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579

Because that’s how the POSIX standard defines a line: 3.206 Line A sequence of zero or more non- <newline> characters plus a terminating <newline> character. There's at least one hard advantage to this guideline when working on a terminal emulator: All Unix tools expect this convention and work with it. For instance, when ...


351

I will try to remember what I said, but none of the answers so far are correct (every one of them was done in the 60s and 70s before the commercialization of PCs in the 80s). However, we could start all over and try to think of new inventions in computing since the 1980s.


202

Each line should be terminated in a newline character, including the last one. Some programs have problems processing the last line of a file if it isn't newline terminated. GCC warns about it not because it can't process the file, but because it has to as part of the standard. The C language standard says A source file that is not empty shall end ...


142

Disclaimer: I am a Dojo committer, but this is my personal view as a JavaScript insider. First of all: the graph is absolutely and completely incorrect. Look at the chart link closely, and read "events". This is the list of events "related" to Dojo: "Declaring Dojo for Ajax" — ok, it may be relevant. "IT Dojo: Stop programs from running when Windows ...


130

I'm going to disagree with the trend here. I'll go on record: I do not agree that DBNull serves any useful purpose; it adds unnecessary confusion, while contributing virtually no value. The argument is often put forward that null is an invalid reference, and that DBNull is a null object pattern; neither is true. For example: int? x = null; this is ...


125

Use the --reverse option: git log --reverse


113

Many Python web frameworks already existed when Django appeared in 2005 -- indeed, the joke was already going around, by then, that Python is "the language with more web frameworks than keywords" (and Guido rejected my proposal to fix that in Py3k by adding many, many more keywords). Now "django" per se is a bit ambiguous as a search term (it's also the name ...


107

I think there were a few factors, the combination of which was greater than the sum of their individual weights. One is simply timing: Django appeared right as the first big wave of Rails hype was ramping up, and so it was immediately portrayed as being sort of "Python's answer to Rails". That resulted in a not-insignificant number of eyeballs on the ...


106

There's many reasons you don't just have a huge number of registers: They're highly linked to most pipeline stages. For starters, you need to track their lifetime, and forward results back to previous stages. The complexity gets intractable very quickly, and the number of wires (literally) involved grows at the same rate. It's expensive on area, which ...


87

I think this will do it for you: location / { try_files $uri /base.html; }


75

IronPython came first and the rest followed. As for why IronPython is called IronPython, Jim Hugunin goes into that in this video (at about 14:00). He says it was partly to avoid calling it Language.NET or Language#, and the idea is that Iron languages are: True language implementations True to the language True to the community True to the experience ...


75

To rewrite the history with the files moved: If you want the project's history to look as though all files have always been in the directory foo/bar, then you need to do a little surgery. Use git filter-branch with the "tree filter" to rewrite the commits so that anywhere foo/bar doesn't exist, it is created and all files are moved to it: git filter-branch ...


75

Try this: $ history | cut -c 8-


72

It comes from the history of using integer values as booleans. If x is an int, but I am using it as a boolean as per if(x)... then incrementing will mean that whatever its truth value before the operation, it will have a truth-value of true after it (barring overflow). However, it's impossible to predict the result of -- given knowledge only of the truth ...


71

I can only imagine of sending a value from the server to the client which is (unchanged) sent back to maintain a kind of a state. Precisely. In fact, it's still being used for this purpose today because HTTP as we know it today is still, at least fundamentally, a stateless protocol. This use case was actually first described in HTML 3.2 (I'm surprised ...


69

Quoting an example from git-filter-branch(1) To rewrite the repository to look as if foodir/ has been its project root, and discard all other history: git filter-branch --subdirectory-filter foodir -- --all Thus you can, e.g., turn a library subdirectory into a repository of its own. Note the -- that separates filter-branch options from revision ...


68

this should do it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozilla When users visit a website (via a user agent such as a web browser), a text string is generally sent to identify the user agent to the web server. It is known as the "user agent string". The Netscape web browser identified itself as "Mozilla/" followed by some information about the ...


63

git checkout <commit> <filename>


62

The name "C sharp" was inspired from musical notation where a sharp indicates that the written note should be made a half-step higher in pitch.[6] This is similar to the language name of C++, where "++" indicates that a variable should be incremented by 1. The sharp symbol also resembles a ligature of four "+" symbols (in a two-by-two grid), further implying ...


62

tl;dr "Foo" and "bar" as metasyntactic variables were popularised by MIT and DEC, the first references are in work on LISP and PDP-1 and Project MAC from 1964 onwards. Many of these people were in MIT's Tech Model Railroad Club, where we find the first documented use of "foo" in tech circles in 1959 (and a variant in 1958). Both "foo" and "bar" (and even ...


57

Yes, take a look, this will give you the 50 most recent executed SQL statements sql 2005 and up only SELECT TOP 50 * FROM(SELECT COALESCE(OBJECT_NAME(s2.objectid),'Ad-Hoc') AS ProcName, execution_count,s2.objectid, (SELECT TOP 1 SUBSTRING(s2.TEXT,statement_start_offset / 2+1 , ( (CASE WHEN statement_end_offset = -1 THEN (LEN(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(...


54

This answer is an attempt at a technical answer rather than opinion. If we want to be POSIX purists, we define a line as: A sequence of zero or more non- <newline> characters plus a terminating <newline> character. Source: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/V1_chap03.html#tag_03_206 An incomplete line as: A sequence of ...


53

On older machines, codes smaller than 8 bits were fairly common, but most of those have been dead and gone for years now. C and C++ have mandated a minimum of 8 bits for char, at least as far back as the C89 standard. [Edit: For example, C90, §5.2.4.2.1 requires CHAR_BIT >= 8 and UCHAR_MAX >= 255. C89 uses a different section number (I believe that would be ...


52

It may be related to the difference between: text file (each line is supposed to end in an end-of-line) binary file (there are no true "lines" to speak of, and the length of the file must be preserved) If each line does end in an end-of-line, this avoids, for instance, that concatenating two text files would make the last line of the first run into the ...


52

Please have a try with git log --follow on your file. I learn from here Is it possible to move/rename files in git and maintain their history?


49

As Trey Jackson said, you want to put this: (savehist-mode 1) in your Emacs start up file, then restart Emacs. (Calling it interactively will stomp on your current mini-buffer history, so you may not want to do that.) It's also worth pointing out that you can persist other variables across sessions by adding them to savehist-additional-variables, like so:...


49

if (window.history && window.history.pushState) See also this All-In-One Almost-Alphabetical No-Bullshit Guide to Detecting Everything


49

How to: Find a Changeset in Visual Studio 2010: In Source Control Explorer, on the File menu, point to Source Control, and then click Find Changesets. For some reason newer versions of the article are in a different location. Here are links to newer versions of the article: How to: Find a Changeset in Visual Studio 2012 How to: Find a Changeset in Visual ...


47

You can use svn log -l5 -v <URL of your repository>. svn info can be used to get the root URL for the repository where your working copy is connected to.


46

They're probably looking for enums. Before Java 1.5 introduced language support for enums, standard practice was to define a set of public static final ints as enum values. This pattern can be seen all over Swing. Many of these constants are defined in interfaces so that classes can implement the interface and use the constants without a qualifying ...



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