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1

Minimum peak separation Specify the minimum peak distance, or minimum separation between peaks as a positive integer. You can use the 'MINPEAKDISTANCE' option to specify that the algorithm ignore small peaks that occur in the neighborhood of a larger peak. When you specify a value for 'MINPEAKDISTANCE', the algorithm initially identifies all the ...


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If you've got noisy data, you may find that instead of one solid peak, you get lots of small ones (see the folowing image). The important data here is when the signal is high and when it is low - you don't care about small variations in value, you only want to use one of those peaks and not look at all the smaller local ones around it. If you know the ...


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One alternative is to use text to insert labels into the plot: hist(Heiser$ZEB1[1:19], breaks=50, col="grey") text(Heiser$ZEB1, 2, labels= Heiser$CellLines, srt=90) Edit: Positioning labels in the same category one over another: Heiser_hist <- hist(Heiser$ZEB1[1:19], breaks=50, col="grey") Heiser$cut <- cut(Heiser$ZEB1, ...


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You are going to have a problem with overlapping labels (not sure what you want to do there) but hist(Heiser$ZEB1[1:19], breaks=50, col="grey", xaxt="n") axis(1,Heiser$ZEB1, Heiser$CellLines ) I think gives you what you're after based on the description. Are you sure you don't want a bar plot instead? Because with a histogram, one bar does not represent ...


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Here is from Opencv's reference on MatND class: // return pointer to the element (versions for 1D, 2D, 3D and generic nD cases) uchar* ptr(int i0); const uchar* ptr(int i0) const; uchar* ptr(int i0, int i1); const uchar* ptr(int i0, int i1) const; uchar* ptr(int i0, int i1, int i2); const uchar* ptr(int i0, int i1, int i2) const; ...


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According to the doc for geornd, you need to provide the function with a probability parameter P (here 1/5) and a vector dictating the size of the output you want, so it looks like your K is not used correctly in this context. If you want 1000 random values distributed according to geornd, you might want to use this instead: R = geornd(0.2,[1 1000]); % P ...


1

You generate 13 samples and plot 13 boxes at the sample place. Of course you don't see the transparency anymore. Change the first part of your plot command to draw a single box only: plot '+' using (ax+bw/2):($0 == 0 ? ay : 1/0) with boxes lc rgb "green"


2

One thing you can do is that you can do the calculation before you draw the graphic. But, if I follow your approach, you would want something like this. ggplot(df, aes(x=x)) + geom_bar(aes(y = N/sum(N)), stat="identity", width=1.0, colour = "dark green", fill = 'paleturquoise4') + ylab("y")


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This workaround might help: library(ggplot2) library(data.table) df <- data.table(x = var) df <- df[, .N, by=x] # Add 8-25 rows to your data in order to get displayed df <- rbind( df, data.frame(x=rep(8:25), N=0) ) p <- ggplot(df, aes(x=factor(x), y=N)) + geom_bar( stat="identity", width=1.0, colour = ...


2

The problem is that you are converting x to a factor in the aesthetics call. You can get around this by specifying the "levels" you want beforehand and making sure they don't get dropped (from this question): df$x <- factor(df$x, levels=c(0:25)) p <- ggplot(df, aes(x=x, y=N)) + geom_bar(stat="identity", width=1.0, colour = ...


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To increase the spacing between the xtics you must increase the canvas width when setting your terminal: set terminal wxt size 1000,500


1

As you are splitting your vector in two, you can create the groups by applying the inequality statements directly to the vector. To plot the table you can use barplot . set.seed(1) var <- sample(1:10, 100, T) (tab <- table(var<=2)) #FALSE TRUE # 87 13 barplot(tab) Or directly barplot(table(var<=2)) For more categories, the ...


2

You can do: ct <- cut(a, breaks = c(0, 2, max(a)), include.lowest=TRUE, labels=c("<=2", ">2")) ## [1] <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 >2 <=2 >2 >2 >2 <=2 >2 >2 <=2 ## [19] >2 >2 <=2 <=2 >2 >2 <=2 <=2 <=2 >2 <=2 >2 <=2 <=2 <=2 <=2 ...


0

Far from an elegant solution, but you can decrease the relative size of the border linewidth by making everything bigger (and vice versa), e.g. to halve the border linewidth, double the plot dimensions, the font sizes and all other linewidths.


0

Also try: plot( sort(x), (1:length(x))/length(x), type="l" )


3

It is possible to color both the bars and their borders independently. But for that you need to know how many of those you have ! Here is a proposition, when what you want to do is to single out the first bar on the right to a certain value (here 1.96): set.seed(123) x <- rnorm(100) res.hist <- hist(x, plot=FALSE) n_bars <- length(res.hist$mids) ...


0

You might find lmfit (http://lmfit.github.io/lmfit-py/) useful. This has a Skewed Gaussian model built in. Your problem might be as simple as from lmfit.models import SkewedGaussianModel xvals, yvals = read_your_histogram() model = SkewedGaussianModel() # set initial parameter values params = model.make_params(amplitude=10, center=0, sigma=1, gamma=0) ...


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First of all, I can recreate this. I think it goes down this branch in the code https://github.com/dcjones/Gadfly.jl/blob/040606f82c4e014611464068b0d5cda111b6662a/src/statistics.jl#L136-L143 isdiscrete = false value_set = collect(Set(values[Bool[Gadfly.isconcrete(v) for v in values]])) sort!(value_set) if length(value_set) / ...


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#include <stdio.h> #define print(VAR) (i<=VAR ? 'x' : ' ') int main(void){ int A=5, B=3, C=1, D=0; int MAX = 5;//int MAX=0;scanf("%d", &A); if(A>MAX) MAX=A;... int i; for(i=MAX;i>0;i--) printf("%c%c%c%c\n", print(A), print(B), print(C), print(D)); printf("ABCD\n"); return 0; }


0

A dynamic graph would also help in this plot. Use the manipulate package from Rstudio to do a dynamic ranged histogram: library(manipulate) data_distribution <- table(data) manipulate(barplot(data_dist[x:y]), x = slider(1,length(data_dist)), y = slider(10, length(data_dist))) Then you will be able to use sliders to see the particular distribution in a ...


1

The below is for proc univariate rather than proc capability, I do not have access to SAS/QC to test, but the user guide shows very similar syntax for the histogram statements. Hopefully, you'll be able to translate it back. It looks like you are having problems with the colour due to your output system. Your graphs are probably delivered via ODS, in which ...


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try this: int main() { int i,a[6],j,c=0,t; for (i=0;i<6;i++) scanf("%d",&a[i]); for(i=0;i<5;i++) // sort the array { for(j=i+1;j<6;j++) { if(a[i]>a[j]) { t=a[j]; a[j]=a[i]; a[i]=t; } } } ...


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#include <stdio.h> int main() { int i,array[6]={0},a[6],j,c=0,t; for (i=0;i<6;i++) scanf("%d",&a[i]); for(j=0;j<6;j++) { if(array[j])continue; t=a[j]; for(i=0;i<6;i++) { if (a[i]==t) { c=c+1; array[i]++;} } printf("The number %d ...


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I think EMD is good solution to resolve cross-bin problem compares with bin to bin method. However, as some mentions, EMD is very long time. Could you suggest to me some other approach for cross-bin?


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This can be done by simply using the bins centres from one call to hist as the bins for the another for example [aCounts,aBins] = hist(a,nBins); [bCounts,bBins] = hist(b,aBins); note that all(aBins==bBins) = 1 This method however will loose information when the min and max values of the two data sets are not similar*, one simple solution is to create ...


0

The behavior of hist is different when the 2nd argument is a vector instead of a scalar. Instead of specifying a number of bins, specify the bin limits using a vector, as demonstrated in the documentation (see "Specify Bin Intervals"): rng(0,'twister') data1 = randn(1000,1)*10; rng(1,'twister') data2 = randn(1000,1); figure xvalues1 = -40:40; [c,d] = ...


1

As far as I know, there is no cutting/breaking function in base R that allows you to specify such irregular breaks like that. You could wrap findInterval to do some of the manupulations findInterval2 <- function(x, br, rightmost.closed = FALSE, left.closed=TRUE, trim=FALSE, labels=NULL) { r <- findInterval(x, br, rightmost.closed) ...


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The comments above explain what's happening - the breaks are the left and right limits of the intervals, not the centers. How to fix it? If you are dealing just with numbers discretized to [natural numbers] * 0.1 you can set your breaks at 0.05, 0.15, ... by data <- c(-0.5, -0.5, 0.4) breaks <- ((min(data)*10):(max(data)*10+1))/10-0.05 result <- ...


4

geom_histogram() uses stat_bin() to divide your data in bins. Default value for stat_bin() is right=FALSE that means that class start with value including and end with value not including this value, for example, class 0.9-1 will include 0.9 but won't include 1. To change this to oposite direction just add right=TRUE to geom_histogram(). ...


0

You're right, it is due to the domain; the reason it works in Mike's example is that the domain minimum he uses is 0. A better approach would be to do the following, replace every occurrence of x(data[0].dx) - 1 with x(60 + data[0].dx) - 1 More, generally, you can define your x scale with: var x = d3.scale.linear() .domain(d3.extent(data)) ...


1

The normal way to do this is to find your darkest pixel, and your brightest. You can do this in a singe loop iterating over all your pixels, pseudo-code like this: darkest=pixel[0,0] // assume first pixel is darkest for now, and overwrite later brightest=pixel[0,0] // assume first pixel is lightest for now, and overwrite later for all pixels if this ...


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You want the orientation kwarg of hist (Docs). import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np fig, ax = plt.subplots() data = np.random.randn(1500) bins = np.linspace(-5, 5, 25, endpoint=True) ax.hist(data, bins, orientation='horizontal') ax.set_ylim([-5, 5]) plt.show()


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The isalpha() is the best place to start to filter out non-alpha char. Use #define READ (UCHAR_MAX + 1) while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) { if (isalpha(c) { c = tolower(c); length[c]++; } } To deal with printing the histogram, use the return value from printf() as it reports the number of char printed to calcualte the offset. ...


0

Not 100% sure what you are looking for, but perhaps: #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <ctype.h> int main ( void ) { int c; int i; int x; int n; int count[26]; int N = (sizeof(count)/sizeof(count[0])); for(x = 0; x < N; x++) count[x] = 0; while ((c = getchar() ) != EOF) { ...


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CFIOMultimap apparently is an implementation of a multimap. However, as of the time of writing I couldn't get it to work. It returns nils all the time when I subscript. Perhaps it can be fixed and adapted for your use.


3

The cause of error is because your image is RGB and imhist does not deal with that. To work around this you can either use a single channel: imhist(YourImage(:,:,Channel)); or convert from RGB to grayscale: imhist(rgb2gray(YourImage)); That should work fine now.


1

Can't comment on your code, but it seems to work. Note that the chi-square goodness-of-fit test is designed to work on counts of data falling within each bin. You cannot use it on normalized values, or with any other scaling, in fact. So whatever you show, the chi-square has to be based on the actual counts.


1

The way you're computing the width of the bars is incorrect for your particular use case; in particular it results in negative widths (as the error message indicates). You need to take the width of the range and divide it by the number of items (minus a small number if you want gaps): .attr("width", (x.range()[1] - x.range()[0]) / data.length - 2) ...


0

This is what I do: bp<-barplot(data.norm, beside=TRUE, col=c("grey10","grey20","grey30","grey40","grey50","grey60","grey70","grey80","grey90","grey80","grey70","grey60",))text(bp, par("usr")[3], labels=my.names, srt=45, pos=2, xpd=TRUE,offset=0.01) It is working fine for my purpose.Hope this helps to the others Regards


0

SELECT grade, COUNT(*) AS 'Count', RPAD('', COUNT(*), '*') AS 'Bar' FROM grades GROUP BY grade grade Count Bar 1 2 ** 2 1 * 3 1 * 4 1 * 5 1 * From Shlomo Priymak at http://blog.shlomoid.com/2011/08/how-to-quickly-create-histogram-in.html


2

Looking at the code for histogramdd it simply uses the parameter bins=10 from the function definition when it's not given. From your link: def histogramdd(sample, bins=10, range=None, normed=False, weights=None):


1

If you doing histogram equalization you need to first color convert it to a color space with a luminance channel, like Lab, HSV or YCrCb and then only equalize the luminance. If you try equalizing the RGB channels you will get weird color shifts.


3

How about: x <- c(5,2) table(cut(x = x, breaks = c(-Inf, -1, 0, 1.5, Inf))) This would work too: maxval <- 1.1*max(abs(x)) hist(x = c(.5,2), breaks = c(-maxval, -1, 0, 1.5, maxval), plot=FALSE)$counts This is the original (perfectly sensible) suggestion: hist(x = c(.5,2), breaks = c(-Inf, -1, 0, 1.5, Inf), ...


1

The main problem of your code is after rgb2hsv(), the format of each pixel is double in [0,1], rather than uint8. So you need to convert back to [0,255] so it can be used as a subscript. The following code will work properly. for i=1:size(GIm,1) for j=1:size(GIm,2) value=floor(GIm(i,j) * 255); % now value is in [0,255] ...


1

I think this is what you are looking for: # Category names my.names <- c("test1","test2","test3") # Example data data <- runif(length(my.names)) # Normalize the example data as a percentage of the total data.norm <- data / sum(data) # Use barplot to plot the results, plot without an x axis x <- barplot(data.norm,names.arg=my.names,xaxt="n") ...


1

$_ is the current element of @list The code can be rewritten as follows: # Enumerate all values in the input list foreach my $value (@list) { # Compute histogram bin into which to place the current value my $bin_index = ceil(($value + 1) / $bin_width) - 1; # Increment the number of values in the bin $histogram{$bin_index}++; }


0

$_ is the current context value. In this case, the current iteration element of your for @list loop. The hash contains the number of occurrences for each "bin". The bin is calculated using the ceil function and a $bin_width, and it serves as the key for the hash (the value is the occurrence counter that gets accumulated into). The ++ increments the ...


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$_ here is used as implicit foreach variable; same thing could be explicitly written as my %histogram; for my $n (@list) { my $key = ceil(($n + 1) / $bin_width) -1; $histogram{$key} += 1; }


1

It is a postfix for loop. Your attempt to print $_ is probably failing because you are putting it outside the loop (but you didn't share your code for that attempt). It could be rewritten as: my %histogram; for my $value (@list) { $histogram{ceil(($value + 1) / $bin_width) -1}++ }



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