Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Kibana 4 introduced Scripted fields that can be used in Histograms and such enter link description here


0

If by 'frequency' you mean the rate, i.e. the number of times a value occurs per second, then you can add the weights keyword argument to you pyplot.hist() call, as documented here. You will need to give weights as an array with the same size as your data, so you can use weights = numpy.ones_like(x.shape) / duration where duration is the total amount of ...


1

One way I can think about to find peaks is to find the first derivative and then find the negative numbers of it. for example, a = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 6, 3, 4] in this example the peak is 6 in the position 6 and 4 in the las position. so, if you extend the vector (0 at the end) and apply the first derivative (a[i] - a[i-1]) you'll get a_deriv = ...


0

So what is your actual problem with this? Using the histograms plotting should work fine. Consider the following data file A -1 1 -0.5 0.5 B -2 2 -1 1 C -3 3 -1.5 1.5 D -4 4 -2 2 E -5 5 -2.5 2.5 F -4 4 -2 2 G -3 3 -1.5 1.5 which you can plot with set key tmargin horizontal set style fill solid noborder set style data histograms set style histogram ...


1

http://trompelecode.com/blog/2012/04/how-to-create-an-image-histogram-using-csharp-and-wpf/ I think that should be what you are looking for


0

After a long night, I got the answer since every event was ocurring only once I added an extra column in the file with the number one and then indexed the dataframe by this: df = pd.read_excel("somefile.xls",index_col='Numberone') And then simply tried this: df.hist(by=df['Offense Type']) finally getting exactly what I wanted


0

hist can return two outputs. You need them both here. A = hist(X,n); plot(A); This will plot A against the x-axis of 1:n (the length of A). So if you used 100 bins to create the plot, the plot equivalent will be plot(1:100,A). Changing xlim doesn't affect that - only the part of the plot that you're viewing. The second output of hist returns the bin ...


0

This is within imhist()'s capability, I think.


0

Alternatively you could try a k-means approach. Calculate k clusters with k ~ 2..5 and take the centroid of the biggest group as your dominant color. The python docu of OpenCv has an illustrated example that gets the dominant color(s) pretty well:


2

You could use the scikit-image library to perform Global and Local Histogram Equalization. Stealing with pride from the link, below is the snippet. The equalization is done with a disk shaped kernel (or footprint), but you could change this to a square, by setting kernel = np.ones((N,M)). import numpy as np import matplotlib import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ...


0

Here are some suggestions to get you started. All 3 channels in RGB contribute to the color, so you'd have to somehow figure out where three different histograms are all at maximum. (Or their sum is maximum, or whatever.) HSV has all of the color (well, Hue) information in one channel, so you only have to consider one histogram. Grayscale throws away all ...


0

That error is because you are trying to assign a key to a list, and list only can be indexed by intenger list[0], list[1], so on. So, hinstogram must be a dict not a list Make sure when you call add_to_hist method, pass a dict. You can init a dict in that way: histogram = {} UPDATED Based on your comment, you can't pass ...


0

Using a kde did give me the plot I wanted, but in fact I would suggest using seaborn for this, as the module has a command distplot which plots a histogram and density plot at the same time. Examples of using seaborn given here: http://nbviewer.ipython.org/github/mwaskom/seaborn/blob/master/examples/plotting_distributions.ipynb


0

A popular way is to use kernel density estimation. The simplest way to do this in Matlab is using ksdensity.


0

The function hist gives you an approximation of the probability density you are evaluating. If you want a continuous representation of it, this article from the Matlab documentation explains how to get one using the spline command from the Curve Fitting Toolbox. Basically the article explains how to make a cubic interpolation of your histogram. The ...


0

Iv got it all working. Thank you @CandiedOrange and @MadProgrammer for the help and guidance! Found that my histogram code was messed up with my for statements having a ; in an incorrect spot causing my for statement to not apply the * based on its process of running through the for statement and it was just printing a * as a normal print function. All is ...


1

Use fillstyle pattern to select between different fill patterns for each bar type, and lt -1 (or lc rgb 'black') to use black as line color: set terminal pngcairo set output "diskimage.png" set style data histograms plot 'Disk.txt' using 2:xtic(1) fs pattern 2 lt -1 title "Oct-09 data growth(gb)",\ '' using 3 fs pattern 1 lt -1 title "Nov-09 data ...


3

"I do not understand what in the world this histogram is displaying." Well, as you said: "Histogram showing total number of dice rolls for each possible value" The histogram: 2: ****** 3: **** 4: *** 5: ******** 6: ******************* 7: ************* 8: ************* 9: ************** 10: *********** 11: ***** 12: **** is a ...


1

Forget about defining all those styles by hand and work within a loop instead: unset title set key left set yrange [0:10] set ylabel 'Score' set xtics rotate out set style histogram gap 1 set style data histogram set style fill solid 1.00 border 0 set xtics nomirror set ytics nomirror plot for [i=1:3] 'example.dat' \ every ::((i-1)*3)::((i-1)*3+2) using ...


0

Here is a sketch (pseudocode, not real code) of the EM algorithm. You don't need the histogram at all. function M_step (x, responsibility, j) bump_mean[j] = sum (x[j]*responsibility[i, j], j, 1, n) where n = length(x) bump_mean_x2[j] = sum (x[j]**2 * responsibility[i, j], j, 1, n) bump_variance[j] = bump_mean_x2[j] - bump_mean[j]**2 ...


1

This code above DOES give you a 3D histogram. I don't quite understand why you think it does not. Why is it three-dimensional? Because argument int dim in method calcHist() has value 3. If you want 2D histogram then it would be 2. You want to print values of 3D histogram with cout << hist.at<int>(x, y, z) << endl; where x, y and z are ...


0

Few mistakes. 1.) int wordLength = word.length; to int wordLength = word.length(); 2.) String newWord = infile.next(); to String newWord = infile.readLine(); 3.) Add Try Catch code as below public class Project5 { static final int INITIAL_CAPACITY = 10; public static void main(String[] args) { if (args.length < 1) ...


1

data <- structure(c(-0.447315711911355, 0.670646511357067, 0.28805337765816, 0.210323243582978, 0.558951367403988, 0.607248748494035, -1.16412611819213, 0.0915424491269807, 0.469191549286902, -0.619038988584179, -0.659390830669932, -0.924810741449363, -1.42269762267215, -0.13593956988495, -1.92882493234572, -1.27638233136087, 1.3816213467106, ...


0

Your question is awkward, but here is a start on the answer. Edit your question to incorporate reproducible data, extend this answer, and see what else you need. data <- matrix(rnorm(50, 0, 1), ncol=5) colnames(data) <- c("Return1", "Return2", "Return3", "Return4", "Return5") rownames(data) <- c("1995", "1996", "1997", "1998", "1999", "2000", ...


0

To use facet_grid, you need to create a column (named returns for example) in data that contains : Return1, Return2, ... And then : h + facet_grid(.~returns) But I think that the variable you use in facet_grid must be different from x in aes()


1

you are plotting pairs of random numbers with it's corresponding density... if you simply want to overlay the line, don't use runif(), but seq(): x <- seq(from=0, to=1, length.out=10000) lines(x, dbeta(x, 6,3))


1

Here is a solution using ggplot2 x = runif(100000,0,1) x = data.frame(beta=dbeta(x,6,3)) library(ggplot2) ggplot(x, aes(beta)) + geom_histogram(aes(y=..density..), binwidth=.1, colour="red", fill="white") + geom_density(alpha=.2)


1

am = hist(dat, col="lightgreen", labels = TRUE, breaks=seq(min(dat)-2,max(dat)), axes=F) axis(2) axis(1,at=am$mids,seq(min(dat)-1,max(dat)))


1

Did you mean like this: hist(dat, col="lightgreen", labels = TRUE, xlim=c(0,10), ylim=c(0,27), breaks = 0:10, at=0:10)


0

You might want to check out ImagePlot. I'm not sure if the algorithms behind the system are available, but you can certainly download and run your image collection through the free software to analyze them. This software is used in many interesting visualizations of massive image collections, millions+ Info: ...


1

import pandas as pd pd.Series(list(L)).value_counts()


4

One possibility would be to use a 'hollow histogram', as described here: # assign your original plot object to a variable p1 <- ggplot(data = dat, aes(x = values, linetype = category, fill = category)) + geom_histogram(colour = 'black', position = 'identity', alpha = 0.4, binwidth = 0.4) + scale_fill_grey() # p1 # extract relevant variables from ...


1

First, I would recommend theme_set(theme_bw()) or theme_set(theme_classic()) (this sets the background to white, which makes it (much) easier to see shades of gray). Second, you could try something like scale_linetype_manual(values=c(1,3)) -- this won't completely eliminate the artifacts you're unhappy about, but it might make them a little less prominent ...


0

Don't forget to consider float. So a slight modification to dabonz413's answer: maxVal = image.maximumValue() # 153 minVal = image.minumumValue() # 84 dynamic = maxVal-minVal for pixel in image.Pixels(): newPixel = ((float) (pixel-minVal)/dynamic)*255


2

I don't know what you have for data, but here's an mock example of how to make a histogram with months\days on x axis. I can only assume that you start with a list of datetime objects, but I can't figure out what nc is (is that matplotlib.date module?) or what kind of times can exactly be found in the unique times. So generally this is the approach. These ...


0

There are several javascript libraries that can visaulize histograms. You can choose from them depending on your experience in javascript. If it is just a simple interactive histogram chart, I recommend going with c3.js, because it does the job for the least effort. See an example of interactive histogram chart here.


4

You're so close! In your code above, ggplot is interpreting your fill as variables in your data set - factor darkgreen and factor firebrick - and doesn't have any way of knowing that those labels are colors, not, say, names of animal species. If you add scale_fill_identity() to the end of your plot, as below, it will interpret those strings as colors (the ...


3

I don't think you can explicitly set colors in aes; you need to do it in scale_fill_manual, as in the example below: ggplot(dist.x, aes(x = sim_con)) + geom_histogram(colour = "black", binwidth = .01,aes(fill=(sim_con==1.55))) + scale_fill_manual(values=c('TRUE'='darkgreen','FALSE'='firebrick')) + theme(legend.position="none")


1

std::vector<int> computeColumnHistogram(const cv::Mat& in) { std::vector<int> histogram(in.cols,0); //Create a zeroed histogram of the necessary size for (int y = 0; y < in.rows; y++) { p_row = in.ptr(y); ///Get a pointer to the y-th row of the image for (int x = 0; x < in.cols; x++) histogram[x] += p_row[x]; ...


2

You probably want to use tryCatch for this. Something like the following should do the trick (though I can't test it since you don't provide any data). for(i in 1:ncol(d)) { tryCatch(hist(d[[i]], main=i), error=function(e) { tryCatch(barplot(d[[i]], main=i), error=function(e) { print('Error') }) }) }


0

haha, the problem is that matplotlib is reusing colors. So the plot is working as you want, you just need more colors. here is my modification to your code. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from numpy import array bins_1=[25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 100, 105, 110, 115, 120, 125, 130, 135, 140, 145, 150, ...


1

From your comment, I'm guessing your data table is actually much longer, and you want to see the distribution of name server counts (whatever count is here). I think you should just be able to do this: df.hist(column="count") And you'll get what you want. IF that is what you want. pandas has decent documentation for all of it's functions though, and ...


2

You can modify the data fed into histogram using script. Here using the script , i am subtracting 2 from all the numbers used to created the buckets. { "aggs" : { "histoWithOffset" : { "histogram" : { "field" : "numberField", "script" : "_value - 2" } } ...


1

Adding such a parameter to density would be statistically unwise for the reasons articulated by @MrFlick. If you want to convert a density estimate to be on the same scale as the observations, you can multiply by the length of the vector used for the density calculation. The density then becomes a "per x unit" estimate of "frequency". Compare the two plots: ...


1

You can either fit the data that you get from a histogram using one of several ways: Use numpy.polufit for polynomial fits Use scipy.optimize.curve_fit for fitting arbitrary functions There is also kernel density approximation: scipy.stats.gaussian_kde which is a standard representation for most statsiticians. In seaborn, you can plot sns.kdeplot for ...


0

Moose's comment which points to this blog entry does the job quite nicely. For completeness I give an axample here using nicer variable names and a looped execution on 1000 96x96 images which are in a 4D array as in the question. It is fast (1-2 seconds on my computer) and only needs NumPy. import numpy as np def image_histogram_equalization(image, ...


3

Using the Chart2D library, the example below illustrates some alternative approaches. A ColorConvertOp is used to convert the sample image to grayscale, as shown here and here. Nested loops iterate over the pixels of the BufferedImage, invoking the getRGB() method to extract the value of each pixel; the corresponding counts are used to construct the ...


6

The example below uses several techniques to create an RGB histogram of an arbitrary image: The Raster method getSamples() extracts the values of each color band from the BufferedImage. The HistogramDataset method addSeries() adds each band's counts to the dataset. A StandardXYBarPainter replaces the ChartFactory default, as shown here. A custom ...


0

I have tried do it with example code found somewhere on the internet. It's for RGB but anyway, it looks like this: import java.awt.Color; import java.awt.Font; import java.awt.Graphics; import java.awt.Graphics2D; import java.awt.image.BufferedImage; import javax.swing.JFrame; public class HistogramRGB extends JFrame { public HistogramRGB (BufferedImage ...


0

From the code in your question, it looks like you're using numpy. There are better ways to approach this problem in numpy, and I'll go over those at the end of the answer. For the moment, though, let's look at why what you tried didn't work. The reason that it's not working is that your V array is the bin edges. It's not the same size as your X or Y ...



Top 50 recent answers are included