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2

Just shift the titles belonging to the newhistogram up a bit with: set style histogram rowstacked title offset 0,1 (the rest of the script remains unchanged).


2

Its probably due to the wrong use of max and min. You are doing min(img) and that will give you an array of the minimum of each row. if you want the absolute minimum of the whole image, you should call min(img(:)) Therefore, change your line to: img=(img-min(img(:)))/(max(img(:))-min(img(:)))*255 Note that its just 1 line. In Matlab you don't need to ...


1

I like @Christoph's answer, but here are a couple of other workarounds: 1) You can change the xlabel to "\nUtilization", which will add a newline and move the text to the next row. 2) You can also use a regular label and turn off the xlabel, which can allow more flexibility: unset xlabel set label "Utilization" at graph 0.5,0.1 font ",18"


1

Found this thread while doing some searching. The ImageEn component suite has a THistogramBox component. It's the prettiest thing in the world, but it's the only one I've found so far. http://www.imageen.com


1

I will try to answer B. I don't know if there is a parameter that would let you do B) but you can manually define a function to do that for you. I.e.: library(ggplot2) X <- c(rnorm(1000, mean = 0.5, sd = 0.2), rnorm(10, mean = 10, sd = 0.5)) Data <- data.frame(table(cut(X, breaks=c(seq(0,1, by=0.05), max(X))))) #the function will remove one ...


1

The capability to control this property is available in MatPlotLib 1.4. So, I recommend upgrading; for example if you use pip: pip install --upgrade matplotlib Then use the joinstyle keyword argument (['miter' | 'round' | 'bevel']) in your calls to hist; e.g.: ax0.hist(x, 20, normed=1, histtype='step', facecolor='g', alpha=0.75, linewidth=4., ...


1

That is actually the annoying default in ggplot2: library(ggplot2) ggplot(iris, aes(x=Sepal.Length, fill=Species)) + geom_histogram()


1

With base plotting, you might be better off cutting the vector first, and then using barplot or the plot method for tables. For example: K <- rnorm(10000, mean=100, sd = 100) K.cut <- cut(K, c(-Inf, 20, 50, 75, 100, 400, Inf)) plot(table(K.cut), xaxt='n', ylab='K') axis(1, at=1:6, labels=c('< 20', '20-50', '50-75', '75-100', '100-400', '> ...


1

ggplot graphs try to behave intelligently depending on the type of the variables in the aesthetic (x,y,fill etc). But the default can't always get it right. In this case, your x-axes have different types: price is an integer but carat is numeric. If you want to override the default behavior, just use as.numeric/ as.integer/ as.factor/ etc. : ggplot(... ...


1

Thanks for the responses. I realized that I wanted a barplot rather than a histogram. Here is the solution that I came up with: smoke=read.csv("SmokingEffect.csv",header=TRUE) smokes=subset(smoke,select=c(Age,Smoke,FEV)) library(plyr) smokesmeans <- ddply(smokes, c("Age","Smoke"), summarize, mean=mean(FEV), sem=sd(FEV)/sqrt(length(FEV))) smokesmeans ...


1

Histograms are usually used when you have a single vector (like lung capacity) and you want to show the distribution of values: library(ggplot2) foo <- data.frame(age=runif(1000,min=10,max=50), capacity=rnorm(1000,mean=10)) ggplot(foo, aes(capacity))+geom_histogram(fill="blue") If you want to plot the relationship between two variables, scatter plot ...



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