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3

There are a few issues I can see Your binSize calculation is wrong Your binning algorithm is one sided, and should be two sided You aren't incrementing the proper bin when you find a match 1. binsize calculation bin size = your range / number of bins 2. two sided binning if (src_pic_point[x] <= z*binSize) you need a two sided range of values, ...


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Here are two possible approaches, depending on what you want: Solution A Just draw a semitransparent rectangle for each data point. Example: http://bl.ocks.org/anonymous/be1b4d11d420bcfc76a6a2005d0b2fe5 Solution B var data = d3.layout.histogram().bins(x.ticks(20))(values); just generates data, and not the chart. You can use that data to make a ...


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To solve both of your problems, I suggest using hist (Note if you have a version above 2010b, you should use histogram instead) instead of histfit to first get the values of your histogram and then doing a regression and plotting them: n=10^6; b=10^2; x=(1./(2-(rand(1,n)))); [counts,centers]=hist(x,b); density = counts./trapz(centers, counts); %// Thanks ...


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1. Better result can be obtained by using ksdensity and specifying the support of the distribution. 2. By using hist you have access to the counts and centers, thus the normalization to get density is straightforward. Code to demonstrate the suggestions: rng(125) n=10^6; b=10^2; x=(1./(2-(rand(1,n)))); subplot(1,2,1) a = histfit(x,b,'kernel'); ...


2

> table(my_table) my_table 1 2 5 10 11 14 15 17 18 20 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 The downside is that table does not allow any adjustment of the bin size. In your case the fit with requirements is perfect, since you asked for a bin size of 1. cut allows the specification of bin-boundaries and even lets you choose whether it is the left or right ...


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You can convert the result of table to a data frame and then use ggplot: df <- as.data.frame(table(d$letter)) ggplot(df, aes(x = Freq)) + geom_histogram(binwidth = 1) This works because the column containing the frequencies is by default called Freq: head(df) ## Var1 Freq ## 1 a 3 ## 2 b 3 ## 3 c 1 ## 4 d 4 ## 5 e ...


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@armatita is right about the problem being the data. I think it all comes down to how you do your binning inside histogram2d. See if this example with a random lognormal distribution helps. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt n = 1000 x = np.logspace(2, 10, n) y = x**1.5 y = y * np.random.lognormal(10, 3, n) x_bins = ...


2

The stack trace you posted says your out of range index is 1. The exception isn't thrown where you think it is. getPixel(int x, int y, int[] iarray) fills iarray with the intensity values of the pixel. If you are using an rgb image, there will be at least three intensity values for each channel, if you are using rgb with alpha there will be 4 intensity ...


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This can be done with a loop like follows: yHistData = [] for j = 1:NumberOfLayers push!(yHistData, hist(DataSet[j], Bins)) end push! modifies the array by adding the specified element to the end. This increases code speed because we do not need to create copies of the array all the time. This code is nice and simple, and runs faster than yours. The ...


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The calcHist function accepts a mask parameter. You can create a mask with this properties that you mentioned and pass it to the function. I suggest you to create something that analyse the pixels once... but an easy way to do it would be: h,s,v = cv2.split(img) mask = (v == 0) + (v == 100) + (s == 0) mask = numpy.logical_not(mask) Then you can use your ...


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The problem is related with differing values in panel.args.common(i.e., the arguments common to all the panel functions, see ?trellis.object). Here is some sample code to clarify my point. library(lattice) ## paneled plot hist1 <- histogram( ~ Sepal.Width | Species, data = iris) hist1$panel.args.common # $breaks # [1] 1.904 2.228 2.552 2.876 3.200 ...


2

What do you mean by "the linear SVM accept only 2 features for each sample"? You may be confused on how the SVM function accepts its training data. Here's a quick example of how I use it: First, lets train an SVM model using fitcsvm using 500 samples of random data (the rows in the training data matrix), each with 1000 elements (the columns in the training ...


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You can do it with the cut function: df.groupby(pd.cut(df['purity.score'], bins=10)).count() Here, cut is dividing df['purity.score'] into 10 bins of its choice, but you can define the bin boundaries by passing an array.


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Try changing your last two lines to: ax.fill_between(bincenters, 0, N, interpolate=True, where=((bincenters>=np.percentile(bincenters, 10)) & (bincenters<=np.percentile(bincenters, 90)))) I believe you want to call np.percentile on bincenters since that is your effective x-axis. The other difference is ...


2

There are not three, but only one variable to 'unpack', hence the error (see below for detail). You can probably do without the for loop because df.hist() has a layout parameter that allows you to define the same using your (n_row, n_col) parameters. df = pd.DataFrame(data=np.random.random(size=(50, 6)), columns=[i for i in string.ascii_lowercase[:6]]) ...


1

Like this? library(ggplot2) DF=data.frame(time=rep(LETTERS[1:4],each=100),values=rnorm(400,5,2)) ggplot(DF, aes(x=values)) + geom_histogram() + facet_wrap(~time,ncol=4)+ coord_flip()+ theme_classic()


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Considering PavoDive suggestion, following graph did the job: ggplot(my_bd, aes(Year)) + geom_freqpoly(aes(y = ..count..),binwidth = 1, center = 1980) + scale_x_continuous(limits = c(1980,2015))


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The first step in asking a question on Stack Overflow is to create a reproducible example. That is a small example that users can input into their computers to test, diagnose, and solve your issue. It not only helps others but it also enables you to properly assess your problem and potentially find a solution while creating the example. Example We use the ...


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library(ggplot2) dtDataset = data.frame( V1 = c('a','b'), V2 = runif(20) ) ggplot(dtDataset) + geom_density(aes(x = V2, group = V1), position = 'stack')


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I would process the data to determine the height you need. Something along the lines of: sort(table(cut(df$X1,breaks=10)),T)[2] Working from the inside out cut will bin the data (not really needed with integer data like you have but probably needed with real data table then creates a table with the count of each of those bins sort sorts the table from ...


1

I am not sure how ggplot builds its histograms, but one method would be to grab the results from hist: maxDensities <- sapply(df, function(i) max(hist(i)$density)) # take the second highest peak: myYlim <- rev(sort(maxDensities))[2]


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Don't use getPixel(), but getSample(). So your code would be: final int valueBefore = img.getRaster().getSample(x, y, 0) ; or even histogram[img.getRaster().getSample(x, y, 0)]++ ; Btw, you may want to check the image type first in order to determine the number of channels/bands and do this process for each channel.


1

I prefer to use this: plot(density(my_table$xcat)) This also makes it easier to overlay other frequencies, e.g.: my_table$xcatNew <- c(1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,11,12,14,14,14,14, 15,15,15, 17,17,17, 18,18,18,18,20,20) plot(density(my_table$xcat)) lines(density(my_table$xcatNew), col = "red")


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You just need to change the argument in plot plot(b,freq=FALSE)


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Perhaps I don't understand what exactly you are trying to do since I don't know what your data looks like, but it seems wrong to have your contourf plot sharing the same axis as your bar3d plot. If you add an axis without the 3D projection to a new figure, you should be able to make a contourf plot just fine using hist. An example using data from a random, ...


1

How about something like the following? V1 <- rnorm(50) V2 <- rnorm(50) all.data <- data.frame(V1, V2) My_function <- function(x) for(i in 1:ncol(x)) { hist(x[,i], main = paste("Histogram of",colnames(x)[i])) } My_function(all.data) Note that i now represents the column number, rather than the values in the column itself.


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It's fairly straightforward: you just overplot a bar histogram, with the appropriate colour, and ensure the linewidth (lw) is zero. For example (I don't have your dataset, obviously): import numpy as np from matplotlib import pyplot as plt N = 1e5 lum = 10**10.5 * np.random.normal(loc=1, scale=1, size=1e5) lum = np.log10(lum) dist = ...


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Just a suggestion to pick up your curiosity. Although @lanery clearly answers the question, I would like to share a different method of getting a nice 2d histogram in python. Instead of using np.histogram2d, which in general produces quite ugly histograms, I would like to recycle py-sphviewer, a python package for rendering particle simulations using an ...


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I believe that this will accomplish what you want: set xlabel "Number of threads" set ylabel "Execution time" set style fill solid 1.0 noborder set boxwidth 0.7 set xtics ("1" 19.5) set for[i=2:12] xtics add (sprintf("%d",i) (i-1)*55+19.5) set key top right set xrange[-15:660] plot for [i=0:2] for [j=0:9] 'test.dat' using ($0*55+j+i*15):1 every ...


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Your code is, as it stands, rather poorly constructed, and this is clouding the problem. The first problem is whitespace. You need some. The next is the with the lines for column in 'X': and for column in 'V':. These two for loops are useless and they can be replaced with: cell_name_1="X{}".format(row) #X variable cell_name_2="V{}".format(row) #V ...



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