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11

This might be a bit late, but I decided to make a package (ggExtra) for this since it involved a bit of code and can be tedious to write. The package also tries to address some common issue such as ensuring that even if there is a title or the text is enlarged, the plots will still be inline with one another. The basic idea is similar to what the answers ...


10

For anyone coming across this question: Since pandas 0.14, plotting with bars has a 'width' command: https://github.com/pydata/pandas/pull/6644 The example above can now be solved simply by using df.plot(kind='bar', stacked=True, width=1)


7

The problem is that for both layers the cumulative sum is calculated over the whole x-axis. ggplot(df)+ geom_histogram(aes(x= POS, y=ifelse(x>=0, rev(cumsum(rev(..count..)))/4, 0)), binwidth = 1)+ geom_histogram(aes(x= NEG, y=ifelse(x<=0, ...


7

The example below uses several techniques to create an RGB histogram of an arbitrary image: The Raster method getSamples() extracts the values of each color band from the BufferedImage. The HistogramDataset method addSeries() adds each band's counts to the dataset. A StandardXYBarPainter replaces the ChartFactory default, as shown here. A custom ...


7

x is between 0 and 1. In order for e to be between low and high, you need: e=(high-low)*x+low;


7

In terms of calculating the histogram, the computation of the frequency per intensity is correct though there is a slight error... more on that later. Also, I would personally avoid using loops here. See my small note at the end of this post. Nevertheless, there are three problems with your code: Problem #1 - Histogram is not initialized properly ...


6

Without sample data, it's always difficult to get reproducible results, so i've created a sample dataset set.seed(16) mydata <- data.frame(myvariable=rnorm(500, 1500000, 10000)) #base histogram hist(mydata$myvariable) As you've learned, hist() is a generic function. If you want to see the different implementations you can type methods(hist). Most of ...


6

1. Reaching 18. It appears that in your data you have at most 17 numbers in the category between 52.5 and 61.5. And that is even with open interval on both sides: sum(ages >= 52.5 & ages <= 61.5) [1] 17 So your histogram only reflects that. 2. Break symbol. For that you might be interested in THIS SO ANSWER 3. Breaks. If you read help(hist) ...


6

Using some simulated data this should get you what you want. The key is that you have to create your bivariate bins, accomplished using the cuts() function. Then treating the binned factors as levels we can then count the combinations of each factor level using the table() function: library(plot3D) ## Simulate data: set.seed(2002) x <- rnorm(1000) y ...


6

This goes against my policy in answering questions without any effort made by the question poser, but this seems like an interesting question, so I'll make an exception. First, split up each of the Time and Trial fields so that they're in separate arrays. For the Trial fields, I'm going to convert them into labels 1 and 2 to denote correct and incorrect ...


6

This is not a histogram. You've already aggregated the counts by date. barplot(df$steps, names = df$date, xlab = "Date", ylab = "Steps", main = "Your title here")


5

By default, ggplot uses range/30 as binwidth, as prompted. In your case, it is approximately 48/30 (depends on the seed), which is more than 1 and is around 1.5. Now, your data is not continuous, you only get integers, so for any two adjacent histogram bins you'll get irregularities, caused by the fact that the first bin will only contain one possible ...


5

As far as I can tell, pandas can't handle this situation. That's ok since all of their plotting methods are for convenience only. You'll need to use matplotlib directly. Here's how I do it: %matplotlib inline import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas #import seaborn #seaborn.set(style='ticks') np.random.seed(0) df = ...


5

To get values actually plotted you can use function ggplot_build() where argument is your plot. p <- ggplot(mtcars,aes(mpg))+geom_histogram()+ facet_wrap(~cyl)+geom_vline(data=data.frame(x=c(20,30)),aes(xintercept=x)) pg <- ggplot_build(p) This will make list and one of sublists is named data. This sublist contains dataframe with values used ...


5

The cause of error is because your image is RGB and imhist does not deal with that. To work around this you can either use a single channel: imhist(YourImage(:,:,Channel)); or convert from RGB to grayscale: imhist(rgb2gray(YourImage)); That should work fine now.


5

That is actually the annoying default in ggplot2: library(ggplot2) ggplot(iris, aes(x=Sepal.Length, fill=Species)) + geom_histogram()


5

Already beautiful answers are there, but I thought of adding this. Looks good to me. (Copied random numbers from @Dirk). library(scales) is needed` set.seed(42) hist(rnorm(500,4),xlim=c(0,10),col='skyblue',border=F) hist(rnorm(500,6),add=T,col=scales::alpha('red',.5),border=F) The result is... Update: This overlapping function may also be useful to ...


5

The general way to get the second digit (even for cases when numbers can be greater than 99) is n / 10 % 10 Note that for -11 it will return -1. If you want 1, then do (n >= 0 ? n : -n) / 10 % 10


5

Pretty sure you can just use cumulative=-1 in your function call: plt.hist(d, 50, histtype="stepfilled", alpha=.7, cumulative=-1) From the matplotlib hist() docs: If cumulative evaluates to less than 0 (e.g., -1), the direction of accumulation is reversed. Take a look at the third example image here; I think it does what you want.


5

What you are plotting is a histogram of added-up ASCII values for white-space delimited strings in a text file. Following the name I assume it is a dictionary of English words. English is mainly written in lower-case letters, which have ASCII-codes from 97 (a) to 122 (z), on average 110 (disregarding letter frequencies). The histogram shows peaks at ...


5

if you want to find the histogram use numpy import numpy as np np.histogram([-3.2, 0, 1, 1.5, 1.6, 1.9, 5, 6, 9, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 5, 6.7, 9],4)


5

You can have as many shared memory declarations as you like. However, the runtime only allocates a single shared memory buffer, and each shared memory array will be allocated the same address (i.e. the starting address of the shared memory allocation). So, for example, this: #include <cstdio> extern __shared__ int a[]; extern __shared__ int b[]; ...


4

This is probably when you want to use matplotlib's object-oriented interface. There are a couple ways that you could handle this. First, you could want each plot on an entirely separate figure. In which case, matplotlib lets you keep track of various figures. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt a = np.random.normal(size=200) b = ...


4

A solution for histograms is as follows: import pylab as pl N, bins, patches = pl.hist(pl.rand(1000), 20) jet = pl.get_cmap('jet', len(patches)) for i in range(len(patches)): patches[i].set_facecolor(jet(i)) Result: I hope that's what you are looking for.


4

geom_histogram() uses stat_bin() to divide your data in bins. Default value for stat_bin() is right=FALSE that means that class start with value including and end with value not including this value, for example, class 0.9-1 will include 0.9 but won't include 1. To change this to oposite direction just add right=TRUE to geom_histogram(). ...


4

Here is the code which draws histogram of each color channels of an image. I=imread('lena.png'); r=I(:,:,1); g=I(:,:,2); b=I(:,:,3); totalNumofPixel=size(I,1)*size(I,2); FrequencyofRedValues=zeros(256,1); FrequencyofGreenValues=zeros(256,1); FrequencyofBlueValues=zeros(256,1); for x=0:255 FrequencyofRedValues(x+1)=size(r(r==x),1); // number of ...


4

Try this: par(mfrow = c(2, 2)) tapply(iris$Sepal.Length, iris$Species, hist) however, for multi-panel plots you might find the lattice or ggplot2 plackages more suitable. library(lattice) histogram(~ Sepal.Length | Species, iris) library(ggplot2) ggplot(iris, aes(Sepal.Length)) + geom_histogram() + facet_wrap(~ Species)


4

Here is a different algorithm for your question: im = imread('lena.png'); % imshow(im); histogram(im) function histogram(im) [rowSize, colSize, rgb] = size(im); nshades = 256; hist = zeros(rgb, nshades); figure, RGB = ['r', 'g', 'b']; names = [{'Red Channel'}, {'Green Channel'}, {'Blue ...


4

Fitting a distribution function does not happen by magic. You have to do it explicitly. One way is using fitdistr(...) in the MASS package. library(MASS) # for fitsidtr(...) # excellent fit (of course...) ggplot(df, aes(x = x)) + geom_histogram(aes(y=..density..),colour = "black", fill = "white", binwidth = 0.01)+ ...


4

In order to have ggplot2 showing a guide (a legend) you need to map something to the respective scale. This is done in aes (or aes_string in this case). color <- factor(color) library(ggplot2) m <- ggplot(returns.data.frame) + theme_bw() for (i in seq(1,3)) { m <- m + stat_bin( aes_string(x = hist.name.list[[i]], y = ...



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