram plot( p2, col=rgb(1,0,0,1/4), ...


66

If I understand your question correctly, then you probably want a density estimate along with the histogram: X <- c(rep(65, times=5), rep(25, times=5), rep(35, times=10), rep(45, times=4)) hist(X, prob=TRUE) # prob=TRUE for probabilities not counts lines(density(X)) # add a density estimate with defaults lines(density(X, adjust=2), ...


62

That image you linked to was for density curves, not histograms. If you've been reading on ggplot then maybe the only thing you're missing is combining your two data frames into one long one. So, let's start with something like what you have... carrots <- data.frame(length = rnorm(100000, 6, 2)) cukes <- data.frame(length = rnorm(50000, 7, 2.5)) ...


57

This is not a completely responsive answer but it is very simple. It illustrates an alternate method to display marginal densities and also how to use alpha levels for graphical output that supports transparency: scatter <- qplot(x,y, data=xy) + scale_x_continuous(limits=c(min(x),max(x))) + scale_y_continuous(limits=c(min(y),max(y))) ...


54

I have a couple corrections/additions to Born2Smile's very useful answer: Empty bins caused the box for the adjacent bin to incorrectly extend into its space; avoid this using set boxwidth binwidth In Born2Smile's version, bins are rendered as centered on their lower bound. Strictly they ought to extend from the lower bound to the upper bound. This can ...


52

You can have a look at Chronoscope or flot. Other libraries: Protchart (no longer under active development, recommends D3.js) JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit gRaphaël based on Raphaël Bluff DojoX Data Chart Ajax.org Google Chart API Style Chart JS Charts jqPlot pChart ExtJS Vizualize TufteGraph milkchart jQChart PlotKit Timeplot flotr Highcharts Rickshaw


52

Python 3.x does have reduce, you just have to do a from functools import reduce. It also has "dict comprehensions", which have exactly the syntax in your example. Python 2.7 and 3.x also have a Counter class which does exactly what you want: from collections import Counter cnt = Counter("abracadabra") In Python 2.6 or earlier, I'd personally use a ...


42

This is a post about a super quick-and-dirty way to create a histogram in MySQL for numeric values. There are multiple other ways to create histograms that are better and more flexible, using CASE statements and other types of complex logic. This method wins me over time and time again since it's just so easy to modify for each use case, and ...


37

Sure! To set the ticks, just, well... Set the ticks (see matplotlib.pyplot.xticks or ax.set_xticks). (Also, you don't need to manually set the facecolor of the patches. You can just pass in a keyword argument.) For the rest, you'll need to do some slightly more fancy things with the labeling, but matplotlib makes it fairly easy. As an example: import ...


37

A bin is range that represents the width of a single bar of the histogram along the X-axis. You could also call this the interval. (Wikipedia defines them more formally as "disjoint categories".) The Numpy histogram function doesn't draw the histogram, but it computes the occurrences of input data that fall within each bin, which in turns determines the ...


35

Here you have a working example: import random import numpy from matplotlib import pyplot x = [random.gauss(3,1) for _ in range(400)] y = [random.gauss(4,2) for _ in range(400)] bins = numpy.linspace(-10, 10, 100) pyplot.hist(x, bins, alpha=0.5, label='x') pyplot.hist(y, bins, alpha=0.5, label='y') pyplot.legend(loc='upper right') pyplot.show()


35

The gridExtra package should work here. Start by making each of the ggplot objects: hist_top <- ggplot()+geom_histogram(aes(rnorm(100))) empty <- ggplot()+geom_point(aes(1,1), colour="white")+ opts(axis.ticks=theme_blank(), panel.background=theme_blank(), axis.text.x=theme_blank(), axis.text.y=theme_blank(), ...


31

Comparing histograms is quite a subject in itself. You've got two big classes of comparison functions : bin-to-bin comparison and cross-bin comparison. Bin-to-bin comparison : As you stated, standard sum of differences is quite bad. There's an improvement, the Chi-squared distance, that says that if H1.red[0] = 0.001 and H2.red[0] = 0.011 is muchmore ...


30

Actually, it's quite easy: instead of the number of bins you can give a list with the bin boundaries. They can be unequally distributed, too: plt.hist(data, bins = [0,10,20,30,40,50,100]) If you just want them equally distributed, you can simply use range: plt.hist(data, bins = range(min,max+binwidth,binwidth))


27

A histogram is a poor-man's density estimate. Note that in your call to hist() using default arguments, you get frequencies not probabilities -- add ,prob=TRUE to the call if you want probabilities. As for the log axis problem, don't use 'x' if you do not want the x-axis transformed: plot(mydata_hist$count, log="y", type='h', lwd=10, lend=2) gets you ...


26

Be very careful: all of the answers on this page are implicitly taking the decision of where the binning starts - the left-hand edge of the left-most bin, if you like - out of the user's hands. If the user is combining any of these functions for binning data with his/her own decision about where binning starts (as is done on the blog which is linked to ...


25

hist works on a collection of values and computes and draws the histogram from them. In your case you already precalculated the frequency of each group (letter). To represent your data in an histogram form use better matplotlib bar: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt alphab = ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F'] frequencies = [23, 44, 12, 11, 2, ...


25

Simply using the freq=F argument does not give a histogram with percentages, it normalizes the histogram so the total area equals 1. To get a histogram of percentages of some data set, say x, do: h = hist(x) h$density = h$counts/sum(h$counts)*100 plot(h,freq=F) Basically what you are doing is creating a histogram object, changing the density property to ...


25

Yes, there is, although it's a little more challenging on iOS than you'd think. This is a red histogram generated and plotted entirely on the GPU, running against a live video feed: Tommy's suggestion in the question you link is a great starting point, as is this paper by Scheuermann and Hensley. What's suggested there is to use scattering to build up a ...


24

No, because the histograms simply plot the number of pixels of various tones, not their locations.


22

Histogram equalization is a non-linear process. Channel splitting and equalizing each channel separately is not the proper way for equalization of contrast. Equalization involves Intensity values of the image not the color components. So for a simple RGB color image, HE should not be applied individually on each channel. Rather, it should be applied such ...


21

Here's a function I wrote that uses pseudo-transparency to represent overlapping histograms plotOverlappingHist <- function(a, b, colors=c("white","gray20","gray50"), breaks=NULL, xlim=NULL, ylim=NULL){ ahist=NULL bhist=NULL if(!(is.null(breaks))){ ahist=hist(a,breaks=breaks,plot=F) ...


20

One addition, just to save some searching time for people doing this after us. Legends, axis labels, axis texts, ticks make the plots drifted away from each other, so your plot will look ugly and inconsistent. You can correct this by using some of these theme settings, +theme(legend.position = "none", axis.title.x = element_blank(), ...


19

Nice question. I've managed to make it work using the boxes style as opposed to the histogram style you were originally using. I don't think that should make too much of a difference though: set boxwidth 1 set grid set style fill solid 1.0 border -1 set yrange [0:*] set xrange [-.5:*] set xtics border in scale 0,10 nomirror rotate by -45 plot ...


18

Stack Overflow uses Flot for the zoomable time-series chart in the Reputation tab of user profiles. You may want to check these links for further information on Flot: Flot Project Time-series example with zooming overview Flot Usage: Sites and projects using Flot


18

If you have MMA V8 you could use the new DistributionFitTest disFitObj = DistributionFitTest[daList, NormalDistribution[a, b],"HypothesisTestData"]; Show[ SmoothHistogram[daList], Plot[PDF[disFitObj["FittedDistribution"], x], {x, 0, 120}, PlotStyle -> Red ], PlotRange -> All ] disFitObj["FittedDistributionParameters"] (* ...


18

Here's a little snippet of Rcpp that bins data very efficiently - on my computer it takes about a second to bin 100,000,000 observations: library(Rcpp) cppFunction(' std::vector<int> bin3(NumericVector x, double width, double origin = 0) { int bin, nmissing = 0; std::vector<int> out; NumericVector::iterator x_it = x.begin(), ...


17

Another option would be to use the ggplot2 package. ggplot(mydata, aes(x = V3)) + geom_histogram() + scale_x_log()


17

Sure is! You just need to reset the tick labels. EDIT with answer and picture (can be done similarly with hist): x = scipy.arange(4) y = scipy.array([4,7,6,5]) f = pylab.figure() ax = f.add_axes([0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 0.8]) ax.bar(x, y, align='center') ax.set_xticks(x) ax.set_xticklabels(['Aye', 'Bee', 'Cee', 'Dee']) f.show()



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