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0

Hi this change in this example got checked in just slightly too early. The problem is the bottom=0. That now works on master, but it was not changed yet for the release, so the example should not have been changed yet, either. For all of those, you just need to pass a full actual list of zeros: quad(top=hist, bottom=np.zeros_like(hist), left=edges[:-1], ...


1

If you do want to use lattice, you should use histogram() instead of hist(). subset() is useful too. set.seed(101) don <- data.frame(TGiving=round(rgamma(1000,shape=5,scale=100))) library(lattice) histogram(~TGiving,data=subset(don,TGiving!=0 & TGiving<1000))


1

This a pretty cluncky way of doing it. Perhaps it would be easier to see what was happening if you created a temporary variable with the first part of that expression which removes the values below 0 and then worked with it. temp <- don$TGiving[don$TGiving!=0] # remove items below 0 hist( temp[ temp < 1000 ] ) # remove items above 1000 ...


0

itertool is a powerful tool for all kind of permutations, etc. between different entities. Among other things, it does double "for" loops via the product function: from itertools import product KL = [kl(hist_mat[:,i],hist_mat[:,j]) for i,j in product( range(0,K), range(0,K) )] K being the number of histograms to compare in a pairwise manner, hist_mat ...


0

I solved the problem with a sliding window. It checks if the middle element of the windows is the max: if yes: append the solution to maxima-array. if not the window will shift one element to the right. To avoid very small maxima, I put a condition that it should be at least a certain level. Thank you.


0

I think the binning function you want is hist(x,width) = width*(floor(x/width+0.5)) This is an equivalent but simplified version of the earlier answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/13896530/834416 hist(x,width) = width*floor((x + width/2)/width) I had the same issue and posted an answer and sample code and output at ...


0

With respect to binning functions, I didn't expect the result of the functions offered so far. Namely, if my binwidth is 0.001, these functions were centering the bins on 0.0005 points, whereas I feel it's more intuitive to have the bins centered on 0.001 boundaries. In other words, I'd like to have Bin 0.001 contain data from 0.0005 to 0.0014 Bin 0.002 ...


0

DataFrame.hist() with by= returns the array of matplotlib Axes, so you could grab that and then iterate over it. For similar functionality that speaks pandas but has more flexible features you could use the FacetGrid object from seaborn.


0

I found Computation of Kullback-Leibler (KL) distance between text-documents using numpy which notes that SciPy has an implementation of KLD as scipy.stats.entropy(pk, qk=None, base=None) and documentation can be found at http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy-dev/reference/generated/scipy.stats.entropy.html ; this should make the calculation itself faster. ...


0

If you want to use a BufferedImage make your program an Applet


0

In barplot each column of the input matrix corresponds to a group of bars, and each row to different bars within groups. Because it seems like your groups are defined by the 'P' variable, you need to transpose the data. Then each column corresponds to one 'P date', and rows correspond to values for respectively I, R, F1, F2 and F3. The 'Value' of the ...


0

Looks like the easiest solution is to change your grouping to a factor: histogram( ~ data$num_child | as.factor(data$label),xlab="Number of children")


2

Here is how you do it: ggplot_build(p2)$data[[1]]


3

You can use the two outputs of imhist to obtain gray levels and count of each level. Use then the second output of max to obtain the index of the level whose count is maximum. Finally, the result is the level with that index. [count levels] = imhist(I); %// get levels and count of each level [~, v] = max(count); %// v is the index corresponding to maximum ...


2

It fails because you cannot add tuples. What you need are numpy arrays: import numpy as np a=np.array([45,22,17,28]) b=np.array([32,17,15,27]) c=np.array([15,18,22,25])


2

This should be the configuration you are looking for: You have to specify index c with a zorder > a and > b, i.e., (index c, ..., zorder=3); (index b, ..., zorder=2); (index a, ..., zorder=1). Your code should look like: a=(45,22,17,28) b=(32,17,15,27) c=(15,18,22,25) rects1 = plt.bar(index, a, bar_width, alpha=opacity, ...


1

scipy.stats.rv_discrete has you covered. It'll help you make a random distribution class from your data. The result will have a whole slew of handy methods. The .stats method will give you the first four moments. If you don't specify, it'll just return mean (m) and variance (v). b2=bin[:-1] print mean(a), var(a), scipy.stats.skew(a) dist = ...


0

Using default R graphics (i.e. without installing ggplot) you can do the following, which might also make what the density function does a bit clearer: # Generate some data data=rnorm(1000) # Get the density estimate dens=density(data) # Plot y-values scaled by number of observations against x values ...


2

You don't need to post all that settings for the tics, the labels and the multiplotting to show the problem. You can use e.g. linecolor variable to select different line types depending on the value in the first column: set terminal png enhanced set output 'foobar.png' set yrange [0:1] set style fill solid set linetype 1 lc rgb 'blue' set linetype 2 lc ...


0

To adapt the example on the ?stat_density help page: m <- ggplot(movies, aes(x = rating)) # Standard density plot. m + geom_density() # Density plot with y-axis scaled to counts. m + geom_density(aes(y = ..count..))


1

As indicated in Ji-Young Park's answer, the reading loop has problems because it uses negative indexes into the array wordsOfLength. I would keep life simple and have wordsOfLength[i] store the number of words of length i, though it effectively wastes wordsOfLength[0]. I would use the macros from <ctype.h> to spot word boundaries, and I'd keep a ...


0

I changed every CSV in this form: R1 R2 0.5 0.7 and my script: #!/usr/bin/env gnuplot set term pngcairo enhanced size 1500,700 set output 'accuracy_plot.png' set multiplot layout 1,4 set xlabel 'rounds' font ',16' set ylabel 'mean' font ',16' set xrange[1:2] set yrange[0:1.5] set style fill solid set grid xtics lt 0 lw 1 lc rgb "#333333" set grid ytics ...


0

The solution is: ggplot(all, aes(x=hvalues)) + facet_grid(season ~ year,drop=T) + geom_histogram(aes(y=(..count..)/tapply(..count..,..PANEL..,sum)[..PANEL..])) I stole this from: percentage on y lab in a faceted ggplot barchart? I feel your question might be a duplicate of that one by the way.


1

bglstat = np.array([9.0, 10.0, 2.0, 7.0, 7.0, 4.0]) candyn = np.array([2.0, 2.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 3.0, 1.0, 2.0, 1.0, 1.0]) candid = np.array([1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, 10.0]) fig = plt.figure() a2 = fig.add_subplot(111) a2.scatter(candid, candyn, color='red') a2.set_xlabel("Candidate Bulgeless Galaxy ID #") a2.set_ylabel("Classified as ...


0

you don't need to substract '1' from lengthCounter in ++wordsOfLength[lengthCounter - '1']; It should be ++wordsOfLength[lengthCounter];


0

This works for me (I get 15 bins): C=rand(300,600)*1e-20; % to have similar numbers as you have nbins = 15; hist(C(:),nbins); If you still have problems, try close all; clearvars; before executing the rest.


0

Indeed. To draw a histogram having arbitrary bins use: nbins=10; figure(); hist(data,nbins) However, if no second argument is given the standard of 10 bins is used. I suspect your vector contains all identical numbers therefore yielding only a single column. Could you verify this? Kind regards, Ernst Jan


0

If you give a single column to the stats command, the yrange is used to select the range from this column. At first sight this doesn't make sense, but behaves like a plot command which has only a single column, in which case this single column is the y-value and the row number is choosen as x-value. So, just move the set yrange part behind the stats ...


0

Based on tcaswell's comment (use step) I've developed my own answer. Notice that I need to add elements to both the x (one zero element at the beginning of the array) and y arrays (one zero element at the beginning and another at the end of the array) so that step will plot the vertical lines at the beginning and the end of the bars. Here's the code: ...


1

The step plot will generate the appearance that you want from a set of bins and the count (or normalized count) in those bins. Here I've used plt.hist to get the counts, then plot them, with the counts normalized. It's necessary to duplicate the first entry in order to get it to actually have a line there. (a,b,c) = plt.hist(x1, bins=bin_n, ...


6

You can set the line width with par(): opar <- par(lwd=2) plot(h) par(opar)


3

You can simply take care of it at render time without any transforms or recalculating. Simply treat d.x as y-position, d.dy as width instead of height. Swapping between x and y might seem inappropriate, but it's totally reasonable. There are even examples of radial charts drawn this way too, using the x values to derive the angle of the bar and the y value ...


1

If you don't know the underlaying distribution, maybe the function ksdensity (Statistics Toolbox required) is useful: x = [randn(3000,1); 15+randn(3000,1)]; figure; hist(x,40) [f,xi] = ksdensity(x); figure; plot(xi,f);


1

You have to normalize so that the total probabilities sum to one. Typically that means summing over the histogram or integrating if the function is continuous, then dividing.


0

This is probably because you called ggplot() without an argument (Not sure if that should be possible. If you think so, please add a issue on http://github.com/yhat/ggplot). Anyway, this should work: ggplot(df, aes(x='method', y='TP')) + geom_bar(stat='identity') Unfortunately, faceting with geom_bar doesn't work yet properly (only when all facets have ...


1

Some suggestions: change the size of the figure. Most of all pay attention to the ratio: if you have too many columns in a bar chart, it should have a wider ratio. change the orientation of the text. Rotating by 90 degrees makes it much more legible. I tried the following code, and it worked great: import matplotlib.pyplot as pl import numpy as np fig ...


0

If I understand your question correctly, the ranges are unknown and you must determine each dynamically. Find the min and max values as you have done. Using a cursor, calculate the upper and lower bounds for each range and save the results to a temporary table containing fields such as rangeLabel, lowerBound, upperBound. Select the temp table and look up the ...


0

SELECT CASE WHEN (max(numb) - min(numb) BETWEEN xx AND yy THEN zz WHEN (max(numb) - min(numb) BETWEEN zz AND aa THEN cc will handle your sizing of your bar chart and a GROUP BY in another query will give you the values in each distribution.


1

SELECT * FROM my_table; +----+-----+ | id | val | +----+-----+ | 1 | 19 | | 2 | 10 | | 3 | 6 | | 4 | 29 | | 6 | 27 | | 7 | 20 | | 8 | 11 | | 9 | 12 | | 13 | 16 | | 14 | 38 | | 15 | 8 | | 16 | 22 | | 17 | 23 | | 18 | 16 | | 19 | 20 | | 20 | 18 | | 28 | 18 | | 29 | 7 | | 30 | 10 | | 31 | 34 | | 32 | 11 | | 33 | 17 | | 34 | 15 ...


0

While I haven't found out exactly why the drawn histogram isn't updating, I've done some testing and now feel confident that the histograms are changing between different frames. Here's the code I've added to my previous program: //new declarations Mat last_hist; bool first = true; //code is the same, leading up to... normalize( v_hist, v_hist, 0, ...


0

My five cents. #include <iostream> #include <iomanip> int main() { std::cout << std::setfill( '*' ); while ( true ) { const unsigned int Base10 = 10; std::cout << "Enter non-negative number (0 - exit): "; unsigned int n = 0; std::cin >> n; if ( !n ) break; ...


0

Try this: void print(int num) { while (num > 0) { int digit = num%10; for (int i=0; i<digit; i++) printf("*"); printf("\n"); num /= 10; } } int main() { int num; scanf("%d",&num); print(num); return 0; }


1

Is it possible to handle this requirements with iOS7 standard API or do I need a 3rd party framework It's certainly possible to do it all yourself with no help from anybody except the frameworks that Apple provides. Whether that's the best solution for you, only you can decide. I think these are the relevant considerations: You seem to have some ...


3

OK. First of all, you should know exactly what a histogram is. It is not a plot of counts. It is a visualization for continuous variables that estimates the underlying probability density function. So do not try to use hist on categorical data. (That's why hist tells you that the value you pass must be numeric.) If you just want counts of discrete values, ...


0

You need to set the indexing initially. Elasticsearch is good at defaults but it is not possible for it to determine if the provided value is a timestamp, integer or string. So its your job to tell Elasticsearch about the same. Let me explain by example. Lets consider the following document is what you are trying to index: { "@version": "1", ...


4

Below is a function I implemented that acts as a bar3 replacement (partially). In my version, the bars are rendered by creating a patch graphics object: we build a matrix of vertex coordinates and a list of faces connecting those vertices. The idea is to first build a single "3d cube" as a template, then replicate it for as many bars as we have. Each bar ...


0

The histogram is correct. Assuming the full array you have provided is defined as "yax", import matplotlib.pyplot as plt; import numpy as np myarray = np.asarray(yax) plt.hist(myarray, bins=100, histtype='stepfilled') plt.xlabel("Bins") plt.ylabel("Frequency") plt.ylim(0,10) plt.show() # produces the exact histogram you provided at ...


1

proc sgplot data=have; histogram x / fillattrs=graphdata1 name='s' legendlabel='x' transparency=0.5 binstart=2.5 binwidth=5; histogram y / fillattrs=graphdata2 name='d' legendlabel='y' transparency=0.5 binstart=2.5 binwidth=5; keylegend 's' 'd' / location=inside position=topright across=1; ...


2

Solution using only functions available in OCTAVE, tested with octave-online This solution generates a surface in a similar way to the internals of Matlabs hist3d function. In brief: creates a surface with 4 points with the "height" of each value, which are plotted at each bin edge. Each is surrounded by zeros, which are also plotted at each bin edge. ...


2

I think the following should do the trick. I didn't use anything more sophisticated than colormap, surf and patch, which to my knowledge should all work as-is in Octave. The code: %# Your data Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; %# the "nominal" bar (adjusted from cylinder()) n = 4; r = [0.5; 0.5]; m = length(r); theta = (0:n)/n*2*pi + pi/4; sintheta = ...



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