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0

To try replicate one would need where the image comes from and also extractHOGFeatures function ?


0

Try making a distinct iterator, and use that, rather than iterating over the table list itself. It's just easier to see what's going on. For example: pdf("Myhistograms.pdf") for(i in 1:length(popTables)){ table = popTables[[i]] name = popNames[i] pVals = table$p hist(pVals, breaks=20, xlab="P-val", main=name)) } dev.off() In this ...


1

If you use np.histogram to pre-compute the histogram, as you found you'll get the hist array and the bin edges. plt.bar expects the bin centres, so calculate them with: xs = (bins[:-1] + bins[1:])/2 To adapt the Matplotlib example: from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np fig = plt.figure() ax = ...


2

In your case, the smooth frequency isn't actually doing anything (that only works when multiple points have the same x-coordinate, but by not specifying one, the default is to use the line number). We can get arid of the smooth frequency option and use the variable line color. If we wish to set every 5th box red, and the others blue, we can do plot ...


2

Try this set ylabel "Number of Exons" set style fill solid 1.0 noborder plot "test" using ($0+1):($2) w boxes lc 'blue' t '',\ 'test' u (($0*5)+5):($2):(1) every 5::4 w boxes lc 'red' t '' It gives you the following out put $0 stands for the line number (starting at 0) every 5::4 stands for every 5th line starting after line 4 when we do not use ...


0

Stata's main dataset, matrices that you access using matrix command and Mata matrices all live separately and need separate functions to deal with, but you can transfer the data between all three. In your case, you want to load a Mata matrix into the Stata dataset, which you can do as follows: clear getmata pvalue1000, double Please not that your ...


1

histogram expects a variable name, and you are first feeding it a matrix name, so no go there, as matrices and variables are utterly different in Stata. Conversely, when you then feed it a variable name, your variable pval contains only the single and last P-value put in it, as all previous incarnations of pval were cleared out of the way by your own code. ...


-1

the documentation have example use it, but in 2014a it is a simulink block, *Histogram Generate histogram of input or sequence of inputs The Histogram block computes the frequency distribution of the elements in the input. You must use the Find the histogram over parameter to specify whether the block computes the histogram for Each column of the input ...


0

Here is the official documentation: http://www.mathworks.com/help/matlab/ref/histogram.html?refresh=true . As noted, this was introduced in R2014b. The version command will show you what version you are running (R2014a or R2014b).


2

Simplest solution - the first line of your function should be: global mean_noise If you then run (outside the function): hist_maker() print(mean_noise) The print should work. If you reversed the order of those two lines, you'll get a NameError. Note, though, this is generally not considered good programming. The generally considered better solution ...


0

You can find the distribution using hist(x). Then by calculating the backwards cumsum() you can draw the desired plot. clc, clear all, close all seconds = 303; % Amount of time that passed during the test datapoints = 3000; % Amount of Datapoints in your vector x = randn(datapoints,1); [counts,centers] = ...


0

A workaround is to show the mids along the x-axis, with some hints from this Q/A. # plot histogram without axes d <- hist(dates, "years", freq=TRUE, xaxt="n") # these Date casts are optional, and show some the structure of the breaks d$mids <-d$mids + as.Date("1970-01-01") # "1970-07-01" "1971-07-01" d$breaks <- d$breaks + ...


1

You are trying to do element-wise logical AND, but use the wrong syntax. Use & instead of and, and encapsulate individual expressions into parentheses: data[(data>5.) & (data<100.)] Another way to do the same is to use numpy function logical_and: data[np.logical_and(data>5., data<100.)]


0

Here, I hope this can help you out A <- rnorm(1000) # this is seed_mass B <- rexp(1000) # this is thatch_mass colB <- rep(LETTERS[1:2], each = 1000) # this is to tell them apart colA <- c(A,B) # combine them together dt <- data.frame(colA, colB) # create Data frame ggplot(dt, aes(x = colA, fill = colB)) + geom_histogram(col = "black", ...


0

@Kevin, as the comments mention, you haven't provided any code in your question so I'm not entirely sure about what you are trying to do. Also, the phrase "layered histogram" is vague. If your goal is to create two histograms on the same plot then I would suggest looking here for how to do it in basic R and looking here for how to do it using the ggplot2 ...


3

I think the problem is the relative key. Try: set boxwidth 0.8 absolute


0

Convert your image to HSL color space (see, for example, RGB value to HSL converter) and then build the histogram the same way you would do it for an RGB image.


2

It's because the bar function takes an argument width, which is by default 0.8 (plt.bar(left, height, width=0.8, bottom=None, hold=None, **kwargs)), so you need to change it to the distance between two bars: pyplot.bar(hist1_flux[1], hist1_flux[0], width=hist1_flux[1][1] - hist1_flux[1][0])


1

If your text file looks like this: "breaks" "dens" "counts" "1" 0 0.75 3 "2" 0.2 1.25 5 "3" 0.4 1.5 6 "4" 0.6 0.75 3 "5" 0.8 0.75 3 You can create a histogram object by putting the relevant vectors into a list, then assigning its class attribute. Here is an example of a function that does that: make_hist <- function(df){ his <- list() binwidth ...


1

The normed=True setting normalizes the histogram to an area of 1. That gives the histogram an interpretation as estimates of probability density functions. In short, it actually makes sense not to normalize on the peak but on the area. But if you really want to normalize by height you can modify the polygon data of the histogram: h = ...


2

Just as I was about to finish up and post my question I found a satisfying answer to it, however not here on SO. As self-answering is encouraged, I'll post the Q+A instead of aborting this Q posting. Hence, based on the following Matlab Central thread, one neater solution is as follows: myRange = 5; % values in open interval [-myRange, myRange] A = ...


2

You need to set the fill argument to a factor which takes 2 levels: one for all the density values lower then the max and one for the maximum density: ggplot(a, aes(x = Middlepoint)) + geom_histogram(aes(y = ..density.., fill = cut(..density.., c(0, sort(..density.., TRUE)[1:2]))), binwidth = 1) + ...


1

I didn't expect this behavior, but this is a workaround: library(lubridate) hist(dates + dyears(1), "years", freq= TRUE)


0

Here's the solution I devised inspired from Teja_K 's answer: data = read.table("C:\\test\\test.csv", header=TRUE, sep=",") par( mar=c(3.1, 5.1, 0, 0)) hist.x <- hist(data$a, plot = FALSE, breaks=50) hist.x$counts <- log10(hist.x$counts + 1) plot(hist.x, col = rgb(0, 0, 1, 0.99), main="", xlab="", ylab="", yaxt="n") yAxesTitles=c(1, 10, 100, 1000, ...


0

If I understood you right that is what you need :) biomass<-c(1,5,7,6,3) count<-c(1,2,1,3,4) new<-NULL for (i in 1:length(biomass)) { new<-c(new, rep(biomass[i], count[i])) } new hist(new) So finally just type: new<-NULL for (i in 1:length(DF$Biomass)) { new<-c(new, rep(DF$Biomass[i], DF$Count[i])) } hist(new)


1

you're not making my life easy :) Is this what you want ? DF <- data.frame(Biomass=c(200,200,1500),Count = c(36,20,2)) DF2 <- aggregate(Count ~ Biomass,DF,sum) # sum different occurrences for each Biomass value barplot(DF2$Count,names.arg =DF2$Biomass) # presents them with a barplot, which is more appropriate than an histogram in the R sense here.


1

probably the best is to do a stats: stats 'file2.txt' u 1 hor_value=STATS_min and then add to your plot: plot "file1.txt" using 3:xticlabels(stringcolumn(1)."-".stringcolumn(2)) title columnheader, hor_value or alternatively put a line on top (before the last plot): set arrow nohead from graph 0, hor_value to graph 1, hor_value front


3

Would this example be close to what you are looking for? D3 has a histogram layout that does a lot of the computational legwork for you and can be plotted like any other bar graph. Just sum up the count data to create the CDF.


0

(Hi, I would use a comment for this but i just joined so today and don't yet have 50 reputation to comment!) I just had a look at - http://numerics.mathdotnet.com/api/MathNet.Numerics.Statistics/Histogram.htm. That documentation page (footer says it was built using http://docu.jagregory.com/) shows a public property named Item which returns a Bucket. I'm ...


2

Let's assume a continuous random variable X with values inside the interval 0 and 255 and with size 512x512, as mentioned in the paper, represented in this example as: >> X = randi(256, 512, 512) - 1; >> X = uint8(X); If we show this random variable as an image we have: >> imshow(X) And if we check it's histogram, we can see that ...


3

This is straightforward in R. All you need is column C and ?cut. Consider: d <- read.table(text="A B C 1 1.16 1.16 0 0.51 1.67 1 1.16 2.84 0 0.26 3.10 1 0.59 3.69 0 0.39 4.08 1 0.78 4.85 0 0.90 5.75 1 0.78 6.53 0 0.26 6.79 1 0.12 6.91 0 0.51 7.42 1 0.26 7.69 0 0.51 8.20 1 ...


1

You can use: histc x = [0:5:100]; y = histc(A,x, dim); where dim is the dimension along which to count. And then hist(y(:,1),x); hist(y(:,2),x); ...


0

You could use num2cell and cellfun, although I don't know how this compares with the naive method performance-wise. num2cell by default takes a matrix and converts it into a cell array where each cell contains one element of the matrix, but passing a second argument allows you to do so along a particular dimension. So for 2x3 matrix A, num2cell(A, 1) will ...


0

Split the array A into a cell array where each cell is a single column from the matrix: Acell = [mat2cell(A',ones(1,M))]'; Apply the function using cellfun to each cell of the cell array Acell counts = cellfun(@(x)histcounts(x,edges),Acell); counts will be a cell array with each cell containing histcounts from the respective column of A.


1

You have 3 questions: 1. How to remove the edges between histogram bars Here, you can set the linewidth to 0 for the call to bar: axis_2.bar( bins[:-1], ns[0] / ns[1], linewidth=0, alpha = 1, width = bins[1] - bins[0] ) 2. How to reduce the height of the second subplot Here, we can send kwargs to gridspec when we create the ...


0

Lets say you have an image with 120 pixels, and 12 different gray scale colors. Our goal is, to have first an equalized histogram, 120pixels / 12 colors = 10 pixels per color. How is done ? With two pointers, we start moving on the different colors. How is it done ? Look at colors 0-1-2 3 pixels with color 0 3 pixels with color 1 3 pixels with color 2 ...


0

I would suggest using date as DateTimeIndex. For pandas 0.17: df['date'] = pd.to_datetime(df.date).dt.year df.set_index('date', inplace=True) df.groupby(level='date').fruit.value_counts().unstack('fruit').plot.bar(stacked=True)


2

How about: df.groupby(df.date2.dt.year)['fruit']\ .value_counts()\ .unstack(1)\ .plot(kind='bar', stacked=True) Which yields:


1

With the caveats discussed in the comments, here's how to cut off the bars at 1000: # Save plot data in an object x=hist(rnorm(1e5),breaks=50,ylim = c(0,1000)) # Cut off counts at 1000 x$counts[x$counts>1000] = 1000 # Re-plot histogram. Max of y-range is > 1000 to show cutoff. plot(x, ylim=c(0,1500))


0

If I understand correctly, this is what you are hoping to achieve? import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy.random as nprnd import numpy as np LISTS = [] #Generate data for _ in range(3): LISTS.append(nprnd.randint(100, size=100)) #Find the maximum y value of every data set maxYs = [i[0].max() for i in map(plt.hist,LISTS)] print "maxYs:", maxYs ...


1

You need the rwidth parameter in your axis_1.hist(..) call You can adjust rwidth and bins to match your axis_2.bar(...) call (default width in bar is 0.8). e.g. matplotlib.pyplot.hist(a,bins=6,rwidth=0.8)


1

That's not how any of these functions work. You can't simply pass a large number of vectors to each. Take a look at the help files for each function (? hist, ? barplot, ? cor) to see what is possible. cor() expects a matrix as its first argument hist() expects a single vector as its first argument barplot() expects a vector of heights (not a raw vector) as ...


1

You can: titanic = pd.read_csv('titanic_data.csv') survival_by_age = titanic.groupby(['Age', 'Survived']).size().unstack('Survived') survival_by_age.columns = ['No', 'Yes'] survival_by_age.plot.bar(title='Survival by Age') to get: which you can further tweak. You could also consolidate the fractional ages so you can use integer indices, or bin the data ...


3

Without a reproducible data set I can't demonstrate what you're specifically using, but I suspect you are looking to create a barplot from scratch. You need to create a column of the requisite bins, probably using cut on whatever factor you want to aggregate, do the aggregation yourself, then plot that. Here's a toy example, aggregating by income bracket ...


3

Your problem is deeper that you realize. When R read in the data and saw the lone . it interpreted that column as a factor (categorical variable). You need to either convert the factor back to a numeric variable (this is FAQ 7.10) or reread the data forcing it to read that column as numeric, if you are using read.table or one of the functions that calls ...


1

The feature space in your image is 2D. Say you have an intensity image (so it's 1D) then you would just have a line (e.g. from 0 to 255) on which the points are located. The circles shown above would just be line segments on that [0,255] line. Depending on their means, these line segments would then shift, just like the circles do in 2D. You talked about ...


0

There is a fast way how to do this with hist3 function: [bins centers] = hist3(X); % X should be matrix with two columns c_1 = centers{1}; c_2 = centers{2}; pdf = bins / (sum(sum(bins))*(c_1(2)-c_1(1)) * (c_2(2)-c_2(1))); If you "integrate" this you will get 1. sum(sum(pdf * (c_1(2)-c_1(1)) * (c_2(2)-c_2(1))))


3

something like this set.seed(99) foo <- hist(rnorm(100, mean = 100, sd = 40), breaks=7, plot = FALSE) foo # $breaks # [1] -50 0 50 100 150 200 # # $counts # [1] 2 11 34 47 6 # # $density # [1] 0.0004 0.0022 0.0068 0.0094 0.0012 # # $mids # [1] -25 25 75 125 175 # # $xname # [1] "rnorm(100, mean = 100, sd = 40)" # # $equidist # [1] TRUE # # ...


2

here is something to help you started. First, I had to replace all your "," by "." in your data frame. If you want to show both columns, you will need to convert your data frame from wide to long. I also added a way to color differently your bars, which you can change as you wish. library(ggplot2) library(reshape2) data_wide <- read.table(text=" ...


0

Does the following work for you? (using some adapted code from the link you gave) import scipy.stats as stats plt.suptitle('NO2 and Temperature Residuals night-time', fontsize=20) WSx_rm = nighttime['Temperature'] WSx_rm = sm.add_constant(WSx_rm) NO2_WS_RM_mod = sm.OLS(nighttime.NO2, WSx_rm, missing = ...



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