Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

$_ is the current element of @list The code can be rewritten as follows: # Enumerate all values in the input list foreach my $value (@list) { # Compute histogram bin into which to place the current value my $bin_index = ceil(($value + 1) / $bin_width) - 1; # Increment the number of values in the bin $histogram{$bin_index}++; }


0

$_ is the current context value. In this case, the current iteration element of your for @list loop. The hash contains the number of occurrences for each "bin". The bin is calculated using the ceil function and a $bin_width, and it serves as the key for the hash (the value is the occurrence counter that gets accumulated into). The ++ increments the ...


1

$_ here is used as implicit foreach variable; same thing could be explicitly written as my %histogram; for my $n (@list) { my $key = ceil(($n + 1) / $bin_width) -1; $histogram{$key} += 1; }


0

It is a postfix for loop. Your attempt to print $_ is probably failing because you are putting it outside the loop (but you didn't share your code for that attempt). It could be rewritten as: my %histogram; for my $value (@list) { $histogram{ceil(($value + 1) / $bin_width) -1}++ }


2

Such functions exist. You just need to store the patches returned by hist and access the facecolor of each of them: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt n, bins, patches = plt.hist([1,2,3]) for p in patches: print p.get_facecolor() p.set_facecolor((1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0)) Output: (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, 0.0, 1.0) (0.0, 0.5, ...


1

Its sounds like you want to do the following. With your data in a csv call bar.csv having this format: Dept Mean Median Trimmed_Mean Lobby 0.008 0.0018 0.0058 R & D 6.25 3.2 4.78 ROE 19.08 16.66 16.276 You can use library(ggplot2) and library(reshape) and the commands listed here dat.m<-read.csv("bar.csv") ...


0

In response to question 1: The purpose of histograms is to display the density or frequency of continuous data. If you're trying to compare the mean / median / trimmed mean across the 3 categories in the row.name column, I suggest bar graphs. I'm not sure comparing mean / median / trimmed mean in a single graph is coherent to viewers, so it may be ideal to ...


1

For me this gives the desired results. df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(5000)) df.hist(normed = True) The 'density' option works in numpy's histogram function but not on pandas's hist function.


1

You can pass density parameter to hist, like this df.hist(..., density=True) Here, density is passed as kwds to np.hist. Reference: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.DataFrame.hist.html http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.histogram.html


4

By default, ggplot uses range/30 as binwidth, as prompted. In your case, it is approximately 48/30 (depends on the seed), which is more than 1 and is around 1.5. Now, your data is not continuous, you only get integers, so for any two adjacent histogram bins you'll get irregularities, caused by the fact that the first bin will only contain one possible ...


0

When plotting histograms with errorbars you need to give only two columns in the using statement. The first column gives the box height, the second one is ±<error>: set style histogram errorbars gap 1 lw 1 set style data histograms plot "ctcf.dat" using 2:3:xtic(1)


2

Just plot your histogram and capture the output (you'll still need to multiply the density by 100 to get to % before plotting): h <- hist(coeff_value,plot=F,breaks=10) h$density <- h$density*100 plot(h, freq=F, xlab="rate", ylab="Probability (%)", ylim=c(0, 25), col="gray") densF <- density(coeff_value) lines(densF$x, densF$y*100, ...


4

As far as I can tell, pandas can't handle this situation. That's ok since all of their plotting methods are for convenience only. You'll need to use matplotlib directly. Here's how I do it: %matplotlib inline import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas #import seaborn #seaborn.set(style='ticks') np.random.seed(0) df = ...


0

I recently used pandas for doing the same thing. If you're reading from csv/text then it could be really easy. import pandas as pd data = pd.read_csv("yourfile.csv") # columns a,b,c,etc data.hist(bins=20) It's really just wrapping the matplotlib into one call, but works nicely.


2

How about this. First, define the labels labelat <- seq(as.Date("2000-03-01"), as.Date("2001-03-01"), by="1 month") labels <- strftime(labelat, "%b %d") labelat <- labelat-labelat[1] Then use them in the scale_x_continuous ... scale_x_continuous(expand = c(0, 0), breaks=as.numeric(labelat), labels=labels) + ... which gives


2

Using gnuplot there are several ways to achieve this. Here is one option, which I find quite reasonable:: Store the values belonging to one v-value in one data block. Two data blocks are separated with two new lines from each other. So an example data file might be: # v1 values -0.5 1.1 0.4 -0.2 # v2 values -0.1 0.1 -0.7 # v3 values 0.9 0.5 0.2 The ...


1

You don't seem to be counting anything, so your plot isn't a histogram. It's a bunch of vertical 1D scatter plots arranged horizontally. The following uses matplotlib to get pretty close to your mock up (out of habit, I renamed "Differences" to the fairly conventional term "Residuals"): import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt ...


0

Solved! One possible solution is using a dynamic query like this: DECLARE @cols AS NVARCHAR(MAX), @query_histogram_3d AS NVARCHAR(MAX) select @cols = STUFF((SELECT',' + QUOTENAME(H3D_X) FROM SL_HISTOGRAM_3D WHERE H3D_CL_ID = @CYCLE_ID GROUP BY H3D_X ORDER BY H3D_X FOR XML ...


3

This is probably when you want to use matplotlib's object-oriented interface. There are a couple ways that you could handle this. First, you could want each plot on an entirely separate figure. In which case, matplotlib lets you keep track of various figures. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt a = np.random.normal(size=200) b = ...


3

A solution for histograms is as follows: import pylab as pl N, bins, patches = pl.hist(pl.rand(1000), 20) jet = pl.get_cmap('jet', len(patches)) for i in range(len(patches)): patches[i].set_facecolor(jet(i)) Result: I hope that's what you are looking for.


1

To get values actually plotted you can use function ggplot_build() where argument is your plot. p <- ggplot(mtcars,aes(mpg))+geom_histogram()+ facet_wrap(~cyl)+geom_vline(data=data.frame(x=c(20,30)),aes(xintercept=x)) pg <- ggplot_build(p) This will make list and one of sublists is named data. This sublist contains dataframe with values used ...


0

I've never heard of a "bin similarity matrix" and a search didn't turn up anything, so I'm just telling you here how I would compare histograms. The standard approach in statistics is to use Pearson's chi-squared statistic. Note however that the associated hypothesis test assumes that one of the two distributions is known exactly, so you can't use it. You ...


0

Let's read in your data: goose <- read.table(header = TRUE, text = "Index DateLost DateLost1 Nested 1 2/5/1988 1988-02-05 N 2 5/20/1988 1988-05-20 N 3 1/31/1985 1985-01-31 N 4 9/6/1997 1997-09-06 Y 5 9/24/1996 1996-09-24 N 6 9/27/1996 1996-09-27 N 7 9/15/1997 1997-09-15 Y 8 1/18/1989 1989-01-18 Y 9 ...


0

A (very simple) base R solution: dd <- structure(list(name = c("bass.karen", "braley", "chu", "cicilline", "clinton", "conyers"), total = c(13L, 48L, 18L, 18L, 56L, 54L ), ratio.dis = c(2, 2.5625, 2.166667, 2.5, 2, 2.555556), n = c(5L, 16L, 6L, 6L, 18L, 18L), ratio.opt = c(2.6, 3, 3, 3, 3.111111, 3)), .Names = c("name", "total", "ratio.dis", "n", ...


0

Following may be helpful: ddf = structure(list(name = c("bass.karen", "braley", "chu", "cicilline", "clinton", "conyers"), total = c(13L, 48L, 18L, 18L, 56L, 54L ), ratio.dis = c(2, 2.5625, 2.166667, 2.5, 2, 2.555556), n = c(5L, 16L, 6L, 6L, 18L, 18L), ratio.opt = c(2.6, 3, 3, 3, 3.111111, 3)), .Names = c("name", "total", "ratio.dis", "n", "ratio.opt" ), ...


2

import pandas as pd from matplotlib import pyplot as plt import numpy as np mydict = {0: 8012,25: 3710,100: 10794,200: 11718,300: 2489,500: 7631,600: 34,700: 115,1000: 3099,1200: 1766,1600: 63,2000: 1538,2200: 41,2500: 208,2700: 2138,5000: 515,5500: 201,8800: 10,10000: 10,10900: 465,13000: 9,16200: 74,20000: 518,21500: 65,27000: 64,53000: 82,56000: ...


2

I don't think there is a function that will automatically prepare data for a histogram (including the calculation of the right number of buckets), but you can quite easily create histograms using Seq.countBy. For example, given a sequence of numbers nums between -1 and 1, you can write something like: nums |> Seq.countBy (fun v -> round(v*10.0)) ...


0

Sorry, as being the author of JFeatureLib I hadn't watched for issues here (just on the mailinglist). Sure, you can use the euclidean dist on these vectors. For higher dimensional vectors (10+ or 20+) you might want to consider the cosine dist as it ususally provides better results. But this is something you might simply test in your application. And yes, ...


1

take a look on this: import numpy as np n=101 x = [np.random.randint(0, 12) for i in range(n)] y = [np.random.randint(0, 12) for i in range(n)] z = [np.random.random() for i in range(n)] #coord=[(x[i],y[i]) for i in range(n)] m=np.asarray([x,y]).transpose() d=dict() for i in range(n): coord=tuple(m[i]) d[coord]=d[coord]+[z[i]] if coord in d ...


1

Following simple version works: ggplot(eventdata, aes(x = factor(months), fill = season)) + geom_histogram()+ coord_polar()


0

Here's an example of how you can display multiple plots side-by-side below a larger one using Gridspec: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # generate some data x = np.arange(0, 10, 0.2) y = np.sin(x) # plot it fig = plt.figure(figsize=(8, 6)) ax0 = plt.subplot2grid((2, 4), (0, 0), colspan=4) ax0.plot(x, y) ax1 = plt.subplot2grid((2, 4), ...


0

I assume, your classes are groups of images having visual similarities. Then: each image is an instance image histogram is nothing else as a transformed/reduced image-data, so each image histogram is also an instance each bin in the histogram is a feature I'd suggest, you convert your histograms in text files and use the binary tools and this ...


1

Yes, you can compute the histogram with numpy and renormalise it. x = np.random.normal(0,.5,1000) y = np.random.normal(0,.5,100000) xhist, xbins = np.histogram(x, normed=True) yhist, ybins = np.histogram(x, normed=True) And now, you apply your regularisation. For example, if you want x to be normalised to 1 and y proportional: yhist *= len(y) / len(x) ...


1

Here is a simple solution where you loop through your $dataArray, $step_size = 1000; $histogramArray = array(); foreach ($dataArray as $v) { $k = (int)ceil($v / $step_size) * $step_size; if (!array_key_exists($k, $histogramArray)) $histogramArray[$k] = 0; $histogramArray[$k]++; } And the output would be, Array ( [1000] => 3 ...


1

You can build the output directly to avoid mapping the entire data array just to make use of array_count_values(); below is a more generic implementation that allows the mapping to be done outside of the function itself: function array_count_values_callback(array $data, callable $fn) { $freq = []; foreach ($data as $item) { $key = ...


3

$step = 1000; $result = array_count_values( array_map( function ($value) use ($step) { return (int) ceil($value / $step) * $step; }, $dataArray ) ); var_dump($result);


1

The rounding solution seems pretty straight forward: $step_size = 10; $data = array(10, 20, 24, 30, 35, 50); foreach ($data as $index => $value) { $data[$index] = round($value / $step_size) * $step_size; } // array(10, 20, 20, 30, 40, 50);


1

Both vectors (x and y) have 256 observations. Are these observations paired, i.e., for each x there is a corresponding y, and they have the same unit of measurement? If yes, you can subtract one vector from the other and just plot the histogram of their differences to compare each other. Something like below: length(x) #check number os observations in x ...


1

I think this does what you want (as per comments). The bar around 50 is split into the two colors. This is done by using a patch to change the color of part of that bar. %// Data: X = [32 64 32 12 56 76 65 44 89 87 78 56 96 90 86 95 100 65]; %// data values D = 50; %// where to divide into two colors %// Histogram plot: [y n] = hist(X); %// y: values; n: ...


0

X = [32 64 32 12 56 76 65 44 89 87 78 56 96 90 86 95 100 65]; then you create an histogram, but you are only going to use this to get the numbers of bins, the numbers of elements and positions: [N,XX]=hist(X); close all and finally here is the code where you use the Number of elements (N) and the position (XX) of the previous hist and color them ...


0

First sort X: X = [32 64 32 12 56 76 65 44 89 87 78 56 96 90 86 95 100 65]; sorted_X = sort(X) sorted_X : sorted_X = Columns 1 through 14 12 32 32 44 56 56 64 65 65 76 78 86 87 89 Columns 15 through 18 90 95 96 100 Then split the data based on 50: idx1 = find(sorted_X<=50,1,'last'); A = ...


1

The way to get data with different colors is to split the data into groups. In your case, split the data into three groups. For example with three groups: hist(data1); hold on; hist(data2); hist(data3); h = findobj(gca,’Type’,’patch’); display(h) set(h(1),’FaceColor’,’r’,’EdgeColor’,’k’); set(h(2),’FaceColor’,’g’,’EdgeColor’,’k’); ...


1

The reason for the error that you’re encountering is that OpenCV's cv2.compareHist function expects an Nx1 column array of bin counts, while the Numpy histogram function returns a tuple of the form (bin_counts, bin_edges). (See here to get some info about the OpenCV histogram functionality as exposed via Python bindings.) If you’re comparing colour images ...


1

Did you set up the ranges correctly? Based on the example: http://docs.opencv.org/modules/imgproc/doc/histograms.html#calchist cv::Mat bgr(480, 640, CV_8UC3, cv::Scalar(255.0, 255.0, 255.0)); // Quantize the B, G and R channels to 30 levels int histSize[] = {30, 30, 30}; // B, G and R varies from 0 to 255 float bRanges[] = { 0, 256 }; float gRanges[] = { ...


0

It depends on your use case. Are the images generic, or are they taken under similar lighting conditions and perspectives? The approaches can be classified according to the complexity of the model. Essentially, we can distinguish direct vs feature-based approaches. Direct (or intensity-based) methods attempt to (iteratively) estimate the similarity by ...


0

If oFreqs is a tuple, this (oFreqs + width,) will not do what you think it should. Adding two tuples just concatenates them. If you want to add a constant to all parts of a tuple, you should be using numpy arrays (because you have numpy available as you are using matplotlib. Try: import numpy as np ... yPart = xyParts.bar(np.array(oFreqs) + width, ...) ...


1

I've found the source of your script: Gnuplot Histogram Cluster (Bar Chart) with One Line per Category :) I had thought about a solution like solution 2 mentioned in that answer, but that doesn't work properly with the red and green colors beneath each other plus stacking the data. The script you posted needs only very little modifications. In order to put ...


1

I've made a tool named Images similarities searcher for this purpose as free software available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/imgndxr/ It use two libraries: LIRE : http://www.semanticmetadata.net/lire/ The LIRE (Lucene Image REtrieval) library provides a simple way to retrieve images and photos based on their color and texture ...


3

Without sample data, it's always difficult to get reproducible results, so i've created a sample dataset set.seed(16) mydata <- data.frame(myvariable=rnorm(500, 1500000, 10000)) #base histogram hist(mydata$myvariable) As you've learned, hist() is a generic function. If you want to see the different implementations you can type methods(hist). Most of ...


1

This part explains it: There are too many possible depths and counting each one would result in a histogram with a lot of bins so we divide the distance by four which means we only need a quarter of the number of bins: int[] count = new int[0x1FFF / 4 +1]; By dividing the depth values by 4 you are reducing the number of bins by lowering the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included