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3

Calling hist silently returns information you can use to modify the plot. You can pull out the midpoints and the heights and use that information to put the labels where you want them. You can use the pos argument in text to specify where the label should be in relation to the point (thanks @rawr) x <- sample(1:10,1000,replace=T) ## Histogram info ...


0

If you're using the lower-level libraries (that is, not pandas's wrappers for them), you probably should use hist(antimony.Antimony.values) (see thehist documentation for more).


2

Use scale_x_continuous: +scale_x_continuous(breaks=seq(-5,5,by=0.5))


0

Simply read up on the official documentation: set_dashes is a function that takes a sequence of on and off lengths in points. So set_dashes((3,3)) should produce something different then set_dashes((15,15)). Now, for hist that won't really work, since setting the line properties, at best, will change the appearance of the outline. What you can do ...


0

I'm not sure if I understand your question, but I'll give it a shot: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt X = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15] Y = [0.5717, 0.699, 0.7243, 0.5939, 0.5383, 0.5093, 0.7001, 0.589, 0.6486, 0.7152, 0.6805, 0.5688, 0.6133, 0.6041, 0.5676] plt.bar(X, Y, color='green', alpha=0.6, align='center') plt.xlabel('X') ...


1

library(ggplot2) prime <- c(2,3,5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29,31,37,41,43,47,53,59,61,67,71,73,79,83,89,97) data <- as.data.frame(prime) main <-"Frequency of Prime Numbers" ggplot(data, aes(x=prime)) + geom_histogram(binwidth = 1) + ggtitle(main)


0

hist takes a 1-dimensional array. Does this work? antimony.Antimony.hist()


0

Ok I think I get it what you want. It just a matter of reshaping data with reshape s 'cast function. The value.var argument is just to avoid the warning message that R tried to guess the value to use. The result does not change if you omit it. library(reshape2) as.matrix(dcast(dat, age1 ~ age2, value.var = "probdens")[-1]) 1 2 3 [1,] 0 2 4 [2,] 2 8 ...


0

np.array(list_for_hist) converts all items in list_for_hist to a common dtype. When list_for_hist contains both floats and strings, np.array returns an array containing all strings: In [32]: np.array(list_for_hist) Out[32]: array(['8.0', '19.0', '4.0', '4.0', '8.0', '3.0', '13.0', '', '10.0', '7.0', '17.0', '16.0', '8.0', '6.0', '13.0', '8.0', ...


0

From the pandas website (http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/visualization.html#visualization-hist): df4 = pd.DataFrame({'a': np.random.randn(1000) + 1, 'b': np.random.randn(1000), 'c': np.random.randn(1000) - 1}, columns=['a', 'b', 'c']) plt.figure(); df4.plot(kind='hist', alpha=0.5)


0

The bins are equally spaced already. To get probabilities out of an histogram you have to normalize (i.e. divide by the sum over all histogram values): probs = probs / np.sum(probs)


0

Realizing that the question is fairly old, I decided to answer it anyway since I ran into exactly the same problem. I see that some answers above misunderstood your original question. I think it is a valid visualization question and I outline below my solution that will hopefully be useful for others as well. My approach was to use ggplot and create ...


1

That's is because you have inf values in your array. You can fix this if you prevent 0 division: my_array = [i/m for i,m in zip(a, b) if m!=0] or with: my_array = my_array[~np.isinf(my_array)]


-1

Well I don't sure that you want to plot, but saw that you were zipping two list with two columns, then you can plot this with hist() There are another error in your code I change the line 10, goog['Ret']=((goog['Close'].shift(1))) and the line 40 by plt.hist(a, bins=25) plt.hist(b, bins=25) The problem with this line 40 is parameter my_array. a and b ...


7

In terms of calculating the histogram, the computation of the frequency per intensity is correct though there is a slight error... more on that later. Also, I would personally avoid using loops here. See my small note at the end of this post. Nevertheless, there are three problems with your code: Problem #1 - Histogram is not initialized properly ...


3

Your code looks correct. The problem is with the call to histogram. You need to supply the number of bins in the call to histogram, otherwise they will be computed automatically. Try this simple modification which calls stem to get the right plot, instead of relying on histogram function h = histogram_matlab(imageSource) openImage = ...


0

The common point here is probability density map. Compute probability density maps for each of your methods, then sum ( or multipy) values, normalize, and you'll have combined probability density map for your object.


0

I found a solution for my problem, not by using an histogram equalization, but by using a linear stretching, here is an example for the GLSL code: varying vec4 oe_layer_texc; uniform sampler2D oe_layer_tex; float NMIN = 0.0; float NMAX = 65535.0; float OMIN = 238.0; float OMAX = 557.0; float space = ( NMAX - NMIN ) / ( OMAX - OMIN ) ; float bins = ( ...


1

I think this- while (filescan.hasNext()) { int num = filescan.nextInt(); for(int i = 0; i < 101; i++) list[i] = num; } should be this- int i = 0, num; while (filescan.hasNext()) { num = filescan.nextInt(); list[i] = num; if(i == 100) break; i++; }


1

The breaks are always one longer than the counts. Because the counts fall between each pair of breaks. Maybe you want to track the midpoints of the regions instead? with(hist(x), data.frame(breaks = mids, counts = counts)) otherwise you could just assign the count for the value at the right edge of the region with(hist(x), data.frame(breaks = breaks[-1], ...


1

You can bin the groups by the histogram breaks and make a barplot. bs <- hist(dist, breaks=seq(0, 56, by=7)-0.5, plot=F)$breaks probs <- table(cut(dist, bs)) / length(dist) barplot(probs, ylab="Probability", las=2)


1

Here's a wrapper i've used in the past to coerce the values to probabilites. probabilityplot<-function(x, ..., prob=T, ylab="Probability") { xx<-hist(x, yaxt="n", prob=prob, ylab=ylab , ...) bin.sizes<-diff(xx$breaks) if (any(bin.sizes != bin.sizes[1])) stop("bin sizes are not the same") marks<-axTicks(2) axis(2, at=marks, ...


0

This appears to work pretty well, although I would be happier with it if it didn't go through the Matplotlib date specifics regarding ordinal dates. times = race1.index.to_series() today = pandas.Timestamp('00:00:00') timedelta = times - today times_ordinal = timedelta.dt.seconds/(24*60*60) + today.toordinal() ax = times_ordinal.hist() ax.xaxis_date() ...


1

Thanks to tegancp for advise. Here is my solution: x <- c(rnorm(n=1000, mean=5, sd=1), rnorm(n=1000, mean=7, sd=1)) y <- c(rnorm(n=1000, mean=5, sd=1), rnorm(n=1000, mean=7, sd=1)) d <- data.frame(x,y) d$type=c(rep("Rd",1000),rep("Wr",1000)) p <- ggplot(d) + geom_bin2d(aes(x=x, y=y, alpha=..count.., fill = d$type)) pdf(file="my_file.pdf") ...


0

The function hist() will normalise for you with its 3rd parameter: x = rand(1000, 1)*360-180; [probas, angles] = hist(x, -180:10:180, 1.0); bar(angles, probas); You might want to combine values of bin -180 and +180 Now angles and probas are available for other plots.


0

The parameter rwidth specifies the width of your bar relative to the width of your bin. So if your bin width is say 1 and rwidth=0.5, the bar width will be 0.5. On both side of the bar you will have a space of 0.25. Mind: this gives a space of 0.5 between consecutive bars. Indeed, with the number of bins you have, you won't see these spaces. But with (much) ...


1

So essentially you want to scale the histogram of your image to range from 0 - 255. All you need is the max and the min. The easiest way to find them is a = min(I(:)); b = max(I(:)); Also I suspect you middle equation should actually be f(x,y)=(255/(a-b))*(f(x,y)-a) for [a,b] however that would eliminate the need for your first two equations. So ...


0

You can iterate over the four blocks with do for, call stats using the same using and every settings as you already have in your plot command. Then, in each iteration, and set the appropriate label using the many values that stats gives you: STATS_mean_x as x-coordinate of the label STATS_max_y as y-coordinate (plus an offset of 1 character height, done ...


6

This goes against my policy in answering questions without any effort made by the question poser, but this seems like an interesting question, so I'll make an exception. First, split up each of the Time and Trial fields so that they're in separate arrays. For the Trial fields, I'm going to convert them into labels 1 and 2 to denote correct and incorrect ...


1

Using IRanges, you should use findOverlaps or mergeByOverlaps instead of countOverlaps. It, by default, doesn't return no matches though. I'll leave that to you. Instead, will show an alternate method using foverlaps() from data.table package: require(data.table) subject <- data.table(interval = paste("int", 1:4, sep=""), start = ...


1

To restrict focus to just the middle 99% of the values, you could do something like this: trimmed_data = df[(df.Column > df.Columnquantile(0.005)) & (df.Column < df.Column.quantile(0.995))] Then you could do your histogram on trimmed_data. Exactly how to exclude outliers is more of a stats question than a Python question, but basically the idea ...


1

It's not really histogramming what your are after. A histogram is more a count of items that fall into a specific bin. What you want to do is more a group by operation, where you'd group your intensities by radius intervals and on the groups of itensities you apply some aggregation method, like average or median etc. What your are describing, however, ...


1

The following saves each file with the name image1, image2,... as a pdf file in your working directory. You can also change pdf to jpeg or png or ps. lapply(1:2,function(i){ pdf(paste0("image",i,".pdf")) hist(mtcars[,i]) dev.off()})


1

if you only need to do this for a handful of points, you could do something like this. If intensites and radius are numpy arrays of your data: bin_width = 0.1 # Depending on how narrow you want your bins def get_avg(rad): average_intensity = intensities[(radius>=rad-bin_width/2.) & (radius<rad+bin_width/2.)].mean() return ...


1

You can write a function that returns one horizontal line of the histogram at a given height, outputting a * for each column if it is at or equal that height and a space otherwise: def get_histogram_line(height, max_length): s = ""; for i in range(0, max_length + 1): if word_length_count[i] >= height: s += "***" else: ...


0

This can be fixed by doing: ggplot(df,aes(x= len, ymax=max(..count..))) + stat_bin(geom="bar", binwidth=5, aes(fill=..count..), colour="black") So by putting the ymax parameter in the aes and setting it to ..count.. in the situation where you are using stat_bin.


3

Like Jester I'm surprised that your SIMD code had any significant improvement. Did you compile the C code with optimization turned on? The one additional suggestion I can make is to unroll your Packetloop loop. This is a fairly simple optimization and reduces the number of instructions per "iteration" to just two: pextrb ebx, xmm0, 0 inc dword [ebx * 4 + ...


2

Question 1 What do $mids and $equidist mean: From the help file: mids: the n cell midpoints. equidist: logical, indicating if the distances between breaks are all the same. Q2: Yes, with h1=hist(c(1,1,2,3,4,5,5,1.5), breaks=0.5:5.5) 1.5 will fall into the 0.5-1.5 categorie. If you want it to fall into the 1.5-2.5 categorie, you should ...


0

If you're looking to set ticks on the y-axis every n values, you can use: pylab.yticks(range(min, max, n)) I am using Python 2.7.


1

In order to center the bars you can do _ = df.hist(figsize=(12, 10), bins=bins, align='left')


1

Assuming uint8 precision, each call to imhist will give you a 256 x 1 vector, and so you can concatenate these together into a single 768 x 1 vector. After, call bar with the histc flag. Assuming you have your image stored in im, do this: red = imhist(im(:,:,1)); green = imhist(im(:,:,2)); blue = imhist(im(:,:,3)); h = [red; green; blue]; bar(h, 'histc'); ...


1

Matlab has a function for histogram matching and their site has some great examples too Just use any frame as the reference (I suggest using the first one, but there is no real reason to do so), and keep it for all the remaining frames. If you want to decrease processing time you can also try lowering the number of bins. For a uint8 image there are usually ...


0

Did you try to add CustomLabels to replace the default ones? For example: for (int i = 0; i <= 10; i++) { area.AxisX.CustomLabels.Add(i + 0.5, i + 1.5, i, 0, LabelMarkStyle.None); } The first two are for positioning and the third would be the text value of the label.


4

Your code is obfuscating to me what your final result is supposed to be exactly. Maybe this: library(ggplot2) DF <- merge(xy.pop, xx.pop, by = "Var1") ggplot(DF, aes(y = Var1, xmin = -Freq.x, xmax = Freq.y, x = 0)) + geom_errorbarh() + geom_vline(xintercept = 0, size = 1.5) + theme_minimal() + xlab("") + ylab("") + theme(panel.grid = ...


2

As far as I know, matplotlib does not have this function built-in. However, it is easy enough to replicate import numpy as np heights,bins = np.histogram(data,bins=50) heights = heights/sum(heights) plt.bar(bins[:-1],heights,width=(max(bins) - min(bins))/len(bins), color="blue", alpha=0.5) Edit: Here is another approach from a similar ...


1

You can binary search for binEdges using TreeMap: public static double[] binCounts(double[] x, double[] binEdges) { int binEdgesSize = binEdges.length; NavigableMap<Double, Integer> binEdgesMap = new TreeMap<>(); for (int i = 0; i < binEdgesSize; ++i) binEdgesMap.put(binEdges[i], i); double [] ret = new ...


0

If you take a look at your data, you can try to recognize if they have any patterns, you can figure out any best case sorting algorithm can fits in, or get some insight on how image compress. When considering video game objects, the coordination update on every frame update may be a little adjustment only, thus we can simply apply bubble sort and mostly it ...


1

You must give an explicit string as label: plot newhistogram 'foo', 'file.dat' u 2:xtic(1) t col, '' u 3 t col, \ '' u ($0-1):($2+$3):(sprintf('%.1f', $2+$3)) notitle w labels offset 0,1 font "Arial,8" As other improvement, I would use the offset option which allows you to give an displacement in character units, which doesn't depend on the yrange. ...


1

with your data, cases = list(set(actions)) fig, ax = plt.subplots() ax.hist(map(lambda x: times[actions==x], cases), bins=np.arange(min(times), max(times) + binwidth, binwidth), histtype='bar', stacked=True, label=cases) ax.legend() plt.show() produces


0

i came to this page from http://www.r-bloggers.com/5-ways-to-do-2d-histograms-in-r/ which lists one of the answers above. It provides code samples for a total of 5 methods: hist2d from the library gplots hexbin,hexbinplot from the library hexbin stat_bin2d from the library ggplot2 kde2d from the library MASS the "hard way" solution listed above.



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