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3

Are you wanting to place a bar with a fixed width at the center of each bin? If so, try something something similar to this: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt data = [0,2,30,40,50,10,50,40,150,70,150,10,3,70,70,90,10,2] bins = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100,200] counts, _ = np.histogram(data, bins) centers = ...


2

Change the scales to free on both axes: facet_grid(variable~len, scales="free") (instead of "free_y") For your second question, the entries are coerced to a factor vector, and the order happens to have entries with length 10 come before length 9. You can reorder them by reordering the levels in the oligo factor. If you want to do it based on the len ...


2

Here you go, with seaborn, as you please. But you have to understand that seaborn itself uses matplotlib to create plots. AND: Please delete your other question, now it really is a duplicate. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import seaborn as sns sns.set_palette("deep", desat=.6) sns.set_context(rc={"figure.figsize": (8, 4)}) data = ...


2

Here's an attempt to the best of my understanding on the question. # sample data DF = read.table(text=" convergence rules fact time 1 1 domain 1802 8629 2 1 domain 1802 8913 3 1 rdfs 595 249 4 1 domain 1 9259 5 1 videcom 1 9071 6 2 domain 314151 9413 7 2 ...


2

What you are seeing is that some of the bins are empty, so it draws a rectangle that goes from f(y) -> 0 -> f(y+delta) -> 0 -> f(y+2*delta). A common trick to get around this is not to use a sharp cutoff as your bin (we call it a kernal). You can use, for example, Kernel density estimation to "smooth" out the histogram. In this case you place a ...


2

The docs show that if you want to explicitly provide bins, they should be provided with the bins keyword argument, i.e. H, x, y = np.histogram2d(Xg[1:len(Xg)],vol[1:len(vol)], bins=[XgBins, volBins])


1

If some of the bins are empty you can filter them out with boolean indexing: p.plot(bincenters[y>0],y[y>0],'-')


1

If you're ok with ggplot2, you can do it as follows: library(reshape2) library(ggplot2) 1: Rearrange the dataframe to change A,B,C, to factors: dat3 <- melt(dat2, varnames = c('A','B','C')) 2: Plot using the factors: ( qplot(data=dat3, value, fill=variable, position = 'dodge') Can't say too many good things about ggplot2


1

Here are two ways. In base R: barplot(t(as.matrix(data)),beside=TRUE, col=c("red","green","blue"),names=rownames(data)) Using ggplot. library(ggplot2) library(reshape2) gg <- melt(data.frame(id=rownames(data),data),id="id") gg$id <- factor(gg$id,levels=unique(gg$id)) ...


1

It seems to me that you can indeed do this using just Gnuplot, I just did it. The solution I used can be found here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11092650/448700


1

You need to use the weights aesthetic. This weights the count of each bin by the value of the bin. ggplot(w, aes(x=rules, weights=time)) + geom_bar() + facet_grid(convergence ~ .) + geom_text(stat="bin", aes(label=..count..), color="red", vjust=-0.1) In order for the text to work, we need to use stat="bin", which is the same as what geom_bar() is ...



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