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24

The only way I'm aware of is the trick used by FileSaver.js: Create a hidden <a> tag. Set its href attribute to the blob's URL. Set its download attribute to the filename. Click on the <a> tag. Here is a simplified example (jsfiddle): var saveData = (function () { var a = document.createElement("a"); document.body.appendChild(a); ...


20

For me, at least on Mac OSX, they're stored under /Users/USERNAME/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/Default/File System for me. If you're using profiles, there will be profile directories instead of Default. However, each origin's saved files/folders are obfuscated under directories that won't be easy for you to interact with. For debugging the ...


16

If you want to inline file contents from fs.readFileSync() calls, you can use brfs: var fs = require('fs'); var src = fs.readFileSync(__dirname + '/file.txt'); then do: browserify -t brfs main.js > bundle.js and src will be set to the contents of file.txt at compile time.


13

Just for completeness: on linux it goes into ~/.config/google-chrome/Default/File\ System/


12

On Windows XP, it is here: c:\Documents and Settings\USERNAME\Local Settings\Application Data\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default\File System\. On Windows 7, the location is C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default\File System. It's not very useful to browse it because file and dir names are obfuscated (but content in files is ...


9

To read the content of a directory : fs.root.getDirectory('Documents', {}, function(dirEntry){ var dirReader = dirEntry.createReader(); dirReader.readEntries(function(entries) { for(var i = 0; i < entries.length; i++) { var entry = entries[i]; if (entry.isDirectory){ console.log('Directory: ' + entry.fullPath); } ...


8

You need to call: fileEntry.getMetadata(function(metadata) { alert(metadata.size); // or do something more useful with it... }); See the specifications for the filesystem Entry interface and Metadata interface for details.


7

Only chrome supports requestFileSystem as the webkitRequestFileSystem version. None of the other browsers (FF6, IE9, Op11) support this


6

var i = document.createElement("input"); if (typeof i.multiple !== 'undefined') { // supports multiple }


6

Looks like DirectoryEntry#removeRecursively does that. It says you can't remove the root of a file system, but you could loop through the entries in the root and remove them recursively (or just always work with a subdirectory of the root, thereby letting you remove that with a one-liner).


6

use something like: function exists(fileName, callback) { storageRootEntry.getFile(fileName, {create : false}, function() { callback(true); }, function() { callback(false); }); } where storageRootEntry is correctly initialized root directory. The function will returns "true" if file exists and ...


5

Firefox doesn't support writing files via File API yet and even when this will be added it will probably be accessible to web pages only and not extensions. In other words: yes, if you absolutely need to write to files then you should use low-level APIs. You want to store your data in the user profile directory (there is no extension directory, your ...


5

Here's a quasi-educated guess: Looking at the definition of the HTML5 File interface shows that a File is a Blob and that the size attribute is actually part of the Blob interface. Since a Blob is an abstraction over a raw chunk of data, accessing the size attribute might actually cause the implementation to load the whole file into memory. You could ...


5

Nevermind, I just found it. For anyone looking, it's in (on my windows 7 machine at least) C:\Users\ user \AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default\File System Also note that this was in Chrome 11, in Chrome 13 there were some changes to the FileSystem (probably for security) that make it very difficult to find specific files by scrolling through the ...


5

Maybe this is a solution for your problem: function isInputDirSupported() { var tmpInput = document.createElement('input'); if ('webkitdirectory' in tmpInput || 'mozdirectory' in tmpInput || 'odirectory' in tmpInput || 'msdirectory' in tmpInput || 'directory' in tmpInput) return true; return false; }


5

I was having the same issues and someone posted the solution, found at filesystem-api-not-working-in-chrome-v27-v29 navigator.webkitPersistentStorage.requestQuota(1024*1024, function(gB){ window.requestFileSystem(PERSISTENT, gB, onInitFs, errorHandler); }, function(e){ console.log('Error', e); }) You have to remove the PERSISTENT from ...


5

Yes, but you will need some kind of server backend to handle the Amazon API keys in a more secure way if you are going to make it part of a public website. You can find what looks like a complete example implementation of this these projects: s3-multipart-upload-browser which uses a PHP backend s3_multipart which uses Ruby. Please note that I have not ...


4

when you try using new web-technology please check caniuse.com for browser support - in this case http://caniuse.com/fileapi tells you everything you need to know ;)


4

Have you tried using chrome.fileSystem.chooseEntry? This API lets your app save files to the user's hard disk, wherever they want, letting your program have a Save As kind of command. This is a bit different to a download link, but is also more in harmony with V2 apps being like native apps. chrome.fileSystem pops up a dialog asking the user to choose a ...


4

var _fileuploadcontrolId = document.getElementById("id"); _fileuploadcontrolId.value = ""; _fileuploadcontrolId.focus();


4

The error message tells you to use navigator.webkitTemporaryStorage or navigator.webkitPersistentStorage and you try to use navigator.webkitStorageInfo which is undefined. UPDATE: PERSISTENT should not be passed to navigator.webkitTemporaryStorage or navigator.webkitPersistentStorage but only to window.webkitRequestFileSystem. Then there is no more error. ...


4

By using either a[download], msSaveOrOpenBlob, or Adobe Flash SWF Filewriter, depending on which method is supported by the browser. PS: MEGA doesn't always use HTML5 FileSystem API. They have various techniques that they use depending on the browser support. In Firefox 20+, for example, they will store the data temporarily to the IndexedDB storage, before ...


4

I think your problem might be here: The application has been only tested locally (i.e. just open the html file with Chrome). When you're running on the file:/// protocol you don't get the same privileges as with http/s:/// I would try running it through a web server if I were you.


4

You can't get access to any file you want, you can only access files that the user has chosen through chrome.fileSystem.chooseEntry. If that doesn't work for some reason, explain exactly you're trying to accomplish (e.g. are you saving an ini file?) and we might be able to suggest a different solution.


3

Replace function(){...} with console.log.bind(console), and you will find out. > window.webkitStorageInfo.queryUsageAndQuota(webkitStorageInfo.PERSISTENT, console.log.bind(console)) undefined // Return value of ^ 0 0 // Printed results, argument 0 and argument 1 The explanation of the callback is found here: interface StorageInfo { .... ...


3

There's indeed little information on this subject at the moment, so I put together an example that combines: Using the webkitdirectory attribute on <input type="file">. This allows the user to select a directory using an appropriate dialog box. Using the Filesystem API. This is about the sandboxed filesystem which allows you to store files on the ...


3

Ok, so you're using something like: <input type="file" id="file-input" webkitdirectory="" directory=""> This lets the user upload a directory. Roughly speaking, here's the code to get the list of files uploaded: query("#file-input").on.change.add((e) { print(e.target.files); }); It sounds like you already figured that part out. Really, you ...


3

This is the full definition of origin in HTML5, which refers to RFC 6454. The significant bit as far as you're concerned is: If the two origins are scheme/host/port triples, the two origins are the same if, and only if, they have identical schemes, hosts, and ports. It's true that this won't let you browse the file system from JavaScript but if ...


3

From this article on HTML5 Rocks: It's important to remember that this file system is sandboxed, meaning one web app cannot access another app's files. This also means you cannot read/write files to an arbitrary folder on the user's hard drive (for example My Pictures, My Documents, etc.). The FileSystem API was designed to allow your app to create and ...


3

You will always need to request a FileSystem, if that's what you need. To use the same one each time use a PERSISTENT type when requesting the file system. window.requestFileSystem = window.requestFileSystem || window.webkitRequestFileSystem; window.requestFileSystem(window.PERSISTENT, size, successCallback, opt_errorCallback); There are other local ...



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