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1

Not sure how the default vector function creates the breaks but you can override them explicitly. For example, hist(c(1,2,3,4,5), breaks=c(.5,1.5,2.5,3.5,4.5,5.5)) will give you the evenly distributed histogram


1

A really simple solution: x <- 1:6 # The same as your x <- c(1,2,3,4,5,6) hist(x, breaks=0:6)


0

Here's a class that takes a histogram and the values that correspond to each histogram bucket. The random method returns a random value with the same distribution as the histogram. import bisect import random def accumulate(iterable): ''' Produce an accumulated total of the input; adapted from Python 3 itertools.accumulate ''' it = ...


0

You are doing nothing wrong, the tkcanvas terminal simply doesn't support filled polygons and rotated text, as the test command also tells you: To see this, use the simple script set terminal tkcanvas set output 'test.file' test And then, after invoking wish, execute the following Tcl/Tk commands: source test.file canvas .c pack .c gnuplot .c which on ...


-1

Well, using that package wouldn't be the point as i have to use matplotlib myself to understand how it works.


0

Check out pandas. It is a package for statistics which has a convenient container called a DataFrame, with which you can perform stats and plot directly. It is also convenient for reading and writing files directly to/from this container. The syntax takes a bit of getting used to. Matplotlib syntax is simple whether using pandas or not. It's getting the ...


0

@WillieEkaputra you have to delete the bracket after the path and put a comma there. Like this: Daten <- read.table(file="C:/Users/WillieEkaPutra/Documents/.../Schueler.txt", header=TRUE) This should make it work, if the path is right.


1

I changed the output a little bit (removed the space before the comma) so that I don't look like uneducated. puts "Enter string: " gets.chomp.downcase .each_char.with_object(Hash.new(0)){|c, h| h[c] += 1} .sort_by{|_, v| v} .reverse .each{|k, v| puts k + ", " + v.to_s + " " + "*" * v} Output: Enter string: uuuuiiii i, 4 **** u, 4 ****


0

It looks like you are attempting to draw the histogram based on strings, rather than on numbers. Try something like this instead: from matplotlib import pyplot import random # generate a series of numbers a = [random.randint(1, 10) for _ in xrange(100)] # generate a series of strings that look like numbers b = [str(n) for n in a] # try to create histograms ...


0

try this perhaps? for line in range(y_max, 0, -20): if line%100 == 0: s = '{:>8}'.format(str(line)+' |') # add 2 spaces so y-axis align with 0 else: s = '{:>8}'.format('|') this is a stripped down version (if line%2 ==0 based on your samples) and it outputs: $ python3 hist.py keys.txt Length Count ...


2

From the documentation of Mat: //! the number of rows and columns or (-1, -1) when the array has more than 2 dimensions But you have 3 dimensions. You can access individual values of your histogram using hist.at<T>(i,j,k). Or you can use iterators as described in the documentation here. Code // Build with gcc main.cpp -lopencv_highgui ...


0

By using i as upper limit in loop, you are simply saying print 'X' i number of times. for(j=0;j < i;j++) { printf(" X "); } Maybe you can replace it with ch[i].


0

In order to assign the descriptors to clusters, you have to choose a distance metric. A simple choice would be the Euclidean distance. Then you need to compute the distance from the training descriptors to each cluster centroid, and assign them to the cluster whose centroid is closer to the descriptor than the centroids of any other cluster. After you've ...


1

You're really close! What you want is to call .data(data) to bind all your data, not just the ages. This will make the data available to the callbacks bound with .on at the end. So why are you passing in allAge? Well, because that's what you're getting back from the histogram function. The docs state that The return value is an array of arrays: each ...


1

You can calculate the area in this way: import numpy import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = numpy.random.randn(1000) values, bins, _ = plt.hist(x, normed=True) area = sum(numpy.diff(bins)*values)


0

i may be wrong here, but I guess the intuition is to quantize the feature space. So, you could basically do bag of words with different code book sizes (128,64,32...) and use their kernel to compute similarity between 2 images.


1

Well you are missing a call to histfit for your second histogram, so the line does not appear at all. Here is a sample code which works fine. Notice how I use findobj to fetch the actual lines and change their colors: rng default; % For reproducibility %// Generate dummy data S = normrnd(10,1,100,1); R = 3*normrnd(10,1,100,1); % Histograms ...


2

So the problem is that the image created by hist2d is plotted in data coordinates, but the contours you are trying to create are in pixel coordinates. The simple way around this is to specify the extent of the contours (i.e. rescale/reposition them in the x and y axes). For example: from matplotlib.colors import LogNorm from matplotlib.pyplot import * x = ...


1

He is binning with lb <= x < up and splitting the interval [0,180] in [-10,10), [10, 30), [30,40) ..., [150,170), [170,190). Suppose x = 180, then: bin = floor(180/20-0.5) = floor(9-0.5) = floor(8.5) = 8; while if x = 0: bin = floor(`0/20-0.5) = floor(-0.5) = floor(-1) = -1; which respectively translate into x1 = 20 * (8+0.5) = 170 and x1 = ...


1

This code works as you said for (int a = 0; a < 9; a++) { if (hm <= arr[a]) //hm is Maximum number in array for height of a column. hm = arr[a]; } for (int i = hm; i >= 0; i--) { printf("|"); //for(int t = 0; t < width; t++){ //Width is where i got in trouble. //printf("|"); for (int a = 0; a < 9; ++a) { ...


1

I think you want something like this, (?P<colors>\d+):\s*\(\s*(?P<red>\d+),\s*(?P<green>\d+),\s*(?P<blue>\d+) DEMO


0

you can use this regex for getting the values in srgb: $str = "588: ( 99, 75, 52) #634B34 srgb(99,75,52)"; preg_match_all("/srgb\s*\(\s*(\d+)\s*,\s*(\d+)\s*,\s*(\d+)\s*\)/i", $str, $matches); var_dump($matches); so if you have your string always like this: substr($str, 0,3); will be 588


1

You can compute the number of unique values, and generate text labels outside the hist() computations. There are more efficient ways to do this split-apply-combine operation (look into dplyr and data.table), but the code below implements it with minimal changes: data= "SampleID Pos Dep Pvalues sample_1 849 62 0.02755358 sample_1 859 63 0.07406833 sample_1 ...


1

You can try to convert the data to double: y = double(part(:)); figure; hist(y);


0

To handle time series with millions of points, you could try pandas: #!/usr/bin/env python from io import StringIO import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # $ pip install matplotlib import pandas as pd csv_file = StringIO(u"""time,A,B 2013-09-03 17:34:04,1,2 2013-09-03 17:34:05,3,4 2013-09-03 17:34:10,4,5 """) df = pd.read_csv(csv_file, parse_dates=True, ...


0

Try this: Quantile line geom_vline(xintercept=quantile, color="red", linetype="dashed", size=1) Density geom_histogram(aes(y=..density..), binwidth=1, colour="black", fill="white") + geom_density(fill=NA, colour="royalblue") Hope it helps


0

Okay I finally got something to work with headings, titles, etc. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas as pd data = pd.read_csv('D1.csv', quoting=2) data.hist(bins=50) plt.xlim([0,115000]) plt.title("Data") plt.xlabel("Value") plt.ylabel("Frequency") plt.show() My first problem was that matplotlib is necessary to actually show the graph as stated ...


0

Okay I finally got something to work with headings, titles, etc. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas as pd data = pd.read_csv('D1.csv', quoting=2) data.hist(bins=50) plt.xlim([0,115000]) plt.title("Data") plt.xlabel("Value") plt.ylabel("Frequency") plt.show() My first problem was that matplotlib is necessary to actually show the graph. Also, I ...


0

I need more rep to comment, so I put this as answer. You need to have a header row with the names you want to use on pandas. Also if you want to see the histogram when you are working from python shell or ipython you need to import pyplot import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas as pd pd.read_csv('D1.csv', quoting=2)['A'].hist(bins=50) plt.show()


1

You can do it in one line with pandas: import pandas as pd pd.read_csv('D1.csv', quoting=2)['column_you_want'].hist(bins=50)


0

Well, firstly what you're computing is just the LBP pattern, not the histogram - for which you need to create an array of bins and generate the histogram of the LBP feature. In bytefish's code, if you look into the github you'll also find code to generate the histogram with 59 bins.


0

I solved the problem using Dan's solution. I took a histogram of each vector (with specific bin intervals), and stored them all in a 2D matrix (Each column is a complete histogram). Then displayed it with image() (Don't have access to imshow). I did have to mess around with the axis labels though, as the image() function was plotting it according to the ...


0

The typical way of showing multiple distributions on a single plot is a box and whiskers plot. Use the built-in boxplot() function for this. The example found in the manual is as follows: % Box plot of car gas mileage grouped by country load carsmall [sortedMPG,sortedOrder] = sort(grpstats(MPG,Origin,@median)); pos(sortedOrder) = 1:6; boxplot(MPG, Origin, ...


0

@Dirk Eddelbuettel: The basic idea is excellent but the code as shown can be improved. [Takes long to explain, hence a separate answer and not a comment.] The hist() function by default draws plots, so you need to add the plot=FALSE option. Moreover, it is clearer to establish the plot area by a plot(0,0,type="n",...) call in which you can add the axis ...


0

Try this - really ugly code, but works if I understand you correctly. You might want to play with geom_density and maybe remove fill to make it more readable. nbin<- 5 m <- ggplot(plotData, aes(x = value, color = group, fill = group, group = group)) m <- m + geom_histogram(data = subset(plotData, variable == "p1"), ...


1

Histograms are for time series data. You probably want a term panel.


0

Oh 7 hours no answer, try these links: http://www.mathworks.in/matlabcentral/fileexchange/46012-2d-weighted-histogram http://www.mathworks.in/matlabcentral/fileexchange/42493-generate-weighted-histogram http://www.mathworks.in/matlabcentral/answers/81805-how-to-make-a-weighted-histogram-with-specific-bins


1

You need to use the .ticks() call on the xAxis. I use d3.js, rather than dc.js, but looking at the docs I think that something like this should work: .xAxis().ticks(50)


2

A simple way to do this is to create a new vector. Something like: with(Heiser, { color_HCC1008 <- ifelse(Heiser$CellLines == "HCC1008", col1, col2) text(ZEB1, pos, labels = CellLines, srt = 45, cex = 0.9, col = color_HCC1008) }) where col1 and col2 are your different colors. All you're doing here is saying "I want this index to have this color, ...


0

Use time.strptime() to convert the local time string to a time.struct_time and then time.mktime(), which will convert the time.struct_time to the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00, UTC. #! /usr/bin/env python import time def timestr_to_secs(timestr): fmt = '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S' time_struct = time.strptime(timestr, fmt) secs = ...


1

Sorry I am not familiar with matplotlib. So I have a dirty hack for you. I just put all values that greater than 300 in one bin and changed the bin size. The root of the problem is that matplotlib tries to put all bins on the plot. In R I would convert my bins to factor variable, so they are not treated as real numbers. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ...


1

You need the min of all values in addition to max. Your condition will then be: if ((value - min) / (max - min) * lines < currentline) addch('*'); else addch(' '); (The quotient (value - min) / (max - min) is between 0 and 1 and requires floating-point arithmetic.)


2

extract is never called in Histogram (which should preferrably implement Runnable) @Override public void run() { extract(); }


2

The function that goes hand in hand with hist is bar In your case, you already have your histogram/distribution values (so no need to call hist), you can directly call bar: bar( YourvectorOfBins , probden )


0

Googling for the error lead me to the following SO question. The problem is that mainPanel should be called within sideBarLayout. At a casual glance it looks like you do this, but careful inspection of the brackets reveals that you do not in fact. The correct ui.R should be: shinyUI(fluidPage( titlePanel(title = h4("Katrina Data Shiny Application - a ...


1

Your problem is just scaling! You just have to change the freq parameter of hist from TRUE to FALSE: hh=hist( vec, breaks=round(n/10), freq=FALSE, xlim=c( floor(min(vec)), ceiling(max(vec)), col="grey" ) By doing so, you plot in y-axis the density rather than the frequency (number of appearance of each bin).


0

Histograms can also be plotted with ggplot. Using @flodel's data: dd = data.frame(table(sums)) ggplot(dd)+geom_bar(aes(x=sums, y=Freq), stat='identity')


3

You could just do a barplot of the frequency table: num.dices <- 2L num.rolls <- 100000L outcomes <- matrix(sample(1:6, num.dices * num.rolls, replace = TRUE), nrow = num.rolls, ncol = num.dices) sums <- rowSums(outcomes) barplot(table(sums))


1

Ahh, it didn't occur to me until now that I don't have to use a list of breaks; I can simply calculate the bin index from the value and use the existing aggregate: binw <- 0.1 data$bin <- floor(log10(data$value) / binw) hdata <- aggregate(count ~ bin, data, sum) print(ggplot(hdata) + aes(xmin=10^(bin * binw), xmax=10^((bin + ...


2

Minimum peak separation Specify the minimum peak distance, or minimum separation between peaks as a positive integer. You can use the 'MINPEAKDISTANCE' option to specify that the algorithm ignore small peaks that occur in the neighborhood of a larger peak. When you specify a value for 'MINPEAKDISTANCE', the algorithm initially identifies all the ...



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