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352

I will try to remember what I said, but none of the answers so far are correct (every one of them was done in the 60s and 70s before the commercialization of PCs in the 80s). However, we could start all over and try to think of new inventions in computing since the 1980s.


261

There's at least one hard advantage to this guideline when working on a terminal emulator: All Unix tools expect this convention and work with it. For instance, when concatenating files with cat, a file terminated by newline will have a different effect than one without: $ more a.txt foo$ more b.txt bar $ more c.txt baz $ cat *.txt foobar baz And, as the ...


143

Each line should be terminated in a newline character, including the last one. Some programs have problems processing the last line of a file if it isn't newline terminated. GCC warns about it not because it can't process the file, but because it has to as part of the standard. The C language standard says A source file that is not empty shall end ...


117

Disclaimer: I am a Dojo committer, but this is my personal view as a JavaScript insider. First of all: the graph is absolutely and completely incorrect. Look at the chart link closely, and read "events". This is the list of events "related" to Dojo: "Declaring Dojo for Ajax" — ok, it may be relevant. "IT Dojo: Stop programs from running when Windows ...


110

Many Python web frameworks already existed when Django appeared in 2005 -- indeed, the joke was already going around, by then, that Python is "the language with more web frameworks than keywords" (and Guido rejected my proposal to fix that in Py3k by adding many, many more keywords). Now "django" per se is a bit ambiguous as a search term (it's also the name ...


110

I'm going to disagree with the trend here. I'll go on record: I do not agree that DBNull serves any useful purpose; it adds unnecessary confusion, while contributing virtually no value. The argument is often put forward that null is an invalid reference, and that DBNull is a null object pattern; neither is true. For example: int? x = null; this is ...


103

I think there were a few factors, the combination of which was greater than the sum of their individual weights. One is simply timing: Django appeared right as the first big wave of Rails hype was ramping up, and so it was immediately portrayed as being sort of "Python's answer to Rails". That resulted in a not-insignificant number of eyeballs on the ...


92

There's many reasons you don't just have a huge number of registers: They're highly linked to most pipeline stages. For starters, you need to track their lifetime, and forward results back to previous stages. The complexity gets intractable very quickly, and the number of wires (literally) involved grows at the same rate. It's expensive on area, which ...


76

Fortran is still used pretty often in scientific circles or on supercomputers for heavy numerical processing. Recently I was at the Max Planck institute for plasma physics near here and they do a pretty large part of their simulations in Fortran. Besides, the language standards themselves are still in pretty active development, the latest efforts dating back ...


73

IronPython came first and the rest followed. As for why IronPython is called IronPython, Jim Hugunin goes into that in this video (at about 14:00). He says it was partly to avoid calling it Language.NET or Language#, and the idea is that Iron languages are: True language implementations True to the language True to the community True to the experience ...


68

Try git log --reverse.


63

It comes from the history of using integer values as booleans. If x is an int, but I am using it as a boolean as per if(x)... then incrementing will mean that whatever its truth value before the operation, it will have a truth-value of true after it (barring overflow). However, it's impossible to predict the result of -- given knowledge only of the truth ...


62

tl;dr "Foo" and "bar" as metasyntactic variables were popularised by MIT and DEC, the first references are in work on LISP and PDP-1 and Project MAC from 1964 onwards. Many of these people were in MIT's Tech Model Railroad Club, where we find the first documented use of "foo" in tech circles in 1959 (and a variant in 1958). Both "foo" and "bar" (and even ...


51

git checkout <commit> <filename>


51

this should do it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozilla When users visit a website (via a user agent such as a web browser), a text string is generally sent to identify the user agent to the web server. It is known as the "user agent string". The Netscape web browser identified itself as "Mozilla/" followed by some information about the ...


49

Quoting an example from git-filter-branch(1) To rewrite the repository to look as if foodir/ has been its project root, and discard all other history: git filter-branch --subdirectory-filter foodir -- --all Thus you can, e.g., turn a library subdirectory into a repository of its own. Note the -- that separates filter-branch options from revision ...


46

Ah, the back button. You might imagine "back" fires a JavaScript event which you could simply cancel like so: document.onHistoryGo = function() { return false; } No so. There simply is no such event. If you really do have a web app (as opposed to just a web site with some ajaxy features) it's reasonable to take over the back button (with fragments on the ...


46

They're probably looking for enums. Before Java 1.5 introduced language support for enums, standard practice was to define a set of public static final ints as enum values. This pattern can be seen all over Swing. Many of these constants are defined in interfaces so that classes can implement the interface and use the constants without a qualifying ...


44

This is pretty funny - the Google references point to articles on "interview questions" that obviously fed off each other (probably from Googling as well :-) ). The original author made a "typo" and wrote "baller" and "balling" instead of "caller" and "calling". -) Google results propogated it from there.


42

The most obvious pattern I can think of around that is iterating via Iterable<T> and Iterator<T>, which is now available as a feature via the enhanced for-each loop.


41

See the code from pjax. pjax is fairly popular open source library now, so the below logic might be the best to avoid this issue. var popped = ('state' in window.history), initialURL = location.href $(window).bind('popstate', function(event) { // Ignore inital popstate that some browsers fire on page load var initialPop = !popped && ...


39

On older machines, codes smaller than 8 bits were fairly common, but most of those have been dead and gone for years now. C and C++ have mandated a minimum of 8 bits for char, at least as far back as the C89 standard. [Edit: For example, C90, §5.2.4.2.1 requires CHAR_BIT >= 8 and UCHAR_MAX >= 255. C89 uses a different section number (I believe that would be ...


38

Excerpt from an interview with Ken Thompson (9-6-89): Every time we made a directory, by convention we put it in another directory called directory - directory, which was dd. Its name was dd and that all the users directories and in fact most other directories, users maintain their own directory systems, had pointers back to dd, and dd ...


38

Some canonized design patterns -- Adapter, Factory, Command, Visitor, etc -- are approximations of features which are baked into other languages. Off the top of my head: Event-handlers in C# are baked-in versions of the observer pattern. Think about how you'd wire up events in C# if you had to roll your own observer each time. Visitor pattern is a verbose ...


38

The name "C sharp" was inspired from musical notation where a sharp indicates that the written note should be made a half-step higher in pitch.[6] This is similar to the language name of C++, where "++" indicates that a variable should be incremented by 1. The sharp symbol also resembles a ligature of four "+" symbols (in a two-by-two grid), further ...


38

Try this: $ history | cut -c 8-


37

Because: In mathematics, √x commonly, unless otherwise specified, refers to the principal (i.e. positive) root of x [http://mathworld.wolfram.com/SquareRoot.html]. Some languages don't have the ability to return more than one value. Since you can just apply negation, returning both would be redundant.


37

Fortran is still in active use every day in the scientific community. Fortran has some advantages that make it uniquely attractive: Its pretty easy to learn. Most scientists like myself don't have computer science degrees but still find themselves writing code more than anything else. The design of the language is well suited to translating ...


36

I believe it stands for "Remark", that is, a comment. From the MSDN site: Used to include explanatory remarks in the source code of a program.


36

YGL's answer is the right one for log, see this thread: The hint from "hg help log" might be: "If no revision range is specified, the default is tip:0". Combine this with the knowlegde from "hg help multirevs". That is: hg log -r : multirevs: When Mercurial accepts more than one revision, they may be specified individually, or provided as a ...



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