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1

if you don't want vertical lines remove this: var x_axis = new Rickshaw.Graph.Axis.X({ graph: graph, tickFormat: function(x){ return (new Date(x)).toLocaleString(); } }); from your code. follow this:http://code.shutterstock.com/rickshaw/tutorial/introduction.html


0

After further Googling, I came across the cran package landsat. It has histmatch() and relnorm() functions to do just this. ?histmatch() explains it all perfectly with examples.


1

You'll want to just set the y values for your labels as well (and also make sure you're using the same bins are you are for the bars) library(scales) p <- ggplot(mtcars, aes(x = hp)) + geom_bar(aes(y = (..count..)/sum(..count..)), binwidth = 25) + scale_y_continuous(labels = percent_format()) #version 3.0.9 ...


1

You need to use the weights aesthetic. This weights the count of each bin by the value of the bin. ggplot(w, aes(x=rules, weights=time)) + geom_bar() + facet_grid(convergence ~ .) + geom_text(stat="bin", aes(label=..count..), color="red", vjust=-0.1) In order for the text to work, we need to use stat="bin", which is the same as what geom_bar() is ...


2

Here's an attempt to the best of my understanding on the question. # sample data DF = read.table(text=" convergence rules fact time 1 1 domain 1802 8629 2 1 domain 1802 8913 3 1 rdfs 595 249 4 1 domain 1 9259 5 1 videcom 1 9071 6 2 domain 314151 9413 7 2 ...


-1

You could use ddply in the plyr package to transform the data (i.e. do the summation), and send the result to ggplot. library(ggplot2) library(plyr) N <- 10^4 my_df <- data.frame(convergence=sample(c("domain", "videocom", "rdfs"), size=N, replace=T), rules=sample(c(1, 595, 1802), size=N, replace=T), ...


2

Here you go, with seaborn, as you please. But you have to understand that seaborn itself uses matplotlib to create plots. AND: Please delete your other question, now it really is a duplicate. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import seaborn as sns sns.set_palette("deep", desat=.6) sns.set_context(rc={"figure.figsize": (8, 4)}) data = ...


2

Change the scales to free on both axes: facet_grid(variable~len, scales="free") (instead of "free_y") For your second question, the entries are coerced to a factor vector, and the order happens to have entries with length 10 come before length 9. You can reorder them by reordering the levels in the oligo factor. If you want to do it based on the len ...


3

Are you wanting to place a bar with a fixed width at the center of each bin? If so, try something something similar to this: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt data = [0,2,30,40,50,10,50,40,150,70,150,10,3,70,70,90,10,2] bins = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100,200] counts, _ = np.histogram(data, bins) centers = ...


2

The docs show that if you want to explicitly provide bins, they should be provided with the bins keyword argument, i.e. H, x, y = np.histogram2d(Xg[1:len(Xg)],vol[1:len(vol)], bins=[XgBins, volBins])


1

It seems to me that you can indeed do this using just Gnuplot, I just did it. The solution I used can be found here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11092650/448700


0

When plotting the histogram, the X-axis serves as our “bins”. If we construct a histogram with 256 bins, then we are effectively counting the number of times each pixel value occurs. In contrast, if we use only 2 (equally spaced) bins, then we are counting the number of times a pixel is in the range [0, 128) or [128, 255]. The number of pixels binned to ...


1

Here are two ways. In base R: barplot(t(as.matrix(data)),beside=TRUE, col=c("red","green","blue"),names=rownames(data)) Using ggplot. library(ggplot2) library(reshape2) gg <- melt(data.frame(id=rownames(data),data),id="id") gg$id <- factor(gg$id,levels=unique(gg$id)) ...


1

If you're ok with ggplot2, you can do it as follows: library(reshape2) library(ggplot2) 1: Rearrange the dataframe to change A,B,C, to factors: dat3 <- melt(dat2, varnames = c('A','B','C')) 2: Plot using the factors: ( qplot(data=dat3, value, fill=variable, position = 'dodge') Can't say too many good things about ggplot2


2

What you are seeing is that some of the bins are empty, so it draws a rectangle that goes from f(y) -> 0 -> f(y+delta) -> 0 -> f(y+2*delta). A common trick to get around this is not to use a sharp cutoff as your bin (we call it a kernal). You can use, for example, Kernel density estimation to "smooth" out the histogram. In this case you place a ...


1

If some of the bins are empty you can filter them out with boolean indexing: p.plot(bincenters[y>0],y[y>0],'-')


1

This can be done with some string manipulation monkey business. But you will need to display the resulting text strings with a monospaced font. In many fonts, space characters take less space that star characters, so the zero-points won't line up right if you display these strings of stars that way. First, the expression IF(value<0, -value, 0) will ...


0

Just moving my comment to an answer. This is really easy in ggplot using facet_wrap. library(ggplot2) ggplot(df, aes(x = y)) + geom_histogram() + facet_wrap(~ a + b + c) Displaying the graphs in different windows won't be built-in with ggplot. For that, I would probably #create a grouping variable df$group = paste(df$a, df$b, df$c) # split the ...


0

Complementing RobP's answer, to get the histogram, add this before the main function's end: for(int i = 4; i < 24; i++) { System.out.println("Result: " + i + " has got " + results[i] + " hit(s)"); } I also notice you're not accessing the rolls array. You just use its size to limit your for's iterations. for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) would ...


0

Change to an array like this. One could use SparseArray since indices 0, 1, 2, 3 are never used but it doesn't seem worth it to me. I made the array 25 long (24 + 1) so that results[x] holds the number of times a dice roll of x occurred. import java.util.Scanner; import java.util.Random; import java.util.Scanner; import java.lang.Math; public class ...


1

What you're describing doesn't sound like a histogram (which is a very specific plot for continuous random variables to estimate the kernel density); sounds like you just want a bar chart. I believe this is what you're looking for myDF <- data.frame( ref=c("A","A","A","C","C","C","G","G","G","T","T","T"), ...


0

If you wanted to get the tick label at 0 bold too, you have to specify all the tick locations manually, so you can easily omit 0: set.seed(101) hist(runif(100,-500,500), axes=FALSE) axis(side=1, at=seq(-500, 500, 100)[-6]) # omit 0 (the 6th element of the sequence) axis(side=1, at=0, lwd=0, lwd.ticks=par("lwd"), font=2) You could also combine this with ...


2

How about: set.seed(101) hist(runif(100,-500,500)) axis(side=1,lwd=0,lwd.ticks=4,at=0,lend=1,labels=FALSE,tcl=-1) Specify lend=1 to get the line end not to extend above the axis. See par for more information about tcl and lend.


0

Your data is already binned, and so the easiest way to get an R Histogram object from this data set is to use the PreBinnedHistogram function from the HistogramTools package on CRAN. This function takes a list of breakpoints (column 1 in your example) and counts of each bin (column 2) and returns a proper R histogram object for plotting or further analysis ...


0

The existing answers are all expanding the pre-binned dataset into a full distribution and then using R's histogram function which is memory inefficient and will not scale for very large datasets like the original poster asked about. The HistogramTools CRAN package includes a PreBinnedHistogram function which takes arguments for breaks and counts to create ...


-1

you can use sample command: for 2d: set sample <value> for 3d: set isosample <value> value can be 10,20,30...


0

If your goal is to reproduce the output of hist(...) using ggplot, this will work: ggplot(bigx, aes(x=x)) + geom_histogram(fill = "red", colour = "black",stat="bin", binwidth=2, right=TRUE) + scale_x_continuous(limits=c(0,12),breaks=seq(0,12,2)) Or, more generally, this: brks <- hist(bigx$x, plot=F)$breaks ggplot(bigx, ...


2

Yes, use ImageMagick's identify command: identify -verbose image1.png Image: image1.png Format: PNG (Portable Network Graphics) Mime type: image/png Class: DirectClass Geometry: 150x150+0+0 Units: Undefined Type: PaletteAlpha Endianess: Undefined Colorspace: sRGB Depth: 8-bit Channel depth: red: 8-bit green: 8-bit blue: ...


0

A lot of NumPy functions do not work with arrays of dtype object. To use np.histogramdd, you'll need an array of shape (N, D), so structured arrays will not be helpful here either (since a structured array would remove the D dimension). You'll need an array of homogenous non-object dtype. Since the first two columns are floats, let's try to represent the ...


0

Add vmin and vmax parameters with equal absolute values plt.pcolormesh(xedges, yedges, Z, cmap=CM.RdBu_r, vmin=-7, vmax=7) and see if you like the result


0

Thanks to http://nbviewer.ipython.org/gist/pelson/5628989 import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from matplotlib.colors import from_levels_and_colors x = np.random.rand(400) y = np.random.rand(400) Z, xedges, yedges = np.histogram2d(x, y, bins=10) Z = Z - 2. # -1 0 3 6 9 cmap, norm = from_levels_and_colors([-1, 0, 3, 6, 9, 12], ['r', 'b', ...


3

For anyone coming across this question: Since pandas 0.14, plotting with bars has a 'width' command: https://github.com/pydata/pandas/pull/6644 The example above can now be solved simply by using df.plot(kind='bar', stacked=True, width=1)


1

You need to do the following to have what you want: a <- read.table(header=T , text="cars type company value car1 all company1 0.4 car2 all company1 0.6 car3 all company1 1 car1 one company1 1.2 car1 one company1 0.1 car2 one company1 0.1 car3 one company1 0.9 car1 one company1 0.44 car2 one company2 0.55 car3 one company2 0.1 car1 ...


0

As Roman said you can use the cut function, r<-cut(x,breaks=c(0,50,Inf),levels=c("lev1","lev2") will partition the x into two levels. Then you can draw the histogram using the usual hist command.


0

Yes, but this means you have to pre-calculate the values yourself. You can use function cut to define breaks in your data. The result will be a factor (with bin names as indicators where the split was done). You can then merge factor levels and plot the result.


1

The problem is that each bin start at different position depending of the data. You can solve this problem by setting where the bin start with the parameter range when you call the histogram. (Don't get confuse with the function range()) import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np #set value for testing actual_nn = np.random.randn(100) random_nn = ...


0

For me also, it was not clear in the paper how to calculate the bin similarity matrix. However, the code of the paper that describes it is available here: http://www.cs.huji.ac.il/~ofirpele/QC/ There is a function called: sift_bin_similarity_function.m. Therein the implementation of calculating the bin similarity.


0

You can also use the regular histogram function hist and then change the point of view by typing >> view(90, -90)


0

You have to use "date" filter to tell Logstash about the date format - it will then convert your timestamp from the file into the @timestamp field. Take a look here: http://logstash.net/docs/1.4.2/filters/date


0

Id like to have added this as comment, but I don't have the reputation... anyway, I'm guessing that Kibana thinks your datetime is a string, not a type date (check the mapping, http://localhost:9200/_mapping?pretty or whatever). I had a similar problem, but followed this: ...


0

This follows your idea of reducing the maximum value for each iteration. def h(x): mx =max(x) lx = len(x) m = [] for v in x : # reduces max value by 1 in each ieration # VVVVVV m.append([" "if v < mx-n else "***" for n in range(l)]) # ^^^^^^ return "\n".join([" ...


0

On request here is an answer that looks like the original solution - just modified to give correct results. def histogram(x): y=max(x) while x!=[0]*len(x): for i in range(len(x)): if x[i]==y: print("###"), x[i]-=1 elif x[i]<y: print(" "), print("") ...


3

Here is a different algorithm for your question: im = imread('lena.png'); % imshow(im); histogram(im) function histogram(im) [rowSize, colSize, rgb] = size(im); nshades = 256; hist = zeros(rgb, nshades); figure, RGB = ['r', 'g', 'b']; names = [{'Red Channel'}, {'Green Channel'}, {'Blue ...


0

From the suggestion of BrenBarn, I was able solve my problem. Here's my solution: bar = pd.DataFrame(maxdf['maxnet'].value_counts()) bar = bar.sort() bar.plot(kind='bar')


3

Try this: par(mfrow = c(2, 2)) tapply(iris$Sepal.Length, iris$Species, hist) however, for multi-panel plots you might find the lattice or ggplot2 plackages more suitable. library(lattice) histogram(~ Sepal.Length | Species, iris) library(ggplot2) ggplot(iris, aes(Sepal.Length)) + geom_histogram() + facet_wrap(~ Species)


3

Here is the code which draws histogram of each color channels of an image. I=imread('lena.png'); r=I(:,:,1); g=I(:,:,2); b=I(:,:,3); totalNumofPixel=size(I,1)*size(I,2); FrequencyofRedValues=zeros(256,1); FrequencyofGreenValues=zeros(256,1); FrequencyofBlueValues=zeros(256,1); for x=0:255 FrequencyofRedValues(x+1)=size(r(r==x),1); // number of ...


1

Building upon user1415946's comment, you can assume each point represents a bi-variate normal distribution with the covariance matrices given by [[e_x[i]**2,0][0,e_y[i]**2]]. However, the resulting distribution is not a normal distribution - you'll see, after running the example, how the histogram doesn't resemble a Gaussian at all, but instead a group of ...


1

I think I just cracked it ... Make a new function out of hist and after edges in the m file add this line: [~,my_labels] = histc(y,edges,1); and my_labels will contain your matrix with the histogram values instead of the actual values.


0

First of all, at least with plot(), there.s no reason to force a data.frame. plot() understands table objects. You can do plot(table(words$words)) # or plot(table(words$words), type="p") # or barplot(table(words$words)) We can use Filter to filter rows, unfortunately that drops the table class. But we can add that back on with as.table. This looks like ...


2

I generate some random data set.seed(1) df <- data.frame(Var1 = letters, Freq = sample(1: 8, 26, T)) Then I use dplyr::filter because it is very fast and easy. library(ggplot2); library(dplyr) qplot(data = filter(df, Freq > 2), Var1, Freq, geom= "bar", stat = "identity")



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