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0

You can plot exactly as much of the histogram as you want by choosing a subsection of the matrix, bins = 100 xmin = 40 xmax = 60 [f,x]=hist(randn(1000000,1),bins); bar(x(xmin:xmax),f(xmin:xmax)) Alternatively, you can plot over a specified range of x bin values, xvalues = -1:0.1:0.9; [f,x]=hist(randn(1000000,1),xvalues); bar(x,f,'b') but all the ...


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You can use gca to get the current axes of the image, and then modify the labels using the XTickLabel field. Alternatively you can use XTick to set the labels given a matrix of numbers. For example ax = gca ax.XTick = 1:n; Will create n labels on the image ranging from 1 to n. The same thing can be done for the y-axis using YTick and YTickLabel. The ...


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df <- data.frame(USER.ID=c(3,7,9,13,16,26,49,50,51,52,69,75,91,98,138,139,149,155,167,170,171,175,176,177,178,180,183,184,210,215,220,223), ...


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Took me some time to figure it out but the following format works for me for searching entries between specific times (2015 May 27 11am to 1130am to be exact)- @timestamp:[1432704600000 TO 1432706400000] Kibana requires timestamp in milliseconds from epoch format.


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Using a histogram is one solution but it involves bining the data. This is not necessary for plotting a CDF of empirical data. Let F(x) be the count of how many entries are less than x then it goes up by one, exactly where we see a measurement. Thus, if we sort our samples then at each point we incrememnt the count by one (or the fraction by 1/N) and plot ...


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lines(density(rnorm(1000,mean=mean(f),sd = sd(f))),col=1,lwd=3)


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See what hist function does using str: hs=hist(tails.Z, breaks=1000) str(hs) tail(cbind(hs$mids,hs$counts),20) barplot(hs$counts) summary(hs$counts)


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Note, that set style data histograms is ignored, because you overwrite it with the with boxes, and boxes and histograms are different ways to plot bar charts from the view point of grouping and arranging the data. If you can plot the first group with plot "t.dat" using 0:1 every ::0::39 with boxes then you can plot the second group with plot "t.dat" ...


1

You could use numpy.histogram's weights. Starting with your original data orig = [(1,100), (2,150), (1,300)] Split it like this: keys = [key for (key, _) in orig] weights = [weight for (_, weight) in orig] Then run import numpy as np np.histogram(keys, bins=bins, weights=weights)


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CV_COMP_INTERSECT is fast to compute since you just need the minimum value for each bin. But it will not tell you much about the distribution of the differences. Other methods try to achieve better and more continuous score as a match, under different assumptions about the pixel distribution. You can find the formulae used in different methods, at ...


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You can use getStat() method of H1D histograms of the DataMelt statistical program. Or you can use chi2 comparison using compareChi2(h1) method of H1D histogram (look at the jhplot package)


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If you are using pyplot, matplotlib.pyplot is stateful, in that it keeps track of the current figure and plotting area, and the plotting functions are directed to the current axes (from the beginners tutorial). That means that each time you create a subplot, it will become the current axis. So: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt data = [[1,2,3,4,5], ...


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Always look up the matplotlib gallery. Chances are you can find the plot type you need, and the code you can use. Eg. Here's a histogram demo, and how to stack 4 plots into one


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A complete (but not reproducible/testable) solution based on the comments above, with some attempt to reproduce the ggplot style ... opar <- options(scipen=100) par(bg="gray") ## set plot background color hist(df$FutureCost, main="Multicare Distribution of charges", xlab="Charge($)", breaks="FD", xlim=c(0,500000),col="black") ...


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I had a similar issue plotting a dataframe I derived using a query. I found that if after deriving the frame I used the reset_index() function on the derived frame it resolved the issue.


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For simple way, try this : im = imread('E:\S1\New\Image1.png'); Test =im(:,:,1); ir=histeq(ir); figure; imshow(ir, 'Border', 'tight');


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By default, geom_histogram() will use frequency rather than density on the y-axis. However, you can change this by setting your y aesthetic to ..density.. like so: ggplot(foo, aes(x = v, y = ..density.., weight = w)) + geom_histogram() This will produce a weighted histogram of v with density on the y-axis. You can also do this with the freq argument in ...


2

smooth frequency renders the data monotonic in x (i.e. the value given in the first using column, in your case the numerical value from column 6), and then sums up all y-values (the values given in the second using column). Here you also give the the sixth column, which is wrong if you want to count the number of occurrences of each distinct value in the ...


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numpy.histogram works only with numbers. When dt_array is your array of datetime objects, this would give you the histogram: to_timestamp = np.vectorize(lambda x: x.timestamp()) time_stamps = to_timestamp(dt_array) np.histogram(time_stamps)


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EDIT after comment. Better? ggplot()+ geom_histogram(aes(x=x), binwidth = 0.05, color = "grey30", fill = "white")+ coord_cartesian(xlim = c(0, 0.405)) + theme_tufte() + labs(y = "Frequency") + annotate("text", x = 0.4, xend = 0.4, y = 0.01, yend = .99, colour = "red", label = "//", size =6)


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Numpy has a handy function for dealing with this: np.clip. Basically, it does Artem's "dirty hack" inline. You can leave the values as they are, but in the hist call, just wrap the array in an np.clip call, like so plt.hist(np.clip(values_A, bins[0], bins[-1]), bins=bins) This is nicer because you do it right where it's needed, which reduces the chance ...


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First problem: you need the 'visible' property of the figure object. ... fitobject = fit(centers',counts','gauss2'); hold on; figure('visible','off') plot(fitobject ,centers',counts'); hold off; ... Second problem: using the plot function with fit-objects calls actually a different plot (cfit) function, which is part of the the Curve Fitting Toolbox. ...


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I think I found a solution: $ curl -XGET 'http://localhost:9200/localhost.localdomain/SET_APPS/_search?pretty=true' -d' { "aggregations" : { "time_hist" : { "histogram" : { "field" : "time", "interval" : 10125000, "order" : { "_count" : "asc" }, "min_doc_count" : 0, ...


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Use im2double instead of double if you want to use imhist. The imhist function expects double or single-precision data to be in the [0,1] data range, which is why you see everything in the last bin of the histogram.


3

I usually use stopifnot() for this, so that you check the simplest condition first then proceed to the more complex; you don't want to test all of them at once if the first one is invalid: stopifnot(is.numeric(x)) stopifnot(is.factor(y)) stopifnot(length(x) == length(y)) Alternatively, doing all of this in one go: if(!(is.numeric(x) && ...


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As Backlin commented above, you can use the par() function and mfrow option to control subplots: par(mfrow=c(2,2)) hist(iris$Sepal.Width) hist(iris$Sepal.Length) hist(iris$Petal.Width) hist(iris$Petal.Length)


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thanks for your answer. Preliminary I think I have made a mistake when pasting my code, I forgot to change the line you're noticed, this line should be the last one you wrote. Actual answer Your technique works very well, I do have extrem values for my pixels (clear white and dark black), regardless of the selected area. The only problem (I did not mention ...


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If you have the Computer Vision Toolbox, check out the insertShape Method. It allows you to easily draw shapes onto an image.


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Without using numpy.histogram, you can try: test = {1092267: '0.187', 524292: '-0.350', 524293: '0.029', 524294: '0.216'} intervals = [(-2, 0.1), (0.1, 0.2), (0.2, 0.3), (0.3, 0.4)] count = [] for inf, sup in intervals: count.append(len([x for x in test.values() if inf < float(x) < sup])) Then, count, which is the histogram, will have [2, 1, ...


2

You can use numpy.histogram to create the histogram's bins. First of all, get the absolute values of all the dictionary's values (since ids are irrelevant). dict_values = [abs(float(i)) for i in dict.values()] Then, use numpy.histogram specifying the range of the values explicitly. import numpy as np hist = np.histogram(dict_values, range=(0.0,1.0))


2

I agree with @Stibu that you want the CDF. When you are talking about a set of realized data, we refer to this as the empirical cumulative distribution function (ECDF). In R, the basic function call for this is ?ecdf: CF <- read.table(text="[1,] 2275.351 [2,] 2269.562 [3,] 1925.700 [4,] 1904.195 [5,] 1974.039", header=F) CF <- ...


5

What you probably want is the cumulative distribution function (CDF). It has probability on the y-axis (not x, as you asked), but since this is the standard way to represent the information that you want, it is best to use this curve. As an example, I produced 10'000 values with a standard normal distribution and then constructed the CDF: CF <- ...


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The bars to stay in the chart area. R calculates the axis dimensions based on your data and with default parameters even extends it a bit. The axis with its labels is drawn for the boxplot only inside the label range. If you draw a box around the figure, you will see that the plot uses up the space always the same disregarding of your data. So it is not ...


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You probably want to use numpy to generate a Gaussian, and then simply plot it on the same axes. There is a good example here: Fitting a Gaussian to a histogram with MatPlotLib and Numpy - wrong Y-scaling? If you actually want to automatically generate a fitted gaussian from the data, you probably need to use scipy curve_fit or leastsq functions to fit ...


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Add amount and outcome1 to the for loop and clear output after each sum: for j in range (15): for i in range(10): output.append(probability(prob, outcome)) amount = sum(output) outcome1.append(amount) output = [] print(outcome1)


1

You can do this by first disabling the axis in your hist call, then by adding in the axis again with the help of axTicks. # generate some data x <- rchisq(1000000,df=1) # create histogram x.hist <- hist(x,breaks=7,axes=FALSE) # create new axis # draw axis along 'y' axTicks(2) gets the values along 'x' from your plot axis(2, at=axTicks(2), ...


1

The warning is happening because the image size of or.tif is bigger than your screen. It's simply telling you that it is not displaying it at full size. This won't affect histogram equalisation. The Error with the histogram equalisation is because matlab expects I to be a 2D matrix. Your TIFF file is a 3D matrix, it has width x height x colour. Depending ...


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Preliminary: Did you notice you are not using at all your second version of the cumulative histogram function? void equalizeHist_16U(Mat* img, int x1, int x2, int y1, int y2) is calling compute_hist_16U(img, hist, true); and not: long compute_hist_16U (Mat* img, long* hist, bool cumul, int x1, int x2, int y1, int y2) (I suppose you wanted to post ...


3

Summarizing all comments, this is what I wanted to have. Thanks @Alex A. set.seed(1) mydata <- data.frame(y = runif (100, min= 0, max = 1), x = rpois(100, 15) * 10) a <- aggregate(mydata$y, by=list(bin=cut(mydata$x, nclass.Sturges(mydata$x))), FUN=sum) a$bin<- gsub (']','',as.character (a$bin)) a$bin<- gsub (',',' ',as.character (a$bin)) ...


3

This is one way to solve this problem that leverages the hist() function for most of the heavy lifting, and has the advantage that the barplot of the cumulative sum of y matches the bins and dimensions of the histogram of x: set.seed(1) mydata <- data.frame(y = runif (100, min= 0, max = 1), x = rpois(100, 15) * 10) mx <- mydata$x my <- mydata$y h ...


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Adding to @Konrad's answer, instead of using hist you can use one of the nclass.* functions directly (see the nclass documentation). There are three functions that are used by hist: nclass.Sturges uses Sturges' formula, implicitly basing bin sizes on the range of the data. nclass.scott uses Scott's choice for a normal distribution based on the ...


1

If you use the code you will see how the R decided to break up your data: data(mtcars) histinfo <- hist(mtcars$mpg) From the histinfo you will get the necessary information concerning the breaks. $breaks [1] 10 15 20 25 30 35 $counts [1] 6 12 8 2 4 $density [1] 0.0375 0.0750 0.0500 0.0125 0.0250 $mids [1] 12.5 17.5 22.5 27.5 32.5 $xname [1] ...


1

package com.test; import java.util.Vector; public class VectorDemo { public static void main(String[] args) { // create an empty Vector vec with an initial capacity of 4 Vector<Integer> vec = new Vector<Integer>(4); // use add() method to add elements in the vector vec.add(0,4); vec.add(1,3); vec.add(2,2); ...


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import java.io.File; import weka.core.Attribute; import weka.core.FastVector; import weka.core.Instance; import weka.core.Instances; import weka.core.converters.ArffSaver; import weka.filters.Filter; import weka.filters.unsupervised.instance.NonSparseToSparse; import java.awt.image.BufferedImage; import java.io.File; import java.io.IOException; import ...


3

It sounds like you just want to make sure that your x-axis values are numeric rather than factors ggplot(data=d1, aes(x=as.numeric(as.character(d.test)), y=Freq)) + geom_bar(stat="identity", width=.5) + geom_vline(xintercept=mean.score, color="blue", linetype="dashed") + scale_x_continuous(breaks=-2:3) which gives


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I found a way to do this with boxes, though I do not consider it very clean: plot 'histogram_data' u (column(0)*2+1):2 w boxes notitle lc rgb 'white',\ 'histogram_data' u (column(0)*2):2:(rgb($3,$4,$5)):xticlabels(1) w boxes notitle lc rgb variable; This command is plotting all the data of the main plot on even slots and a white box on odd slots. So ...


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Hi again thank you for your warnings @MikaelOhlson i did update my question, and i found how i can fix it. here, the right codes; but here little explation, Graph's type is BarChart and, and i created each column like that; XYChartSeries Sutun = new XYChartSeries; VBox paneforcolorbutton = new VBox(); paneforcolorbutton.setPadding(new Insets(20 ,20 ...


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The simplest way is to use paste to merge the two files (assuming, that the x-values are the same and in the same order in both files), and do the calculations in gnuplot. Consider the two test files A.txt 1 5 1 2 1 2 and B.txt: 1 3 1 2 4 1 Using the script set style fill solid noborder set boxwidth 0.8 relative set yrange [0:*] weighted_avg(yA, ...


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Similar to @Totem solution, except I think you should convert frequency to integer. array = [] with open('test.csv') as f: for line in f: temp, freq = line.split(',') try: freq = int(freq) except Exception as e: continue array.extend([temp] * freq) print array


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Try this: array = [] with open('myfile.txt') as f: for line in f: line = line.strip()[1: -1] # gives ex: '10, 0' try: temp, freq = [int(i) for i in line.split(',')] # a list comprehension except ValueError: continue array.extend([temp] * freq) This assumes that each line in the file looks like ...



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