Hot answers tagged

8

You can get all the children of an HTML::Element object using the content_list method, so all the child nodes of the first <ul> element in the document would be use HTML::TreeBuilder; my $tree = HTML::TreeBuilder->new_from_file('my.html'); my @items = $tree->look_down(_tag => 'ul')->content_list; But it is far more expressive to use ...


8

Try using a pattern instead of a string, i.e., $tree->look_down( 'class' => qr/^(?:postbody|postprofile)$/)


6

Your code is overcomplicated, and you employ utf8::all and decode manually and call that strange method all at once. Rhetorically asking, what do you expect to achieve that way? I do not have the patience to find out the details what goes wrong and where, especially since you did not post any input with which your program fails to do the expected, so I ...


4

You need to process each table separately, same for rows: foreach my $table ( $tree->findnodes('//table') ) { foreach my $row ( $table->findnodes('.//tr') ) { my @cells = $row->findvalues('.//td'); print join("\t", @cells), "\n"; } print "\n"; } Of course this is solution only for simple tables (think about ...


4

There are a couple of mistakes. Repairs: # list context my @nodes = $tree->findnodes( q{//a} # just a string, not a string containings quotes ); # iterate over array for my $node (@nodes) {


3

If you need text, xmllint --html --format (comes with libxml2) does a decent job. If you want a tree and mess with it and test out various expressions in a GUI, then Xacobeo is your new best friend. Note: since both those tools rely on libxml, replace HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath with HTML::TreeBuilder::LibXML for compatibility. Evaluating XPath will be ...


3

If you want to use the look_down method you can add an extra criteria to get only the children: my @li_elements = $ul->look_down(_tag => 'li', sub {$_[0]->parent() == $ul});


3

The simplest way is to use the attr method to extract the contents of the value attribute, and the map function to loop over all the elements. my @values = map { $_->attr('value') } @juice;


3

To quote the docs: If LWP is unable to fetch the URL, or the response is not HTML (as determined by content_is_html in HTTP::Headers), then new_from_url dies, and the HTTP::Response object is found in $HTML::TreeBuilder::lwp_response. Try this: use strict; use warnings; use HTML::TreeBuilder 5; # need new_from_url use Try::Tiny; my ...


3

the script simply exits No, it throws an exception. You could always catch the exception with eval BLOCK if you so desired. my $tree = eval { HTML::TreeBuilder->new_from_url($url) } or warn($@);


3

You have a badly installed version of Scalar::Util. (It's might not be your fault; some distros have done this.) Reinstall Scalar::Util first. $ cpan Scalar::Util Or if it complains Scalar::Util is up to date. $ cpan cpan> force test Scalar::Util cpan> force install Scalar::Util # Only do this if the tests were successful!! cpan> quit


3

The HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath module allows much more convenient access to the HTML nodes in the document. Take a look at this program for example. It seems to do what you need. use strict; use warnings; use HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath; my $tree = HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath->new_from_file('anon.html'); for my $table ($tree->findnodes('//table')) { my ...


3

You might want to look on guts method in HTML::Tree. It returns only non-implicit nodes as a list.


2

If you can ensure your HTML is XHTML-compliant, that is, it's a proper XML document, you may be able to use XML tools to do the job instead. In the past, I've used XML::Twig for this type of job, it was a bit easier that way. Of course, if you're parsing arbitrary web pages from the internet, you may not have this type of guarantee.


2

The problem is that you have \n both at the start and at the end of the regex. Consider something like this: $s = 'abababa'; $s =~ s/aba/axa/g; that will set $s to axabaxa, not axaxaxa, because there are only two non-overlapping occurrences of aba.


2

It appears to be doing every other one. My guess is that your records have a single \n between them, but your pattern starts and ends with a \n. So the final \n on the first match consumes the \n that the second match needed to find the second record. The net result is that it picks up every other record. You might be better off wrapping your pattern in ^ ...


2

Take that / off the end of that XPath. .//*[@id="price_amount"] should do. As it is, it's not valid XPath.


2

Assuming that $address never contains more than one <span> with either of the given values for the itemprop attribute, you could write this for my $span ( $address->look_down(_tag => 'span') ) { my $itemprop = $span->attr('itemprop'); $values{Pcity} = $span->as_text if $itemprop eq 'addressLocality'; $values{PState} = ...


2

Line 33 stores $course-$option as a key in the hash, with 1 as its associated value. Why? Hashes provide a convenient and quick mechanism for lookups. Those values could instead have been stored in an array, but subsequent lookups (to test whether a given key has been seen before) would not be nearly as quick. Line 45 is a syntactically dense statement, but ...


2

Your HTML is invalid. And given that HTML::TreeBuilder is a subclass of HTML::Parser, I can only assume that the parser is doing what it can to transform your document into valid HTML. You can call $parsedPage->as_HTML to see what the parser has done to your HTML. It gives me this: ...


1

Jambo, I am not trying to be rude, but please read the manual. I added links to your question. I am going to assume that you did not read the docs because you were unable to find them. Let's address that issue: How to Find the Docs You Need Online: search.cpan.org is a main website used to search for CPAN modules and their documentation. Many things ...


1

Your use of HTML::TreeBuilder for parsing HTML is very good. You're running into a problem though because you also want information from inside a <script> tag with contains JavaScript. Unfortunately, the above module isn't going to help you beyond isolating the JS. Given the simplicity of your goal, I believe that I'd just use a regex to find the ...


1

The following fetches the HTML content for each URL in mash.txt, retrieves all values across all options, and pushes them into a single array. The resultant array is then passed to input.template, and the processed output is written to output.html: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use LWP::UserAgent; use HTML::TreeBuilder; use Template; my ...


1

You'll want to use the extract_links() method, not look_down(): use strict; use warnings; use LWP::Simple; use HTML::Tree; my %seen; my $url = 'http://www.stephenfry.com/'; my $doc = get($url); my $adt = HTML::Tree->new(); $adt->parse($doc); my $links_array_ref = $adt->extract_links('a'); my @links = grep { /www.stephenfry.com/ and !$seen{$_}++ ...


1

First check the latest version of the module HTML::TreeBuilder. Try to install it from cpan. cpan -i HTML::TreeBuilder


1

use Web::Query qw(); join '', Web::Query->new_from_html($html)->find('.getme > *')->html returns the string <h2>Some Header</h2><div class="another"><p>More text</div><div class="yetanother">text text text</div>


1

Accessing text nodes of the HTML tree is made much easier if you call the objectify_text method on the tree. This changes the text nodes from simple strings to instances of HTML::Element with a pseudo tag name of ~text and an attribute called text equal to the text string. This allows the look_down method to search for text nodes. If you recode like this ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible