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0

Your question is unclear. This? a = [0,1,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,6,6,6,7,7,7,7,7,8,9,9,10] tab1 = proc { Hash[a.group_by{ |v| v }.map{ |k, v| [k, v.size] }] } t1 = Thread.new(&tab1) t2 = Thread.new(&tab1) p t1.value p t2.value


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Histograms do not usually show you probabilities, they show the count or frequency of observations within different intervals of values, called bins. pyplot defines interval or bins by splitting the range between the minimum and maximum value of your array into n equally sized bins, where n is the number you specified with argument : bins = 1. So, in this ...


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update for numpy version 1.9.0. user545424's answer does not work in 1.9.0. This works: >>> import numpy as np >>> arr = np.random.randint(0,10,100) >>> hist, bin_edges = np.histogram(arr, density=True) >>> hist = array([ 0.16666667, 0.15555556, 0.15555556, 0.05555556, 0.08888889, 0.08888889, 0.07777778, ...


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I figured out that to display a vertical histogram (downward) without using arrays, you can do it through using 16 if statements as follows (16 if statements because of the 16 possible outcomes with 4 variables): System.out.println("0-29 30-39 40-69 70-100"); for(int v = 0; ...


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Removing cells with NaN would destroy the matrix structure. Removing whole rows that contain NaN would discard real data. Instead, the Statistics Toolbox has a variety of functions that are similar to other MATLAB functions, but that treat NaN values as missing and therefore ignore them in the calculations.


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[edit2] color reduction that is easy it is just recoloring by the table uniform[256] has nothing to do with uniform histograms !!! create translation(recoloring) table for each possible color for 8-bit gray-scale it is 256 colors for example BYTE table[256] = { 0,1,2,3,4,58,5,6,7,58,58,58,8,58,9,10,11,58,58,58,58,58,58,58,12,58,58,58,13,58, ...


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Figure out the height of the histogram by finding the maximum value max = countertwo; if(counterthree>max) max = counterthree; if(counterfour>max) max = counterfour; ect alternatively max=Math.max(countetOne, Math.max(countertwo, Math.max(counterthree, Math.max.. ect Display the histogram like this for(int i = max; i > 0; i--) //for each row ...


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Naive answer for making a histogram of X, the DFT of a time domain signal x import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np ... w = np.linspace(0,N*dw-dw,N) plt.bar(w, abs(X), align='center', width=dw) plt.show() For a nice looking plot, you have to take into account that X is associated with frequencies 0*dw, 1*dw, ..., (N-1)*dw and that, in a ...


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You probably have some irrational number in your y array like nan or inf. You didn't post all of the values, so you have to check yourself. you can also do this by: pylab.isnan(y).any() and pylab.isinf(y).any() Good luck


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If I understand you right, you have pre-binned data: interval count [ 0, 10) 1 [ 10, 30) 15 [ 30, 200) 44 [200, 400) 40 total 100 Your code does not work, because hist tries to the bin the values in x by itself. 1 goes to the first interval, 15 to the second and 44 and 40 to the third one. I don't know how to do ...


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I assume you use the mean of the three components instead of the function rgb2gray because it has some advantages in your case. (rgb2gray does something similar: it uses a weighted sum). Subtracting the minimum and dividing by the maximum doesn't convert your image to binary. It will only scale all values to the range (0,1), which is the case in your ...


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In future you should include your data, or at least a representative example. See this post for instructions on how to do that. # sample data... set.seed(1) # for reproducible example df <- data.frame(x=rnorm(1000,mean=rep(c(0,3,6,9),each=250)), y=rep(c("Staff","Mgt"),each=500), z=rep(c("High","Low"),each=250)) # ...


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Your spacing in the drawVert() method is off. Some is just simple yet easily fixed, but there is some sloppy coding on your part. While decreasing the time complexity is good, there must be correct code. By spacing your numbers out, you can allow for a prettier x-axis, and by revisiting your stars, you'd see that you didn't have equivalent spacing when there ...


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I'd be inclined to do this with facets. Otherwise, with your dataset, the result are incomprehensible. library(reshape2) library(ggplot2) gg <- melt(wt) ggplot(gg, aes(x=value, fill=variable)) + geom_histogram(binwidth=10)+ facet_grid(variable~.) EDIT: Response to OP's comment. melt(...) converts a data frame from "wide" format - data in ...


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I'd be inclined to use ggplot for something like this. Here are some approaches using made up data (in future, you should provide your data, or at least a representative sample). set.seed(1) # for reproducible example reports <- data.frame(garbage=rchisq(900,c(10,15,20))/50,cluster=LETTERS[1:3]) This is seems like what you were looking for - a ...


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In your code see breaks=boundaries the parameter breaks controls the breaks of histogram. In your case it is too small.


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You can pass the argument col with the colors you want, I am not sure if by passing a list of colors like col = c("green", "red", "blue") will do what you want, but you can certainly select which color do they have


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Here is what I would do if you just need something working without worrying much about the approach, get size of the image first in width and height. Now you know where is the center, let's say (x, y)th pixel it is. Define a threshold(t) and a weight(w) for the pixels you want the special treatment on. Very poor complexity here but depending on the size ...


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This hist function does two things. It calculate the histogram data and also plots the data. When you assign the return value, ie fit<-hist(), you are only capturing the histogram data and not the plot settings. Any custom properties that you passed along for plotting are not preserved in that object. If you just wanted to set the variable name, you ...


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df<-data.frame(time=c(1,2,3),Calls=c(18,16,15)) plot(df$time,df$Calls,type='l') Take a look at ?plot for more details about R's basic plotting methods.


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usually I use ggplot package. But I never tried to do this. However, try this code: { ##Create your model e.g. model <- lm(Y ~ X , your_data) ## Create a data frame with X column, interpolating across range xmin <- min(your_data$X) xmax <- max(your_data$X) predict <- data.frame(X=seq(xmin, xmax, length.out=100)) ## Calculate predicted values ...


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Here is an example of what I think you want using the ggplot2 package. The grammer makes this chart somewhat easy to construct (it takes much more code to replicate your data!) Lines <- read.table(textConnection("Begin End EventID 01.01.2000 01.05.2000 1 03.04.1998 03.09.1999 1 12.03.2014 16.07.2014 2 12.12.2003 03.06.2004 3 21.06.1993 14.12.1993 2 ...


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What was your error message? You should have told us. I get: Error in curve(dnorm(control, mean = mean(control), sd = sd(control)), : 'expr' must be a function, or a call or an expression containing 'x' So make it an expression containing x: curve(dnorm(x,mean=mean(control),sd=sd(control)), add=TRUE,col="red")


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first of all you should probably use the .dropna() function to get rid of non-sensible values. Next I think the groupby() function is your friend if you look for 'uniqueness'. import pandas as pd import matplotlib.pyplot as plt frame = pd.DataFrame([['euler', 1, 3], ['gauss', 1, 5], ['fibo', 1, 6], ['schwartz', 2, 3], ['helmholtz', 2, 4], ['mandelbrodt', ...


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If I understood correctly, both hists should go into the same subplot. So it should be fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) _ = ax.hist(x.values) _ = ax.hist(y.values, color='red', alpha=.3) You can also pass the pandas plot method an axis object, so if you want both kde's in another plot do: fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) ...


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You can use plt.figure() and the function add_subplot(): the first 2 arguments are the number of rows and cols you want in your plot, the last is the position of the subplot in the plot. fig = plt.figure() subplot = fig.add_subplot(1, 2, 1) subplot.hist(x.ix[:,0], alpha=0.5) subplot = fig.add_subplot(1, 2, 2) subplot.hist(y.ix[:,0], alpha=0.5)


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I found and even better solution (for my purposes) than posted above by applying the following code ggplot(WDI_GDP_annual, aes(x = time, y = gdp_annual, fill = time)) + geom_bar(stat="identity") + xlab("Years") + ylab("GDP growth (annual %)") + ggtitle("GDP growth (annual %) / Year for Brazil") + theme(text = element_text(family="Palatino", size=11), ...


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Maybe the problem is here -->using($0):xtic("sdaf") title "Legend 1", set it to $1 instead of $0


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I would do that task like this: $estatisticas = array_count_values($histogram); for($i=0;$i<100;$i++) { if(!isset($estatisticas[$i])) { $estatisticas[$i] = 0; } }


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Your $estatisticas is not instanciated properly, i have made a little modification to your code, hope that helps <?php //vars $histogram = array(); $estatisticas = array(); $num = 0; $count = 0; //connection do database include('connect_db.php'); etc... everything fine here //insert into array $histogram() values from database... everything fine ...


0

If you want the average histogram, you could also directly calculate it on the gray image, like so: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4906403/586754 Perhaps in your sample (cBlue + cGreen + cRed) / 3.0 The range is cropped since it calculates in bytes? But also, you should say how it is not adequate to better understand the problem.


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You need to supply a format specifying how R should label the time axis. Here is an example set.seed(21) gran <- list(Date = sample(seq(Sys.Date(), by = "months", length.out = 30), 1368, replace = TRUE)) with(gran, hist(Date, breaks = "months", format = "%b %Y", las = 2)) Compare this with the default chosen by the ...


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You can use facet_wrap to achieve what you have described: yellowmellow <- structure(list(X = structure(c(1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L), .Label = c("Forest_CE", "Forest_OE"), class = "factor"), Product = structure(c(5L, 5L, 6L, 6L, 3L, 3L, 4L, 4L, 1L, ...


1

The following code should work for you. There are two issues: The edges of your bins are passed to the bins argument, not to the range argument. Besides, passing a list of tuples does not seem to work. If you convert those tuples to a numpy array and pass the array it should work as expected. This code works for me: import numpy as np def rand_data(N): ...


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The way I'd do this is to reformat the data in columns like this: x-axis group11 group22 group33 1 0.1123 0.1687 0.1312 2 0.4567 0.4578 0.7465 3 0.7532 0.7742 0.7123 Then it's the usual gnuplot histogram. set style fill solid 1.00 border -1 set style data histogram set style histogram cluster gap 2 plot 'data2.dat' using 2 t "11", '' using 3 t "22", '' ...


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i find correct code for this and write here for others clc A=input('please enter image adress: ','s'); GIm=imread(A); [x, y ,m]=size(GIm); if m==3 GIm=rgb2gray(GIm); end inf=whos('GIm'); Isize=0; if inf.class=='uint8' Isize=256; else if inf.class=='uint68' Isize=65565; end end HIm=uint8(zeros(size(GIm,1),size(GIm,2))); ...


0

Already beautiful answers are there, but I thought of adding this. Looks good to me. (Copied random numbers from @Dirk). library(scales) is needed` set.seed(42) hist(rnorm(500,4),xlim=c(0,10),col='skyblue',border=F) hist(rnorm(500,6),add=T,col=scales::alpha('red',.5),border=F) The result is...


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The error message hints at a continuous group variable. Discretizing it solves the issue: ggplot(result, aes(x=diff, fill=factor(year))) + geom_histogram(position='identity')


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Well I've done this many times. Something like so: cv::Mat matSrc; // this is a CV_32FC1 normalised image int nHistSize = 65536; float fRange[] = { 0.0f, 1.0f }; const float* fHistRange = { fRange }; cv::Mat matHist; cv::calcHist(&matSrc, 1, 0, cv::Mat(), matHist, 1, &nHistSize, &fHistRange); As it says in the documentation describing the ...


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Something like this? # generate example set.seed(1) df <- data.frame(Type=c(rep("A",1000),rep("B",4000)), Value=c(rnorm(1000,mean=25,sd=10),rchisq(4000,15))) # you start here... library(ggplot2) ggplot(df, aes(x=Value))+ geom_histogram(aes(y=..density..,fill=Type),color="grey80")+ facet_grid(Type~.) Note that there are 4 times as ...


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Data as factor can be used as input to the plot function. An answer to a similar question has been given here: https://stat.ethz.ch/pipermail/r-help/2010-December/261873.html x=sample(c("Richard", "Minnie", "Albert", "Helen", "Joe", "Kingston"), 50, replace=T) x=as.factor(x) plot(x)


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You need to add the 'extent' parameter to you imshow command. imshow accepts a grid of arbitrary values but does not know the dimensions.


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If you don't care about the labels, you could do something like this: vec.test <- seq(-2, 2, by=0.5) names(vec.test) <- cut(abs(vec.test), c(-1, 1, 2), right=FALSE, labels=FALSE) * (-1)^(vec.test <= -1 ) #<NA> -2 -2 1 1 1 2 2 <NA> #-2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0


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First, you're writing a function instead of a macro (see here). Then, even though I don't know anything about ROOT, providing function parameters is pretty simple. For your example: string subtracthist(TH1F *h1, TH1F *h2) { TH1F *h3 = new TH1F("h3","Subtracted Histograms",100,-3,3); h3->Add(h1,h2,1,-1); // Caluclate Total number of bins in ...


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I pefere to plot the histogram for Red, Green and Blue in one plot: %Split into RGB Channels Red = image(:,:,1); Green = image(:,:,2); Blue = image(:,:,3); %Get histValues for each channel [yRed, x] = imhist(Red); [yGreen, x] = imhist(Green); [yBlue, x] = imhist(Blue); %Plot them together in one plot plot(x, yRed, 'Red', x, yGreen, 'Green', x, yBlue, ...


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If your question is "why does this not display any plots?", then the answer is this: In the R command line, just typing a variable name or an expression invokes the print method. This does not happen in functions, or in loops, or when using source(...), so to cause anything to display (print or plot), you need to do that explicitly. But this is only part of ...


3

What you're doing should work perfectly. Is it possible that only one of the distributions is in the x-range of -1.5 to 1 that you've set a couple of lines before? (i.e. Try removing the manual set_xlim statement and see if the other distributions show up.) As a quick, stand-alone example to demonstrate that things should work: import numpy as np import ...


1

Thiago, You can also try it directly from the categorical variables with scipy's itemfreq method. Here's an example: >>> import scipy as sp >>> rv = ['do', 're', 'do', 're', 'do', 'mi'] >>> note_frequency = sp.stats.itemfreq(rv) >>> note_frequency array([['do', '3'], ['mi', '1'], ['re', '2']], ...


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So here my last try, but strongly suggest you to learn at the basics of python and matplotlib. def step_hist(ax, X, num_x_bins=10, hatch_from= -2, hatch_till=0.5, orientation='h'): #make histogram by hand. hist, edges = np.histogram(X, bins=num_x_bins) #generate (x,y) points for a step-plot edges ...


1

I like @Christoph's answer, but here are a couple of other workarounds: 1) You can change the xlabel to "\nUtilization", which will add a newline and move the text to the next row. 2) You can also use a regular label and turn off the xlabel, which can allow more flexibility: unset xlabel set label "Utilization" at graph 0.5,0.1 font ",18"



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