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Things are "stretched" because you're using imshow. By default, it assumes that you want to display an image where the aspect ratio of the plot will be 1 (in data coordinates). If you want to disable this behavior, and have the pixels stretch to fill up the plot, just specify aspect="auto". For example, to reproduce your problem (based on your code ...


2

Not sure but I think you should try to modify your historgram2d : H, xedges, yedges = np.histogram2d(x, y, bins=(25, 25), range=[[-50, 50], [0, 10]]) EDIT : I didn't find how to exactly fix the ratio, but with aspect='auto', matplotlib guess it right: plt.imshow(hist.T, extent=extent, interpolation='nearest', aspect='auto')


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The histogram2d function returns a triple: H : ndarray, shape(nx, ny) The bi-dimensional histogram of samples `x` and `y`. Values in `x` are histogrammed along the first dimension and values in `y` are histogrammed along the second dimension. xedges : ndarray, shape(nx,) The bin edges along the first dimension. yedges : ndarray, shape(ny,) ...


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As @seberg notes in the comments, Z is a matrix, so it must be cast as an array before slicing. np.asarray(Z)[:,0] The reason this is necessary is because the np.matrix maintains its two-dimensionality even after slicing, so that the column of matrix has shape (N,1), not (N,) as the histogram functions expect. The reason it doesn't work to cast to an ...


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Ok, so I figured it out. Here is my solution (I feel strange giving my own solution to this). # ============================================================================= # Plot central cross-section of sphere under steady-state conditions # where the temperature on upper hemisphere is T=T_0 and the lower # hemisphere is held at T=0. This is an ...


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To set the xtic labels, you can use using 2:xtic(1) in the very first command. To see the labels properly you must set the alignment of the xtics to right. And you can include the conversion command to rotate the plot inside the script. Call it with system. You must use set output without filename before that to indicate, that the file must be flushed and ...


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you're using 4x4 = 16 bins. If you want four total bins, use 2x2: In [45]: np.histogram2d(x, y, bins=2) Out[45]: (array([[ 1., 1.], [ 2., 1.]]), array([-0.3, 0. , 0.3]), array([-0.4 , -0.05, 0.3 ])) You can specify the full shape of the output with a tuple: bins=(2,2) If you want to normalize the output, use normed=True: In [50]: ...


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heatmap, xedges, yedges = np.histogram2d(x, y, bins=4) heatmap /= heatmap.sum() In [57]: heatmap, xedges, yedges = np.histogram2d(x, y, bins=4) In [58]: heatmap Out[58]: array([[ 1., 0., 0., 1.], [ 0., 0., 0., 0.], [ 0., 0., 0., 0.], [ 2., 0., 0., 1.]]) In [59]: heatmap /= heatmap.sum() In [60]: heatmap Out[60]: ...



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