Hot answers tagged

1438

A clear explanation from Daniel Irvine: There's a problem with 401 Unauthorized, the HTTP status code for authentication errors. And that’s just it: it’s for authentication, not authorization. Receiving a 401 response is the server telling you, “you aren’t authenticated–either not authenticated at all or authenticated incorrectly–but please ...


894

For a PUT request: HTTP 200 or HTTP 204 should imply "resource updated successfully". For a DELETE request: HTTP 200 or HTTP 204 should imply "resource deleted successfully". HTTP 202 can also be returned which would imply that the instruction was accepted by the server and the "resource was marked for deletion". 9.6 PUT If an existing resource is ...


495

Short answer: for both PUT and DELETE, you should send either 200 (OK) or 204 (No Content). Long answer: here's a complete decision diagram (click to magnify).


375

For input validation failure: 400 Bad Request + your optional description. This is suggested in the book "RESTful Web Services". For double submit: 409 Conflict Update June 2014 The relevant specification used to be RFC2616, which gave the use of 400 (Bad Request) rather narrowly as The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed ...


220

See the RFC: 401 Unauthorized: If the request already included Authorization credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. 403 Forbidden: The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Update From your use case, it appears that the user is not authenticated. I would ...


206

Failed validation: 403 Forbidden ("The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it"). Contrary to popular opinion, RFC2616 doesn't say "403 is only intended for failed authentication", but "403: I know what you want, but I won't do that". That condition may or may not be due to authentication. Trying to add a duplicate: 409 Conflict ("The ...


200

This will return the int value: response.getStatusLine().getStatusCode()


188

Here's an example: @GET @Path("retrieve/{uuid}") public Response retrieveSomething(@PathParam("uuid") String uuid) { if(uuid == null || uuid.trim().length() == 0) { return Response.serverError().entity("UUID cannot be blank").build(); } Entity entity = service.getById(uuid); if(entity == null) { return ...


146

Something the other answers are missing is that it must be understood that Authentication and Authorization in the context of HTTP/1.1 refers only to HTTP authentication protocols based on the challenge-response headers WWW-Authenticate and Authorization (or another response header defined by an IANA registered authentication scheme), as made clear by ...


140

400 Bad Request would now seem to be the best HTTP status code for your use case. At the time of your question (and my original answer), RFC 7231 was not a thing; at which point I objected to 400 Bad Request because RFC 2616 said (with emphasis mine): The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax. and the request you ...


137

The items with code "200 (cache)" were fulfilled directly from your browser cache, meaning that the original requests for the items were returned with headers indicating that the browser could cache them (e.g. future-dated Expires or Cache-Control: max-age headers), and that at the time you triggered the new request, those cached objects were still stored in ...


135

Status 422 seems most appropiate based on the spec. The 422 (Unprocessable Entity) status code means the server understands the content type of the request entity (hence a 415(Unsupported Media Type) status code is inappropriate), and the syntax of the request entity is correct (thus a 400 (Bad Request) status code is ...


128

If "validation failure" means that there is some client error in the request, then use HTTP 400 (Bad Request). For instance if the URI is supposed to have an ISO-8601 date and you find that it's in the wrong format or refers to February 31st, then you would return an HTTP 400. Ditto if you expect well-formed XML in an entity body and it fails to parse. ...


117

I did not know the answer so asked the ASP.NET team here. So the trick is to change the signature to HttpResponseMessage and use Request.CreateResponse. [ResponseType(typeof(User))] public HttpResponseMessage GetUser(HttpRequestMessage request, int userId, DateTime lastModifiedAtClient) { var user = new DataEntities().Users.First(p => p.Id == ...


111

Maybe something like this... try { // ... } catch (WebException ex) { if (ex.Status == WebExceptionStatus.ProtocolError) { var response = ex.Response as HttpWebResponse; if (response != null) { Console.WriteLine("HTTP Status Code: " + (int)response.StatusCode); } else { // ...


104

The getcode() method (Added in python2.6) returns the HTTP status code that was sent with the response, or None if the URL is no HTTP URL. >>> a=urllib.urlopen('http://www.google.com/asdfsf') >>> a.getcode() 404 >>> a=urllib.urlopen('http://www.google.com/') >>> a.getcode() 200


99

PHP <=5.3 The header() function has a parameter for status code. If you specify it, the server will take care of it from there. header('HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized', true, 401); PHP >=5.4 See Gajus' answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/14223222/362536


98

I'm not sure there's a set standard, but I would have used 400 Bad Request: The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request without modifications.


96

I recommend status code 422, "Unprocessable Entity".


96

Curl has a specific option, --write-out, for this: $ curl -o /dev/null --silent --head --write-out '%{http_code}\n' <url> 200 -o /dev/null throws away the usual output --silent throws away the progress meter --head makes a HEAD HTTP request, instead of GET --write-out '%{http_code}\n' prints the required status code To wrap this up in a complete ...


90

Under Apache, the limit is a configurable value, LimitRequestLine. Change this value to something larger than its default of 8190 if you want to support a longer request URI. However, note that if you're actually running into this limit, you are probably abusing GET to begin with. You should use POST to transmit this sort of data -- especially since you ...


88

HttpURLConnection: URL url = new URL("http://example.com"); HttpURLConnection connection = (HttpURLConnection)url.openConnection(); connection.setRequestMethod("GET"); connection.connect(); int code = connection.getResponseCode(); This is by no means a robust example; you'll need to handle IOExceptions and whatnot. But it should get you started. If you ...


74

There are several use cases for setting HTTP status codes in a REST web service, and at least one was not sufficiently documented in the existing answers (i.e. when you are using auto-magical JSON/XML serialization using JAXB, and you want to return an object to be serialized, but also a status code different than the default 200). So let me try and ...


72

The approach I have taken is to just throw exceptions from the api controller actions and have an exception filter registered that processes the exception and sets an appropriate response on the action execution context. The filter exposes a fluent interface that provides a means of registering handlers for specific types of exceptions prior to registering ...


70

301: Permanent redirect. Clients making subsequent requests for this resource should use the new URI. Clients should not follow the redirect automatically for POST/PUT/DELETE requests. 302: Redirect for undefined reason. Clients making subsequent requests for this resource should not use the new URI. Clients should not follow the redirect automatically ...


69

First, you need to save the status code in an accessible place. The best to wrap the response with your implementation and keep it there: public class StatusExposingServletResponse extends HttpServletResponseWrapper { private int httpStatus; public StatusExposingServletResponse(HttpServletResponse response) { super(response); } ...


67

According to RFC 2616 (HTTP/1.1) 403 is sent when: The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the ...


66

There is a new function for this in PHP >= 5.4.0 http_response_code Simply do http_response_code(404). If you have a lower PHP version try header(' ', true, 404); (note the whitespace in the string). If you want to set the reason phrase as well try: header('HTTP/ 433 Reason Phrase As You Wish');


66

Since PHP 5.4 you can use http_response_code. http_response_code(404); This will take care of setting the proper HTTP headers. If you are running PHP < 5.4 then you have two options: Upgrade. Use this http_response_code function implemented in PHP.


61

I think atompub REST API is a great example of a restful service. See the snippet below from the atompub spec: POST /edit/ HTTP/1.1 Host: example.org User-Agent: Thingio/1.0 Authorization: Basic ZGFmZnk6c2VjZXJldA== Content-Type: application/atom+xml;type=entry Content-Length: nnn Slug: First Post <?xml version="1.0"?> <entry ...



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