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0

Based on my interpretation of what I think you meant: create traditional histogram counts with probabilities binned (horizontally, as usual), for some binsize. Just for the dataframe as is with Truth==0 now augment that dataframe with complementary probability values (1-pC) for that bin for Truth==1 now plot the augmented df as a stacked bar-chart ...


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Presumably you've figured it out a long time ago but I just had a recent requirement to do the same and saw your question. The idea is just to make PointWidth close to 1.0. Example code in https://github.com/bohdanszymanik/Histogram/blob/master/hist.fsx


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Well the back projection calculates the probability of a pixel whether it belongs to statistical model or not, look here OpenCV Back Projection. The reason you are encountering "White Areas" outside the target object can be because your object model is very generic. Can you provide some resultant images to further clarify your problem.


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Use a bar plot instead of a histogram, as the histogram expects to calculate the frequencies for you: library(ggplot2) # make some data to exercise income = c(-22.024, -25.027, -28.030, -31.033, -34.036, -37.039,-40.042) freq = c(5,13,16,9,4,2,2) df <- data.frame(income, freq) df <- names(c("income","freq")) # the graph object p <- ...


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I am building on what Ilya Volodin did above, that should allow you to select a range of grade you want to group together in your result: DECLARE @cnt INT = 0; WHILE @cnt < 100 -- Set max value BEGIN SELECT @cnt,COUNT(fe) FROM dbo.GEODATA_CB where fe >= @cnt-0.999 and fe <= @cnt+0.999 -- set tolerance SET @cnt = @cnt + 1; -- set step END;


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What histfit does is plotting a pdf normalized to the scale of the histogram. A scaling factor of numel(p).*mean(diff(x)) is applied to match the curve with the histogram. It scales the area under the pdf to the area the histogram covers.


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Since you haven't provided example data, I am showing a basic example using random data. You can create breaks to group your data using the function cut and then boxplot to create the chart. Base set.seed(12) y <- rnorm(1000) x <- rnorm(1000) rng <- seq(-3, 3, 0.5) boxplot(y ~ cut(x, breaks = rng), las = 2) Using ggplot2 set.seed(12) ...


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Or you can change it in editing mode (pencil symbol) in GUI interface - click on Edit (pencil) and then change mode "Line" to Mode "Bar". (printscreen from Histogram exemple)


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If the focus is on plotting, then I would suggest another variation of the ideas proposed in the answer of @jlhoward. This showed the conditional distribution of "dollar amount" (DA) given the "payment type" (PT), using histograms or densities. The same is true for the boxplots proposed by @thothal which show the conditional distribution of DA given PT. But ...


1

How about this: val num_bins = 20 val mx = a.max.toDouble val mn = a.min.toDouble val hist = a .map(x=>(((x.toDouble-mn)/(mx-mn))*num_bins).floor.toInt) .groupBy(x=>x) .map(x=>x._1->x._2.size) .toSeq .sortBy(x=>x._1) .map(x=>x._2)


2

To complement Dan's solution. In the case where there are several identique values in your sample, you can use numpy.unique : Z = np.array([1,1,1,2,2,4,5,6,6,6,7,8,8]) X, F = np.unique(Z, return_index=True) F=F/X.size plt.plot(X, F)


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We could have also done a as.numeric() on the column. typeof(data$hourofcrime) # gives me a list #> typeof(data$hourofcrime) #[1] "list" hour_crime_rate <- as.numeric(data$hourofcrime) hist(hour_crime_rate)


2

As others have said, there are lots of ways to do this. I'd be inclined to start by overlaying the distributions with density plots. Your sample has too few cases for this to be useful, so the code below creates an artificial example with 2000 cases. In this example, eCheck payments are normally distributed with mean = $100 and sd = $25, and Credit Card ...


3

There are various models to use when you have a scale\continuous independent variable and a binary dependent variable. But, you should (strictly) specify your objective, otherwise you'll get lost in the options you have. Logistic regression is one option and especially useful when you want to investigate relationships between variables, as the output ...


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For starters I would do a boxplot for each of the categories and compare visually differences in the distribution. Data d <- structure(list(PaymentType = structure(c(2L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L), .Label = c("CreditCard", "eCheck"), class = "factor"), DollarAmount = c(114L, 114L, 39L, 16L, 16L, 114L, 228L, 228L, 228L, ...


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The assumption that a "breaking point" exists --- i.e., that the relationship is some sort of step function --- is a strong one that I would urge you to probe empirically before proceeding as if it were true. To do that, I would use logistic regression with smoothing splines to check for a nonlinear relationship. Let's assume your data set is named data and ...


1

In order to create a histogram you need to remove the "value" variable and create the corresponding number of rows for "x" based on that value. So, if for group A you have x = 3 and value = 10, the process has to create x = 3 for group A 10 times. Run the process step by step to see how it works. I've included decimals for "x". library(reshape2) ...


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The histogram, kdensity, and cumul commands all take frequency weights, which must be integers. The problem with sampling weights is that they can be non-integral. However you can create frequency weights that will be multiples of the probability weights and agree in precision to any desired accuracy. (The trick is due to Austin Nichols.) This will permit ...


1

You can use arithmetic to divide the values. Here is one method. It essentially takes the ceiling value of maxX / 5 and uses that to define the partitions: select (case when cast(maxX / params.n as int) = maxX / params.n then (x - 1) / (maxX / param.n) else (x - 1) / cast(1 + maxX / params.n as int) end) as category, ...


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You are trying to set an array of variant equal to a Range -- but that isn't possible since you can't assign to an array. You could assign a range to a simple Variant (or to a Range variable). You could change Dim Data() to Dim Data as Variant Note the absence of parenthesis. Also, as a stylistic point I think that it is good to be explicit about the ...


3

First I fix your function: rata<-function(N,r,u,d,S){ x <- numeric(N+1) for(i in 0:N){ x[i]<-S*u^{i}*d^{N-i} } return(x) } Or relying on vectorization: rata<-function(N,r,u,d,S){ x<-S*u^{0:N}*d^{N-(0:N)} return(x) } taf<-rata(100000,1,1.1,0.9,1) Looking at the result, we notice that it contains NaN values: taf[7440 ...


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You were close: class(MY_LIST[[1]][[2]]) Think of a list like a train: a single [ gets the carriage you want with all its contents, a double [[ gets just the contents of that carriage. Also think why MY_LIST[[1]][2]=HIST_OBJECT does not work, but MY_LIST[[1]][[2]]=HIST_OBJECT does. In this case, the [2] got you the same class as its container - a list, ...


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Another possible solution using ggplot2, however, so far I do not know how to scale the two plots in height: require(ggplot2) require(grid) fig1 <- ggplot(data = mtcars, aes(x = 1, y = mpg)) + geom_boxplot( ) + coord_flip() + scale_y_continuous(expand = c(0,0), limit = c(10, 35)) fig2 <- ggplot(data = mtcars, aes(x = mpg)) + ...


1

In case you haven't figured it out yet (or for the next person who comes along with a similar issue), there is a terrific blog post here about altering all axes things in hist3D: http://entrenchant.blogspot.co.uk/2014_03_01_archive.html


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For completeness, numpy.histogram is what I was looking for!


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The error graph this under the title "Plot based on Gauden's approach" is due to the binwidth parameter: ... + Geom_histogram (binwidth = 30, color = "white") + ... If we change the value of 30 to a value less than 20, such as 10, you will get all frequencies. In statistics the values are more important than the presentation is more important a bland ...


1

In general this is a bad idea - histograms show the continuity of data, and gaps ruin that. You can use the previous code with smaller gaps (your values hit the previous gaps): hist(varx,breaks=rep(1:7,each=2)+c(-.05,.05)) But this is not a general solution - any values closer than 0.05 to the cutoff will end up in the gap region. We can make a bar plot ...


1

The code works, but needs smaller numbers: varx <- c(1.234, 1.32, 1.54, 2.1 , 2.76, 3.2, 4.56, 5.123, 6.1, 6.9) hist(varx, breaks=rep(1:7,each=2)+c(-.04,.04), freq=T) This returns a warning as it prefers to return "density" instead of "frequency" after manually changing the breaks in that way. Change to freq=F if you prefer.


1

OpenCV is not really suited for plotting. However, for simple histograms, you can draw a rectangle for each column (eventually with alternating colors) This is the code: #include <opencv2\opencv.hpp> #include <algorithm> using namespace std; using namespace cv; void drawHist(const vector<int>& data, Mat3b& dst, int binSize = 3, ...


1

Gnuplot histograms don't have a conventional numerical axis. You could put a condition in the xtic, but that affects only the tic labels, but not the tics. To get a normal numerical axis you must plot with boxes, but that doesn't allow you to stack values. Or you plot and stack with boxxyerrorbars: set key autotitle columnhead set style fill solid border ...


0

gnuplot cannot sort and identify your data, you need to have six rows for six keys (=processes). Process_1 10 15 20 Process_2 10 0 0 Process_3 10 15 20 Process_4 0 35 0 Process_5 0 0 0 Process_6 0 0 20 Now you only plot the keys for the first iteration in column(2), and that`s it. set style data histogram set style fill solid border set style ...


0

Let me guess: positions are in pixels, and the particles do not move very many pixels between time points? What you're seeing are a bunch of discretization artifacts. Peak at 0 reflecting pixels that are either stationary or move toward the right Peaks at +/- 45 and 90 degrees reflecting particles moving one pixel up/down or along the diagonal. More ...


0

A secret weapon to make matplotlib plots look good is import seaborn. This overrides the mpl defaults with something nice. I would also make the bars bigger and move the xticks to the middle of the bars. Here is a slight tweak of your code to do so: import numpy as np, matplotlib.pyplot as plt, mpld3, seaborn as sns list = ...


0

I´ve found in the web a very simple way to do this (it´s not mine, and I don´t really know if this is allowed), the webpage is this https://chi3x10.wordpress.com/2008/03/10/histograms-of-two-set-of-data-with-different-color-in-matlab/ the code is this hist(data1); hold on; hist(data2); hist(data3); h = findobj(gca,’Type’,’patch’); display(h) ...


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I think what you want to do is to subset the data you're calling in the plot: ggplot(data=df[df$Petal.Width == 0.2,], aes(x=Sepal.Length, y=..density..*100)) + geom_bar(binwidth=0.1) + ylab("percent") Some other ways to subset data using ggplot are described in this post: Subset and ggplot2


0

If you can remember that you can scale up by a factor of 10 for both the data and the bin then you can use any of the above examples without worry about floating point issues. For example, just taking your workflow, here are the results by scaling your "a" array by 10 and converting to integer. >>> a = np.array([1.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2, 5, 8, 9, 2.3, ...


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You can use collections.Counter: >>> from collections import Counter >>> counter = Counter([1,2,5,3,2]) >>> counter[1] 1 Similarly, >>> counter = Counter([1.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2, 5, 8, 9, 2.3, 1.2]) >>> counter[1.2] 2 Use Counter.items() to get your key-value pairs: >>> counter.items() [(2, 1), (5, 1), ...


2

For an array of integers, you can use numpy.bincount. For example, In [59]: a = np.array([1,2,5,3,2]) In [60]: np.bincount(a) Out[60]: array([0, 1, 2, 1, 0, 1]) The return value is an array of counts of values from 0 up to the maximum found in the input. For the array of floating point values, you can use numpy.unique with the argument ...


1

Adding newfig=False to the second plt.plotfile() set of arguments will stop the second graph being plotted in a different figure. A full example of ths can be found here.


2

You could try something like this. ## Sample data set.seed(0) dat <- rlnorm(1000, 7) ## MLE estimates library(fitdistrplus) pars <- coef(fitdist(dat, "lnorm")) ## table variables breaks <- seq(1, max(dat)+100, 100) # histogram breaks mids <- diff(breaks)/2 + head(breaks, -1) # midpoints probs <- ...


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Mat hsvRef = new Mat(); Mat hsvCard = new Mat(); Mat srcRef = new Mat(refImage.getHeight(), refImage.getWidth(), CvType.CV_8UC2); Utils.bitmapToMat(refImage, srcRef); Mat srcCard = new Mat(cardImage.getHeight(), cardImage.getWidth(), CvType.CV_8UC2); Utils.bitmapToMat(cardImage, srcCard); /// Convert to HSV ...


0

There are several ways to approach this. Here's two: First define a calculated field that returns any non-null value for rows that match your filter criteria, and no value at all (i.e. null) otherwise. In the example below, the calculated field is called Matches Department and is defined as if [Department] = [Department to Show] then 1 end where Department ...


0

If you want to normalize each row, you can use: H_norm_rows = (H.T/np.sum(H,axis=1)).T


1

I think your code doesn't run in the first place, cause you are trying to assign the output of getPosition (a 1x4 array) to the single entries of another array, which doesn't work. After correcting this to position = getPosition(handles.pet_hist_rect); you can now access xmin as position(1), ymin as position(2) and so on. Now, ymin = position(2) is ...


2

The manual way: you can extract the histogram information using ggplot_build. Then find the maximum y-value, and the x-location of the corresponding bar in the histogram. library(ggplot2) data(diamonds) ## The plot as you have it q <- qplot(price, data = diamonds, geom = "histogram", col = 'blues') ## Get the histogram info/the location of the highest ...


1

Using tidyr, dplyr and base R hist x <- data.frame(Set_1 = c("abc89", "abc6", "abc90", 111), Set_2 = c("abc62", "pop", "a16", "abc15"), Set_3 = c(67, "abc11", "abc123", "abc72"), Set_4 = c("abc513", "abc4", "abc33", "abc36"), stringsAsFactors=F) require(tidyr) require(dplyr) x %>% gather(Set, val) ...


2

You can count the number of entries starting with "abc" in each row with y <- apply(df, 1, function(x) sum(grepl("^abc", x))) #> y #[1] 6 4 6 6 This result could be plotted in a histogram with hist(y, breaks=c(1:max(y)), main = "Frequency of 'abc' entries", col="lightblue") If you prefer a graphical representation of the value of "abc" counts ...


0

try renderChart2 instead of renderChart if the code you have works outside the shiny app: output$Histogram1 <- renderChart2({ Trial <- summaryBy(.~Age+Sex,data=Data,FUN=length) Histogram1 <- nPlot(x='Age',y='X.length',group='Sex',data=Trial,type='bar',dom='Histogram1') Histogram1$chart(margin = list(left = 100)) return(Histogram1) })


2

by default, pairplot uses the diagonal to "show the univariate distribution of the data for the variable in that column" (http://stanford.edu/~mwaskom/software/seaborn/generated/seaborn.pairplot.html). So each bar represent the count of values in the corresponding bin (that you can get from the X axis). The Y axis, however, does not correspond to the actual ...


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Updated: This should do the job: https://jsfiddle.net/t4ho787f/11/ $(document).ready(function () { var values = [79.86, 59.57, 39.64, 49.08, 21.34, 17.05, 30.8, 3.63, 4.71, 9.88, 67.55, 71.01, 60.3, 50.95, 60.37, 48.14, 51.9, 16.91, 3.52, 67.98]; var rawData2 = [17000, 30000, 25000, 22000, 25000, 20000, 25000, 35000, 20000, 20000, 18000, 15000]; ...



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