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0

I found what I wanted. Here it is : levels(cut(VARIABLE,breaks=hist(VARIABLE,seq(0,230,by=3))$breaks))


1

This might be a bit late, but I decided to make a package (ggExtra) for this since it involved a bit of code and can be tedious to write. The package also tries to address some common issue such as ensuring that even if there is a title or the text is enlarged, the plots will still be inline with one another. The basic idea is similar to what the answers ...


0

You can specify intervals with: set.seed(7) x=rnorm(100,10,3) hist(x, breaks=seq(10,20,by=2)) Which produces: The option breaks specifies the intervals for the histogram (note: breaks must be inclusive of all values of x otherwise you will get the following error: Error in hist.default(x, breaks = seq(10, 20, by = 2)) : some 'x' not counted; ...


0

I think you're asking two questions here. How to get the histogram to go from 0-N: Use Processing's sort() function to sort the array. hist = sort(hist); // sorts your array numerically How to get the histogram to fill the screen: I'm not entirely sure why it's drawing twice, but I think you can clean up your code quite a bit. // how far apart are the ...


1

I think I may have figured it out. I changed the declaration of myHistogram to: var myHistogram = d3.layout.histogram() (studentSymbols.map(x));


0

You're not getting value ranges, because you converted d to a factor. Leave it as numeric, and you'll get bars that span ranges. Also, I've converted your data to a data frame, because ggplot requires a data frame. dat = data.frame(d=d) ggplot(dat, aes(x=d)) + geom_histogram(breaks=seq(0,max(dat$d)+10,10), fill="lightblue", ...


0

this script should work. X = LOAD 'pigpatient.txt' using PigStorage(' ') AS (pid:int,str:chararray); X1 = FOREACH X GENERATE pid,STRSPLIT(str, ',') AS (y:tuple()); X2 = FOREACH X1 GENERATE pid,SIZE(y) as numofcitan; dump X2; X3 = group X2 by numofcitan; Histograms = foreach X3 GENERATE group as numofcitan,COUNT(X2.pid); dump Histograms; input: ...


1

ggplot2 makes it relatively straightforward to plot normalized histograms of groups with unequal size. Here's an example with fake data: library(ggplot2) # Fake data (two normal distributions) set.seed(20) dat1 = data.frame(x=rnorm(1000, 100, 10), group="A") dat2 = data.frame(x=rnorm(2000, 120, 20), group="B") dat = rbind(dat1, dat2) ggplot(dat, aes(x, ...


0

Did you try looking at Java Flight Recorder (JFR). It is now included as part of Java 7 & 8. You can profile your application using JFR and later analyze using Java Mission Control. It provides a comprehensive view of what is going on inside the VM.


1

As already pointed out, this is problematic because the plots you want to merge have such different y-scales. You can try set.seed(15) mydata<-runif(50) hist(mydata, freq=F) lines(ecdf(mydata)) to get


2

There are two ways to go about this. One is to ignore the different scales and use relative frequency in your histogram. This results in a harder to read histogram. The second way is to alter the scale of one or the other element. I suspect this question will soon become interesting to you, particularly @hadley 's answer. ggplot2 single scale Here is a ...


1

Did you mean something like this? it is HSV histogram showed as 3D graph V is ignored to get to 3D (otherwise it would be 4D graph ...) if yes then this is how to do it (do not use OpenCV so adjust it to your needs): convert source image to HSV compute histogram ignoring V value all colors with the same H,S are considered as single color no matter ...


0

If i you right understand: let arr = [| [|1; 2; 4 |] ;[|3; 2; 4 |] ;[|1; 7; 4 |] |] arr |> Array.concat |> Array.sort |> Seq.groupBy id |> Seq.map(fun el -> fst el,Seq.length (snd el)) |> Seq.iter(fun x -> printfn "%d [%d]" (fst x) (snd x))) Out: 1 [2] 2 [2] 3 [1] 4 [3] 7 [1] http://ideone.com/P5hmtU


2

SimpleHistogramBin is a good choice for this, as it allows specifying the bin bounds. Add the resulting bins to a SimpleHistogramDataset for use with ChartFactory.createHistogram(). Invoke setAdjustForBinSize() as needed. SimpleHistogramDataset data = new SimpleHistogramDataset("Time"); for (int i = 10; i < 70; i += 10) { data.addBin(new ...


4

If you set the line parameter in the title call to, for example, -2, you can place the title closer to the histograms: a=1 p = c(rnorm(1000,5,10)) l = c(rnorm(1000,10,5)) par(mfrow=c(1,2)) hist(p,main=NULL) hist(l,main=NULL) title(main=print(paste0("Histogram a=", a)),outer=T, line=-2)


0

Have a look at how factors work, with ?factor, or looking at the example question here. In essence, each level is given a number starting at 1, hence ending at 11 if you have 11 unique values. Conversion of a factor to numeric returns these codes, rather than the underlying numbers they relate to. To do this, first convert to character, then to numeric. See ...


3

We can use barplot in the following way to show counts of 1's for each unique value of the character variable # Generate sample data uniqueCarrier <- unlist(lapply(1:10, function(i) rep(paste(sample(letters,size = 3), collapse=""),10))) Delay <- rbinom(100, 1, prob = rep(c(.30, .2, .1, .5, .7, .6, .9, .2, .7, .6),each = 10)) # Create the plot ...


-1

a{1,1} = [5 4 3 2]; a{2,1} = []; a{3,1} = [5 4 3 2 8]; a{4,1} = [5 3 ]; a{5,1} = [5]; a{6,1} = [3 4 5 6 7 8]; a{7,1} = [5 3 2]; lns = cellfun(@length,a); mx = max(lns); mat = NaN; for ii = 1:numel(a); a{ii,1} = [a{ii,1} mat(1,ones(1,mx-lns(ii)))]; end array_vec=cell2mat(a);


3

The worth-a-read answer in the comments was using the same example of plotrix::gap.barplot that I picked but I've been working on those "squiggly lines": require(plotrix) twogrp<-c(rnorm(10)+4,rnorm(10)+20) gap.barplot(twogrp, gap=c(8,16), xlab="Index", ytics=c(3,6,17,20), ylab="Group values", main="Barplot with gap") polygon(y=c( ...


0

The solution Find H-S histogram Find peak H value(using minmaxLoc function) Split image 3 channel(h,s,v) Apply to threshold. Create image by merge 3 channel


0

As nobody answer i ll try to give answer : Please don`t force optimizer to follow you (1) Explanation about you original query : SELECT d.DetailId FROM dbo.DetailTable d INNER JOIN dbo.MasterTable m ON d.MasterId = m.MasterId WHERE m.Name = 'N8' AND d.CreateDate > '20150312 11:00:00' Why this query is slow ? this query is slow because your indexes ...


0

Thank you tcasewell, adding import matplotlib # Force matplotlib to not use any Xwindows backend. matplotlib.use('Agg') Before importing pyplot solved the problem.


2

Is this what you expected: ggplot(temp, aes(x=as.POSIXct(temp$Time,format="%H:%M"))) + geom_histogram( fill="lightblue", binwidth = 15*60, # 15 min *60 sec/min color="grey50") Note that these "times" are all on different days, but that the conversion to POSIXct format will implicitly make then all with today's date, so it might ...


2

If you don't care about zeros, don't pass them to hist: hist(I(I~=0),100)


0

For when you need to adjust the text. Found this SO post: Name of Variable in R sweet = rnorm(100) plot.histogram <- function (x){ hist(x, main = paste("Awesome Histogram of",substitute(x)), xlab = paste(substitute(x))) } plot.histogram(sweet) Updated to use a data.table x = data.table( ...


1

Your curve and histograms are on different y scales and you didn't check the help page on stat_function, otherwise you'd've put the arguments in a list as it clearly shows in the example. You also aren't doing the aes right in your initial ggplot call. I sincerely suggest hitting up more tutorials and books (or at a minimum the help pages) vs learn ggplot ...


0

There is no getRaster() method in the Android Bitmap class. Instead you can call getPixel() on the Bitmap directly. The function returns an integer ARGB value, which you can separate into its various components: int pixel = bi.getPixel(i, j); //increase if same pixel appears levels[Color.red(pixel)]++; You can set a pixel like this: int rgb = ...


3

Matplotlib uses a color cycle with predefined colors. You could modify this color cycle to your liking, but it is cleaner if you directly specify the colors in the call to hist. It is tedious to specify the colors manually, so you could use one of matplotlibs colormaps to generate them. In the example below, I also used a colormap from colorbrewer as those ...


0

Your function histPercent is not correctly being put, so you are not getting any output. Try the below code... R Code: #!/usr/bin/env Rscript #for all .txt files in a directory for(i in 1:length(list.files(pattern="*.txt"))) { #reading data histo = read.table(list.files(pattern="*.txt")[i]) #cutting off ".txt" name = ...


1

All numbers in the range 25-75 are used for the histogram. For arrays numbers1 and numbers3, that are exactly 51 numbers since both 25 and 75 are included. You force these numbers in 25 bins, which means that there will be 24 bins of height 2/51 and one of height 3/51. Matplotlib chooses to put 73, 74 and 75 all in the last bin and make that the largest. ...


0

The solution I came up with addresses the lack of up-front information about the population by using reservoir sampling. Reservoir sampling lets you efficiently take a random sample of a given size, from a population of an unknown size. See Wikipedia for more details. Reservoir sampling provides a random sample regardless of whether the stream is ordered or ...


2

The problem was under-binning as mentioned by cel, see comments above. It was clarifying to set bins=100 in pd.DataFrame.histo() which defaults to bins=10. See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histogram#Number_of_bins_and_width


1

If you increase the bandwidth using the bw_method parameter, then the kde will look smoother. This example comes from Justin Peel's answer; the code has been modified to take advantage of the bw_method: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np from scipy.stats import gaussian_kde data = [1.5]*7 + [2.5]*2 + [3.5]*8 + [4.5]*3 + [5.5]*1 + [6.5]*8 ...


2

It's not clear to me why you need a statistical test if all you want to do is compute which one is closest. Below I'm just computing the histograms directly and comparing their distances. Generate data: v1 <- c(0.2500, 0.4375, 0.1250, 0.3125, 0.0000, 0.5625, 0.1250, 0.1875, 0.1875, 0.1875, 0.1875) v2 <- c(2, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 2, 1, 2)*0.1 v3 ...


-1

R has a bug or something. If you have discrete data in a data.frame (with 1 column), and call hist(DF,freq=FALSE) on it, the relative densities will be wrong (summing to >1). This shouldn't happen as far as I can tell. The solution is to call unlist() on the object first. This fixes the plot. (I changed the text too, data from ...


1

You can do it like this: value <- rnorm(300,mean=100,sd=20) nf <- layout(mat = matrix(c(1,2),2,1, byrow=TRUE), height = c(1,3)) par(mar=c(4,4,1,1)) boxplot(value, horizontal=TRUE, outline=TRUE,ylim=c(0,160), frame=F, col = "green1") hist(value,breaks=40,xlab="Runs",ylab="Runs frequency", main = "Score")


0

You can add to the second "barplot" function the argument "add=T": barplot(t(cbind(d1/sum(d1)*100, d2/sum(d2)*100)), beside=T, col=c("black","red"), border=F, add=T) which will make the two histograms be on the same figure, and even share the same x-axis.


0

Your question provide very poor information and insight in your code. More data.. Meanwhile check if you actually import your modules correctly, should have: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt in order to use hist function


1

You can use the next function based on tucson function to plot a histogram in 3d. my_hist3d <- function(x, y, freq=FALSE, nclass="auto") { n<-length(x) if (nclass == "auto") { nclass<-ceiling(sqrt(nclass.Sturges(x))) } breaks.x <- seq(min(x),max(x),length=(nclass+1)) breaks.y <- seq(min(y),max(y),length=(nclass+1)) h <- NULL ...


3

Use histc instead of hist. histc allows you to define the edges while hist uses the second input parameter as centers.


1

The problem is your x axis being continuous. Try this by using: library(ggplot2) ylim <- c(0, 1.1*max(plot_data$CLV)) ggplot(plot_data, aes(x=as.factor(CLV.decile), y=CLV)) + geom_histogram(stat="identity",fill="skyblue",colour="black") + labs(x="Decile",y="CLV") + geom_text(aes(label=CLV), vjust=-1) + ylim(ylim) + ...


0

The same kind of problem has been solved in this thread. Adapting the solution to your problem, we need to make a script to convert the date into the hour of day: Date date = new Date(doc['created_at'].value) ; java.text.SimpleDateFormat format = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat('HH'); format.format(date) And use it in a query: { "aggs": { ...


0

# 1) Define the breaks to use on your Histogram xrange = seq(-3,3,0.1) # 2) Have your vectors ready v1 = rnorm(n=300,mean=1.1,sd=1.5) v2 = rnorm(n=350,mean=1.3,sd=1.5) v3 = rnorm(n=380,mean=1.2,sd=1.9) # 3) subset your vectors to be inside xrange v1 = subset(v1,v1<=max(xrange) & v1>=min(xrange)) v2 = subset(v2,v2<=max(xrange) & ...


1

If we can't make any assumptions about the data, you are going to have to make a pass to determine bin size. This means that you have to either start with a bin size rather than bin number or live with a two-pass model. I'd just use linear interpolation to estimate positions between bins, then do a binary search from there. Of course, if you can make some ...


-1

histogram work as you said. It's not easy to help you with as little information about your code. For me the error can come from 2 ways : the plot context definition need to be in bar (i.e image) the x-range plot definition need to be defined for the 2nd hypothese some thing like set-plot-x-range 0 ( (max myliste) + 5) histogram myliste let maxbar ...


2

You didnĀ“t use quotes in your histogram list, but I am assuming that you wanted to plot a list of strings like ["a" "b" "c" ...], right? As far as I know, it is not possible to use categorical values (like strings) for a histogram in netlogo plots. This is also stated in the netlogo dictionary: histogram [...] Any non-numeric values in the list are ignored. ...


5

Pretty sure you can just use cumulative=-1 in your function call: plt.hist(d, 50, histtype="stepfilled", alpha=.7, cumulative=-1) From the matplotlib hist() docs: If cumulative evaluates to less than 0 (e.g., -1), the direction of accumulation is reversed. Take a look at the third example image here; I think it does what you want.


0

I think that using a histogram is not a best option in this situation. Generally in such cases the simplest (and usually - good enough) option is to: Convert image to HSV color space Use inRange function to find parts of image with some color Find the biggest contour on the result of previous step. If this contour is bigger than some threshold value than ...


1

After you have plotted the four graph, you can fix the left margin to the value it has at this momen, and adapt the right margin according to the different scales from graph four to graph five. You can calculate the left margin in screen coordinates (i.e. in the range [0:1], with 0 beeing the leftmost canvas edge and 1 the rightmost canvas edge) as follows: ...


1

I made up some data for illustration: head(iris) table(iris$Species) df <- iris df$Species2 <- ifelse(df$Species == "setosa", "blue", ifelse(df$Species == "virginica", "red", "")) library(ggplot2) p <- ggplot(df, aes(x = Sepal.Length, colour = (Species == "setosa"))) p + geom_density() # Your example # Now let's choose the ...



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