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It depends on where you are accesing the object from, check to see which user you are logged in as SQL> SHOW USER This will show which user you are logged in as, if you are in OPS$E64ADM, the directly query using SQL> select * from SAPUSER; if show user show anyother user you need privilege to access it from other users, can ask dba or if you ...


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who are you signed in as? unless it's the owner of the table you will need to change your code to include the owner ie. select * from OPS$E64ADM.SAPUSER


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From The GNU Awk guide - 7.1.4.2 Input/Output from BEGIN and END Rules Traditionally, due largely to implementation issues, $0 and NF were undefined inside an END rule. The POSIX standard specifies that NF is available in an END rule. It contains the number of fields from the last input record. Most probably due to an oversight, the standard does ...


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END means "execute the given block after the file has been processed", there is no data to print associated to it. If you want to process the last line, save each line in a variable in a default block and then process the variable in the end block. awk '{ last_line = $0; } END { /* do something with last_line */}' file Or use tail before feeding data to ...


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AIX AIX doesn't have any commands that will output the IPC limits that you're looking for, unfortunately. At least none that I've ever found... I generally refer to this table and assume the lowest common denominator for the versions of AIX that I'm supporting. If I was needing to programmatically detect limits in the shell, I'd just write a wrapper ...


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Trial and error The simplest and more robust method is to probe if you can allocate these resources, i.e.: int shmid = shmget(key, LARGE_BUFFER_SIZE, 0644 | IPC_CREAT); void* data = shmat(shmid, NULL, 0); if (data == (char *)(-1)) { /* Log an error and exit */ } I.e. Oracle Database does that. Linux On Linux these limits are handled via sysctl: $ ...



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