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5

You can set the line width with par(): opar <- par(lwd=2) plot(h) par(opar)


0

Yes, you can do this with excel. You can import the file as a tab-separated file and have excel generate diagrams for you.


3

You can simply take care of it at render time without any transforms or recalculating. Simply treat d.x as y-position, d.dy as width instead of height. Swapping between x and y might seem inappropriate, but it's totally reasonable. There are even examples of radial charts drawn this way too, using the x values to derive the angle of the bar and the y value ...


1

If you don't know the underlaying distribution, maybe the function ksdensity (Statistics Toolbox required) is useful: x = [randn(3000,1); 15+randn(3000,1)]; figure; hist(x,40) [f,xi] = ksdensity(x); figure; plot(xi,f);


1

You have to normalize so that the total probabilities sum to one. Typically that means summing over the histogram or integrating if the function is continuous, then dividing.


0

This is probably because you called ggplot() without an argument (Not sure if that should be possible. If you think so, please add a issue on http://github.com/yhat/ggplot). Anyway, this should work: ggplot(df, aes(x='method', y='TP')) + geom_bar(stat='identity') Unfortunately, faceting with geom_bar doesn't work yet properly (only when all facets have ...


1

Some suggestions: change the size of the figure. Most of all pay attention to the ratio: if you have too many columns in a bar chart, it should have a wider ratio. change the orientation of the text. Rotating by 90 degrees makes it much more legible. I tried the following code, and it worked great: import matplotlib.pyplot as pl import numpy as np fig ...


0

If I understand your question correctly, the ranges are unknown and you must determine each dynamically. Find the min and max values as you have done. Using a cursor, calculate the upper and lower bounds for each range and save the results to a temporary table containing fields such as rangeLabel, lowerBound, upperBound. Select the temp table and look up the ...


0

SELECT CASE WHEN (max(numb) - min(numb) BETWEEN xx AND yy THEN zz WHEN (max(numb) - min(numb) BETWEEN zz AND aa THEN cc will handle your sizing of your bar chart and a GROUP BY in another query will give you the values in each distribution.


1

SELECT * FROM my_table; +----+-----+ | id | val | +----+-----+ | 1 | 19 | | 2 | 10 | | 3 | 6 | | 4 | 29 | | 6 | 27 | | 7 | 20 | | 8 | 11 | | 9 | 12 | | 13 | 16 | | 14 | 38 | | 15 | 8 | | 16 | 22 | | 17 | 23 | | 18 | 16 | | 19 | 20 | | 20 | 18 | | 28 | 18 | | 29 | 7 | | 30 | 10 | | 31 | 34 | | 32 | 11 | | 33 | 17 | | 34 | 15 ...


0

While I haven't found out exactly why the drawn histogram isn't updating, I've done some testing and now feel confident that the histograms are changing between different frames. Here's the code I've added to my previous program: //new declarations Mat last_hist; bool first = true; //code is the same, leading up to... normalize( v_hist, v_hist, 0, ...


0

My five cents. #include <iostream> #include <iomanip> int main() { std::cout << std::setfill( '*' ); while ( true ) { const unsigned int Base10 = 10; std::cout << "Enter non-negative number (0 - exit): "; unsigned int n = 0; std::cin >> n; if ( !n ) break; ...


0

Try this: void print(int num) { while (num > 0) { int digit = num%10; for (int i=0; i<digit; i++) printf("*"); printf("\n"); num /= 10; } } int main() { int num; scanf("%d",&num); print(num); return 0; }


0

Is it possible to handle this requirements with iOS7 standard API or do I need a 3rd party framework It's certainly possible to do it all yourself with no help from anybody except the frameworks that Apple provides. Whether that's the best solution for you, only you can decide. I think these are the relevant considerations: You seem to have some ...


3

OK. First of all, you should know exactly what a histogram is. It is not a plot of counts. It is a visualization for continuous variables that estimates the underlying probability density function. So do not try to use hist on categorical data. (That's why hist tells you that the value you pass must be numeric.) If you just want counts of discrete values, ...


0

You need to set the indexing initially. Elasticsearch is good at defaults but it is not possible for it to determine if the provided value is a timestamp, integer or string. So its your job to tell Elasticsearch about the same. Let me explain by example. Lets consider the following document is what you are trying to index: { "@version": "1", ...


4

Below is a function I implemented that acts as a bar3 replacement (partially). In my version, the bars are rendered by creating a patch graphics object: we build a matrix of vertex coordinates and a list of faces connecting those vertices. The idea is to first build a single "3d cube" as a template, then replicate it for as many bars as we have. Each bar ...


0

The histogram is correct. Assuming the full array you have provided is defined as "yax", import matplotlib.pyplot as plt; import numpy as np myarray = np.asarray(yax) plt.hist(myarray, bins=100, histtype='stepfilled') plt.xlabel("Bins") plt.ylabel("Frequency") plt.ylim(0,10) plt.show() # produces the exact histogram you provided at ...


1

proc sgplot data=have; histogram x / fillattrs=graphdata1 name='s' legendlabel='x' transparency=0.5 binstart=2.5 binwidth=5; histogram y / fillattrs=graphdata2 name='d' legendlabel='y' transparency=0.5 binstart=2.5 binwidth=5; keylegend 's' 'd' / location=inside position=topright across=1; ...


1

Solution using only functions available in OCTAVE, tested with octave-online This solution generates a surface in a similar way to the internals of Matlabs hist3d function. In brief: creates a surface with 4 points with the "height" of each value, which are plotted at each bin edge. Each is surrounded by zeros, which are also plotted at each bin edge. ...


2

I think the following should do the trick. I didn't use anything more sophisticated than colormap, surf and patch, which to my knowledge should all work as-is in Octave. The code: %# Your data Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; %# the "nominal" bar (adjusted from cylinder()) n = 4; r = [0.5; 0.5]; m = length(r); theta = (0:n)/n*2*pi + pi/4; sintheta = ...


3

I don't have access to Octave, butI believe this should do the trick: Z = [2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; [H W] = size(Z); h = zeros( 1, numel(Z) ); ih = 1; for ix = 1:W fx = ix-.45; tx = ix+.45; for iy = 1:W fy = iy-.45; ty = iy+.45; vert = [ fx fy 0;... fx ty 0;... tx fy 0;... ...


2

Have you looked at this toturial on bar3? Adapting it slightly: Z=[2 3 4 8 4 10 5 6 7]; % input data figure; h = bar3(Z); % get handle to graphics for k=1:numel(h), z=get(h(k),'ZData'); % old data - need for its NaN pattern nn = isnan(z); nz = kron( Z(:,k),ones(6,4) ); % map color to height 6 faces per data point nz(nn) = NaN; % ...


0

A very similar preparation of values as in @om-nom-nom 's answer, yet the histogram method quite small by using partition, case class Distribution(nBins: Int, data: List[Double]) { require(data.length > nBins) val Epsilon = 0.000001 val (max,min) = (data.max,data.min) val binWidth = (max - min) / nBins + Epsilon val bounds = (1 to nBins).map { ...


1

How about this? object Hist { type Bins = Map[Double, List[Double]] // artificially increasing bucket length to overcome last-point issue private val Epsilon = 0.000001 def histogram(data: List[Double], binsCount: Int) = { require(data.length > binsCount) val sorted = data.sorted val min = sorted.head ...


0

Get some numbers: scala> val a = Array.tabulate(100){ _ => scala.util.Random.nextDouble * 10 } a: Array[Double] = Array(6.333702962141718, 1.5506921990476974, 5.275795179538175, 1.7422259222209069, 2.8613172268857423, 9.489321343162988, 0.06102866084230496, 2.83927696305669... Use groupBy to group elements into five bins of "size" two. scala> ...


1

The lines are the median (solid line) and the interquartile range (dotted lines). The histograms just illustrate the frequencies of the sample values.


1

Here is a solution, employing the group_by functionality found in the link below: http://pastebin.com/c5WLWPbp import numpy as np dates = np.arange('2004-02', '2005-05', dtype='datetime64[D]') np.random.shuffle(dates) values = np.random.randint(40,200, len(dates)) years = np.array(dates, dtype='datetime64[Y]') months = np.array(dates, ...


1

In order to do this, there is a function in numpy, numpy.bincount. It is blazingly fast. It is so fast that you can create a bin for each integer (161 bins) and day (maybe 30000 different days?) resulting in a few million bins. The procedure: calculate an integer index for each bin (e.g. 17 x number of day from the first day in the file + (integer - ...


2

First, fill in your 16 bins without considering date at all. Then, sort the elements within each bin by date. Now, you can use binary search to efficiently locate a given year/month/week within each bin.


0

If you look at histfit code, you'll see it calls fitdist to fit the distribution. So, you can get the parameters (mu and sigma) of the fitted distribution by pd = fitdist(r,'normal'); mu = pd.mu; sigma = pd.sigma; To obtain values of this pdf, say at points, x, use y = normpdf(x,mu,sigma);


1

To avoid guessing the amplitude, call hist() with normed=True, then the amplitude corresponds to normpdf(). For doing a curve fit, I suggest to use not the density but the cumulative distribution: Each sample has a height of 1/N, which successively sum up to 1. This has the advantage that you don't need to group samples in bins. import numpy as np from ...


2

Assuming these are your data, you can display the frequencies using barplot. x <- c(1, 2, 21, 12, 0) names(x) <- c("1-3", "4-6", "7-10", "11-14", ">14") x # 1-3 4-6 7-10 11-14 >14 # 1 2 21 12 0 barplot(x) See also the documentation for function hist.


1

So, your initial code would look like this from matplotlib import pyplot as plt import numpy as np # Produce a number of points in x-y from 1 distribution. mean = [3,4] cov = [[3,1],[1,3]] x,y = np.random.multivariate_normal(mean,cov,1000).T plt.plot(x,y,'x'); plt.axis('equal'); plt.show() Z = np.array([x,y]) # Produce 2D histogram projection ...


1

You can simply set the interpolation method that imshow uses: plt.imshow(H, interpolation = 'none') Here's an example showing different interpolation methods, and the docs list all implemented methods.


0

hist3 should be able to accomplish this for you. I'm not quite sure where the problem is. You can call hist3 like so: [N,C] = hist3(X); This will automatically partition your dataset into a 10 x 10 grid of equally spaced containers. You can override this behaviour by doing: [N,C] = hist3(X, NBINS); NBINS is a 2 element Ć’array where the first element ...


1

I think the simplest way would be to use a multiline title, optionally along with TeX formatting to de-emphasise the additional info. To make a multiline title, pass a cell array of strings like this: title({'\fontsize{16}Actual Title';'\fontsize{8}other info'}) Being consistent across the histograms, I think this would look tidier than having text on the ...


1

Is this more or less what you're asking for? library(ggplot2) library(scales) p11_age <- ggplot(Age_2011, aes(x=Age))+ geom_histogram(aes(y=..count../sum(..count..)), binwidth=1, origin=-0.5, fill=NA, color="black")+ scale_y_continuous(name="Frequency (%)", labels=percent_format())+ scale_x_continuous(name="Age ...


0

Though this is an old post, we can also use accumarray: h = accumarray(im(:)+1, 1, [intmax(class(im))+1 1]); h will contain a histogram / frequency count of how many pixels are encountered per intensity level. We take all of the values in im and offset by 1 as MATLAB indexes arrays starting from 1 instead of 0. The intensities for an image will start at ...


1

The filledcurves plotting style doesn't support color gradients, see Gnuplot filledcurves with palette. Since you have the same height for every bar, you can use the boxes plotting style: set style fill solid noborder plot 'data.dat' using 1:2:3 with boxes lc palette


1

This is a very good question actually! I was bothered by this all the time but finally your question has kicked me to finally solve it :-) Well, in this case we cannot simply do hist(x, xlim = c(100, 500), breaks = 9), as the breaks refer to the whole range of x, not related to xlim (in other words, xlim is used only for plotting, not for computing the ...


1

As usual, Gnuplot is a fantastic tool for plotting sweet looking graphs and it can be made to perform all sorts of calculations. However, it is intended to plot data rather than to serve as a calculator and it is often easier to use an external programme (e.g. Octave) to do the more "complicated" calculations, save this data in a file, then use Gnuplot to ...


1

The matplotlib hist is actually just making calls to some other functions. It is often easier to use these directly allowing you to inspect the data and modify it directly: # Generate some data data = np.random.normal(size=1000) # Generate the histogram data directly hist, bin_edges = np.histogram(data, bins=10) # Get the reversed cumulative sum ...


1

You can use RawTurtle (see this topic for details). So, define raw_turtle in your code: canvas = tkinter.Canvas(frame1, width=450, height=450) raw_turtle = turtle.RawTurtle(canvas) and use it for histogram. Full code will look like this: from tkinter import * import tkinter.messagebox import urllib.request import turtle def main(): counts = ...


0

It looks like it will be supported in Kibana4, but there doesn't seem to be much more info out there than that. For reference: https://github.com/elasticsearch/kibana/issues/1249


0

hist(...) uses right-closed intervals by default. You can change this using the right=... argument. x <- c(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8) y <- c(85, 7, 3, 4, 6, 1, 2, 1) z <- rep(x,times=y) par(mfrow=c(1,2)) hist(z,right=T, main="Right closed") hist(z,right=F, main="Left Closed") Here's the equivalent in ggplot, which IMO is a bit ...


4

Regarding question 1: This is not what we observe, the drop is in all three panels at around 10^7 bins. What is happening here? Some complicated caching effect? Or is it something obvious that we missed? This drop is due to the limit you've set on the maximum number of blocks (1<<14 == 16384). At n=10^7 gpuBench2 the limit has kicked in, and each ...


0

How about using a log scale? A quick google search shows this page as a way to do that in Excel: http://tushar-mehta.com/excel/newsgroups/flexible_log_scale/help.html


0

I found a way to cheat on it. I say "cheat", because it actually plot negative and positive parts of the data separately. Thus you can not compare the negative and positive data. But only can show the distribution of negative and positive parts separately. And one of the problem is if there is zero values in your data, it will not be shown in the plot. ...


0

You want to use histc. [binCounts, idx] = histc(x, y); Then to find the bin in which a certain value of x is: bin = idx(x == 0.4); Just watch out since histc second input is not the centers like hist, but the end value of each bin. So you might need to change your y vector.



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