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1

It'd be easier to represent your histogram as a dictionary, as then you could directly access elements that match x. However, as is (assuming you're forced to use lists), here's how you'd solve this problem: def add_to_hist(x,hist): for i in range(len(hist)): if x == hist[i][0]: hist[i][1] = hist[i][1] + 1 return hist ...


0

You choose to represent your histogram as a list of 2-element-lists; however in your add_to_hist function, in the else branch, you append the item itself. You should append [x, 1]. Also, for the same reason, you cannot check if x in hist, because x is an item (str), but the elements of hist are lists. There are also other errors in your function (incorrect ...


0

If you don't need groupby (I don't see that it gains you anything in this case), then you can easily set colors: ax1 = plt.subplot(111) df[df['gender']=='M'].hist(ax=ax1, color='red', label='M') df[df['gender']=='F'].hist(ax=ax1, color='blue', label='F') ax1.legend(loc='best')


0

d = {'gender' : Series(['M', 'F', 'F', 'F', 'M']),'year' : Series([1900, 1910, 1920, 1920, 1920])} df = DataFrame(d) grouped = df.groupby('gender').year grouped.plot(kind='hist',legend=True)


0

I contend this is a bug. Under the default arguments, the breakpoints are supposed to be right-closed, left open. Based on the documentation, for breaks=c(9, 10, 11, 12,13,14,15), breakpoints should be (9, 10], (10, 11], (11,12], (12,13], (13,14], (14,15]. Which would mean that the 9's wouldn't be plotted at all. It seems that hist is deciding that ...


0

With your data: myData <- data.frame(case = 1:48, group = c(1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3), age = c(70,68,61,68,77,72,64,65,69,67,71,75,73,68,65,69,63,70,78,73,76,78,65,68,75,65,62,69,70,71,60,69,60,66,75,70,62,63,79,79,66,76,64,61,70,67,69,63), ...


0

Image<Gray, Byte> img_gray = new Image<Gray, Byte(frame1_hist.Image.Bitmap); DenseHistogram hist = new DenseHistogram(256, new RangeF(0.0f, 255.0f)); // Histogram Computing hist.Calculate<Byte>(new Image<Gray, byte>[] { img_gray }, true, null);


0

You need to convert the attitude data to long data format first - e.g., by using melt from reshape2: attitudeM <- melt(attitude) Then you can facet your ggplot by variable and automatically create separate histograms for each dimension. g <- ggplot(attitudeM,aes(x=value)) g <- g + geom_histogram() g <- g + facet_wrap(~variable) g


0

I found a way to do it: you first have to change the formatting of the rgb colours changing the commas to spaces, so that the new file becomes: A 12.0 255 20 147 B 325.0 255 255 0 C 134456.0 255 255 0 D 13869.0 0 0 0 E 4321.0 255 0 0 F 43676.0 165 42 42 then you have to instruct gnuplot on how to parse the rgb colours: rgb(r,g,b) = int(r)*65536 + ...


1

The calculation time is linear with the number of pixels. You essentially take each pixel once and put it into a bin. Doing any transform on them ahead of time will result in undoing the time savings. As such doing something like resizing or creating a new image will defeat the purpose. The best way to realize any savings would be to role your own ...


2

I think you have a typo. SuitHist is expecting an array of type Card[] but in IsFlush you have deck as type Cards[]. Try changing the function like so: public static boolean IsFlush(Card[] deck){ .... }


1

This is a small bug in matplotlib that was first introduced in this commit. Basically, the vertices of all of the bin edges are set to 'snap' to the nearest pixel center, with the exception of the first bin. This was done in order to fix another bug, where snapping the first bin edge prevented the histogram bins from aligning properly with corresponding line ...


0

You should use stat=identity to tell ggplot to use the gdp values without any transformation. combined <- data.frame(countrygdp=letters[1:6],gdp=runif(6)) library(ggplot2) qplot(x = countrygdp, y = gdp, data = combined, geom ="histogram",stat="identity")


1

Use cv::resize() with nearest-neighbor "interpolation" to sub-sample the image every 10th pixel along both axes. Then calculate the histogram on the sub-sampled image. Beyond using an extra 1% memory (beyond your image), it should be as efficient as calculating the histogram on the fly.


0

You can use logical indexing to build a histogram only using values in your specified range. For example you might do something like: histogram(imgData(imgData < 250))


2

You can collect all image pixel intensities that are less than 250. That's effectively performing the same thing. If your image was stored in A, you can simply do: pix = A(A < 250); pix will be a single vector of all image pixels in A that have intensity of 249 or less. From there, you can perform whatever operations you want, such as the average, ...


1

Checkout the following: ChartJS Highcharts Chartist Flot for jQuery I have used ChartJS and Highcharts - the latter is extremely full featured and gives a lot of control. Have also used Harry Plotter which is really lightweight and easy to use, but doesn't provide a great deal of styling control.


1

As I understand it, you are getting this result: library(e1071) set.seed(357) tds <- sample(1:nrow(iris), 10) iris.train <- iris[-tds, ] iris.test <- iris[tds, ] model <- svm(Species ~ ., data = iris, probability = TRUE) predict(model, newdata = iris.test, probability = TRUE) 17 9 42 34 96 68 ...


0

SCaVis Java program uses Jython to make histograms. You can draw histograms in 2D (H1D class) and 3D (H2D class)


1

Perhaps this would work for you: it creates a data frame with the x elements being the letters a through 'e', and the y elements being the numbers 1 through 5. It then renders a histogram and tells ggplot not to perform any binning. library(ggplot2) tmp <- data.frame(x = letters[1:5], y = 1:5) ggplot(tmp, aes(x = x, y = y)) + geom_histogram(stat = ...


1

You are plotting the factor levels of each column for row 2, which is in this case always 1. When creating the dataframe you add stringsAsFactors=FALSE to avoid converting the numbers to factors. This should work: z = data.frame(a,b,c,d,e,stringsAsFactors=FALSE) hist(as.numeric(z[2,]))


1

The problem is that you convert the string to lower case before nul terminating it. Here i = 0; do { fflush(stdin); c = getchar(); string[i++] = c; } while (c != '\n'); /* Goes here <---------------------+ */ /* | */ //pretvori v majhne crke | */ char *p; /* ...


0

You can also use the histogram function as follows: [C,~,ic] = unique(A); fig1 = figure; axes1 = axes('Parent',fig1,'XTickLabel',C,'XTick',1:length(C)); hold(axes1,'on'); histogram(ic)


0

you can perfectly have 2 different scale in matplotlib. See documentation here: http://matplotlib.org/examples/api/two_scales.html complete code here : import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib.dates as mdates #the dates for plotting (numpy array) date1 = ...


1

Matplotlib uses its own format for dates/times, but also provides simple functions to convert which are provided in the dates module. It also provides various Locators and Formatters that take care of placing the ticks on the axis and formatting the corresponding labels. This should get you started: import random import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import ...


1

You should allocate enough space for descriptors before calling it. There's only a empty container by vector <vector <float> > descriptors;, it will crash if you trying to access its elements, i.e. descriptors[0], because descriptors.size()==0 currently. You can simply change vector <vector <float> > descriptors; to vector ...


1

imhist only shows the histogram, not the PDF. If you're looking for the PDF of X, you can use: histogram( X(:), 'Normalization', 'probability' ); axis tight EDIT: Full code I = imread('sample.jpg'); level = graythresh(I); X = rgb2gray(I); A = im2bw(X,level); A2 = im2bw(X,58/255); B = medfilt2(A2); figure, imshow(I) figure; histogram( X(:), ...


0

Use return (int) (Math.random()*(high-low)+low); as your function body instead.


2

Check this public static int randInt(int min, int max) { Random rand = new Random(); // nextInt is normally exclusive of the top value, // so add 1 to make it inclusive int randomNum = rand.nextInt((max - min) + 1) + min; return randomNum; }


7

x is between 0 and 1. In order for e to be between low and high, you need: e=(high-low)*x+low;


0

Here is a reproducible example of the behaviour you are looking for. It is copied from FAQ: How to order the (factor) variables in ggplot2 # sample data. d <- data.frame(Team1=c("Cowboys", "Giants", "Eagles", "Redskins"), Win=c(20, 13, 9, 12)) # basic layer and options p <- ggplot(d, aes(y=Win)) # default plot (left panel) # the variables are ...


1

Suppose the dictionary is all lower-case. 1-letter words have a sum in the range 97-122. 2-letter words have a sum in the range 194-244. 3-letter words have a sum in the range 291-366. 4-letter words have a sum in the range 388-488. 5-letter words have a sum in the range 485-610. Only now are the ranges starting to overlap, and even then only for words ...


5

What you are plotting is a histogram of added-up ASCII values for white-space delimited strings in a text file. Following the name I assume it is a dictionary of English words. English is mainly written in lower-case letters, which have ASCII-codes from 97 (a) to 122 (z), on average 110 (disregarding letter frequencies). The histogram shows peaks at ...


0

In addition to great answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/10363145/916682, you can use phpmyadmin chart tool for a nice result:


1

In java whenever a variable is declared, it have a certain scope. When you declare a variable inside a loop, it is only accessible inside that loop. Because the variable you are returning is declared inside the for loop, this is why it is giving an error. Try declaring a variable outside the loop and then access that in the for loop. You code will look like ...


1

In Java, the scope of a variable is bound by { } characters (in Javascript this is not the case). That means if a variable is declared in a set of {} (curly brackets), it cannot be referenced outside of these brackets. This is the case in your code. The variable e is declared in the loop, so you can not use it in the function's return statement. I would ...


-1

You're declaring the variable e inside the loop, then trying to reference it from outside that loop. The below should work: public static int randomInt(int low, int high) { int e; for (int i=0;i<10;i++) { double x=Math.random(); e=(int)x*high/low; } return e; }


0

A method can return only one value (in your case one int), but it can be a composite value (array or object). In this case, you are better off having a loop call your method a bunch of times, and do whatever it needs to do with the result. Technically, int e's scope is inside the loop body since it is declared inside there. The following code will generate ...


1

This is not a weird behaviour: ggplot2 simply operates on data.frame objects - and not vectors: ggplot(data.frame(x=c(1,2,3,3,4,5)), aes(x=x)) + geom_histogram()


0

You want to generate 100 random numbers between 1 and 10, but your code generates 10 random numbers between 0 (inclusive) and 99 (inclusive). You have to change your first for loop to loop 100 times instead of 10 and change the line int randomint = r.nextInt(100); to int randomint = 1 + r.nextInt(10); This will guarantee a number on interval [1,10] ...


2

As @user20650 kindly suggested in the comments, theme_classic() is a simple option to do what I was trying to achieve. Additionally, to move the x-axis just below the bars, scale_y_continuous(expand=c(0,0)) can be used. Thank you!


0

It looks like you have a problem with your opencv_imgproc248.dll library on the native part, not in your code.


0

Why don't you scale [0-2] histogram to [0-255]? oldValue * 255 / 2.


1

In Python opencv uses numpy arrays as data structures for images. So cv2.imread returns a numpy array. Matplotlib has a similar function, so for the example in your question you need neither opencv nor pil: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt im = plt.imread('pic.jpg') if im.shape[2] == 3: # Input image is three channels fig = plt.figure() ...


0

I've added to @lxop's answer to allow for arbitrary size buckets: from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d') x = np.array([0, 2, 5, 10, 2, 3, 5, 2, 8, 10, 11]) y = np.array([0, 2, 5, 10, 6, 4, 2, 2, 5, 10, 11]) # This example actually counts the ...


1

The lattice plot functions will print the level of the conditioning variables (variables after the |) above the panels as long as the conditioning variables are factors. If the conditioning variables are numeric, which is my guess in your case, the values will not be printed automatically. So there are two ways to go about answering your request First, ...


0

Going by your example input file, when loading, you need to specify header=F as there's no header. When loading, you need sep='\t' to use a tab separator. table() does count frequencies, but since your input data already has frequencies, there's no need to call it here. You can label the slices with percentages, but you have to calculate them yourself and ...


2

There are many ways to do this in R, all involving variations on the "split-apply-combine" strategy (split the data into groups, apply a function to each group, combine the results by group back into a single data frame). Here's one method using the dplyr package. I've created some fake data for illustration, since your data is not in an easily ...


0

First, you probably need to make your viewing window bigger- I at least saw two dates when I ran your code. Second, you will want your axis labels to be perpendicular to the axis, which you can do with the las option (relevant answer). axis.POSIXct(1, at=seq(as.Date("2015-01-01"), as.Date("2015-04-01"), by="1 days"), format="%d %b %y", las=2) If you do ...


0

try labels in the function pd.cut . tlag = np.arange(0, 30, 2) tbins = np.arange(0, 100, 10) pd.value_counts(np.cut(tlag, tbins, labels = tbins[:-1])) the output is: Out[136]: 0 5 10 5 20 4



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