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38

Although it is possible to use INSERT OVERWRITE to get data out of Hive, it might not be the best method for your particular case. First let me explain what INSERT OVERWRITE does, then I'll describe the method I use to get tsv files from Hive tables. According to the manual, your query will store the data in a directory in HDFS. The format will not be csv. ...


14

According to the LanguageManual, you can use unix_timestamp() to get the "current time stamp using the default time zone." If you need to convert that to something more human-readable, you can use from_unixtime(unix_timestamp()). Hope that helps.


13

You can update a Hive partition by, for example: ALTER TABLE logs PARTITION(year = 2012, month = 12, day = 18) SET LOCATION 'hdfs://user/darcy/logs/2012/12/18'; This command does not move the old data, nor does it delete the old data. It simply sets the partition to the new location. To drop a partition, you can do ALTER TABLE logs DROP IF EXISTS ...


13

You need to explode only once (in conjunction with LATERAL VIEW). After exploding you can use a new column (called prod_and_ts in my example) which will be of struct type. Then, you can resolve the product_id and timestamps members of this new struct column to retrieve the desired result. SELECT user_id, prod_and_ts.product_id as product_id, ...


9

The property of interest here is javax.jdo.option.ConnectionURL. The default value of this property is jdbc:derby:;databaseName=metastore_db;create=true. This value specifies that you will be using embedded derby as your Hive metastore and the location of the metastore is metastore_db. Also the metastore will be created if it doesn't already exist. Note ...


8

Let's assume you have the following table: describe test; name string ph string category map<string,int> select * from test; name ph category Name1 ph1 {"type":1000,"color":200,"shape":610} Name2 ph2 {"type":2000,"color":200,"shape":150} Name3 ph3 {"type":3000,"color":700,"shape":167} Accessing the map column : ...


8

This page mentions the command SHOW DATABASES. From the manual: SHOW (DATABASES|SCHEMAS) [LIKE identifier_with_wildcards]; SHOW DATABASES lists all of the databases defined in the metastore. The optional LIKE clause allows the list of databases to be filtered using a regular expression. Wildcards in the regular expression can only be '' for any ...


7

You cannot add a column with a default value in Hive. You have the right syntax for adding the column ALTER TABLE test1 ADD COLUMNS (access_count1 int);, you just need to get rid of default sum(max_count). No changes to that files backing your table will happen as a result of adding the column. Hive handles the "missing" data by interpreting NULL as the ...


7

To get this you can use hive's property which is TBLPROPERTIES ("skip.header.line.count"="1") you can also refer example - CREATE TABLE TEMP (NAME STRING, ID INT) ROW FORMAT DELIMITED FIELDS TERMINATED BY '\t' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n' TBLPROPERTIES("skip.header.line.count"="1");


6

Try with following coding... Select * into tmp_combined from ( SELECT b.var1 FROM tmp_table1 b UNION ALL SELECT c.var1 FROM tmp_table2 c UNION ALL SELECT d.var1 FROM tmp_table3 d UNION ALL SELECT e.var1 FROM tmp_table4 e UNION ALL SELECT f.var1 FROM tmp_table5 f UNION ALL SELECT g.var1 FROM tmp_table6 g ...


6

You can do the same with a LEFT OUTER JOIN in Hive: SELECT A.id FROM A LEFT OUTER JOIN B ON (B.id = A.id) WHERE B.id IS null


5

How about: where unix_timestamp() - created < 180 * 24 * 60 * 60 Date math is usually simplest if you can just do it with the actual timestamp values. Or do you want it to only cut off on whole days? Then I think the problem is with how you are converting back and forth between ints and strings. Try: where created > ...


5

That is some odd behavior assuming col_a and col_b are both ints. The literal 0 is of course an int, and according the wiki tutorial division "Gives the result of dividing B from A. The type of the result is the same as the common parent(in the type hierarchy) of the types of the operands. If the operands are integer types, then the result is the quotient of ...


5

Missing replicas should be self-healing over time. However, if you're wanting to move them to lost+found, you can use: hadoop fsck / -move Or delete them with: hadoop fsck / -delete If you just want to identify the files with under-replicated blocks, use: hadoop fsck / -files -blocks -locations That will give you lots of detail, including the list ...


5

This might be because there's another process (maybe another hiveserver) already listening on port 10000. Issue netstat -ntulp | grep ':10000' to see it that is the case and kill the process listed there or start Thrift server on another port, e.g: hive --service hiveserver -p 10001


5

You can use create table tablename as in Hive. example: create table people1990 as select * from people where dob_year=1990


5

You can use the numeric_range and array_index UDFs from Brickhouse ( http://github.com/klout/brickhouse ) to solve this problem. There is an informative blog posting describing in detail over at http://brickhouseconfessions.wordpress.com/2013/03/07/exploding-multiple-arrays-at-the-same-time-with-numeric_range/ Using those UDFs, the query would be something ...


4

EDIT - PART 1 Okay - For some reason I am going to explain myself - so to start with I stumbled upon this question because of the SQL tag, and saw Hive, and started to not look and just skip it. BUT then I noticed it had been over a day and you had gotten no answers. I looked - I saw a SQL logic correction in the original query posted that I knew would be ...


4

Subqueries inside a WHERE clause are not supported in Hive: https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/Hive/LanguageManual+SubQueries However, often you can use a JOIN statement instead to get to the same result: https://karmasphere.com/hive-queries-on-table-data#join_syntax For example, this query: SELECT a.KEY, a.value FROM a WHERE a.KEY IN ...


4

Looks like your format has three millisecond digits. I'd guess that, according to the SimpleDateFormat, you would need to use the following: from_unixtime(unix_timestamp('20130502081559999', 'yyyyMMddHHmmssSSS')) Hope that helps.


4

Try these steps : Open HWI : http://localhost:9999/hwi/index.jsp Click on Authorize in the left pane. This will open the Change User Info section. Enter the username and hit submit to complete the authorization process. Upon successful authorization you'll see Authorization is complete at the top of your page. Now click on Create Session, enter some ...


4

If you want to work with milliseconds, don't use the unix timestamp functions because these consider date as seconds since epoch. hive> describe function extended unix_timestamp; unix_timestamp([date[, pattern]]) - Returns the UNIX timestamp Converts the current or specified time to number of seconds since 1970-01-01. Instead, convert the JDBC ...


4

You can use the table generating function stack to insert literal values into a table. First you need a dummy table which contains only one line. You can generate it with the help of limit. CREATE TABLE one AS SELECT 1 AS one FROM any_table_in_your_database LIMIT 1; Now you can create a new table with literal values like this: CREATE TABLE my_table AS ...


4

You can do a describe extended which will show you everything about your table, including the serde properties you mentioned. For example for your table: $ hive -e "describe extended foo" Detailed Table Information Table(tableName:foo, dbName:default, owner:cloudera, createTime:1383250992, lastAccessTime:0, retention:0, ...


4

Figured this would end up being something trivial/inane and it was in the end. Setting mapred.child.java.opts thusly: SET mapred.child.java.opts="-Xmx4G -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC"; is unacceptable. But this seem to go through fine: SET mapred.child.java.opts=-Xmx4G -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC; (minus the double-quotes) sigh. Having better debug options/error ...


4

create external table new_db.table like old_db.table location '(path of file in hdfs file)'; if you have partition in table then you have to add partition in new_db.table.


4

create external table new_db.table like old_db.table location '(path of file in hdfs file)'; if you have partition in table then you have to add partition in new_db.table.


3

You can use a non-equijoin. If your SQL supports between, use select t1.integer_val, t2.corr_value from t1 left outer join t2 on t1.integer_val between t2.range_min and t2.range_max Otherwise, use select t1.integer_val, t2.corr_value from t1 left outer join t2 on t1.integer_val >= t2.range_min and t1.integer_val <= t2.range_max Here is a ...


3

You'd currently need a JDBC StorageHandler, which one has not been created just yet, but you could certain build your own. There is currently an issue report for this which you can follow here: https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/HIVE-1555


3

Probably not the best solution but at least it does the job: use WHERE to define the matching condition instead of ON() (that is now forced to TRUE) select users.nb, prefix.area from users LEFT OUTER JOIN prefix ON(true) WHERE instr(users.nb,prefmap.prefix)=1 It's not perfect as it's a bit slow. It creates as many temporary (useless) entries ...



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