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I'm having the same problem. What I've discovered is that this is hardcoded in Mono. In mcs/class/System/System.Net/HttpConnection.cs, when the constructor of SslServerStream is called, you will notice that the requestClientCertificate is hardcoded to true. I came across this PR that attempts to change this hardcoded value to false, however it's currently ...


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Well, I read like half-way through and stopped at the exception you are getting: A first chance exception of type 'System.IO.FileLoadException' occurred in mscorlib.dll The problem here is that the account that you are using to run the service has limited access to load .Net framework core libraries before it can even perform impersonation. Usually such ...


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If you're here from the future and trying to handle multiple concurrent requests with a single thread using async/await.. public async Task Listen(string prefix, int maxConcurrentRequests, CancellationToken token) { HttpListener listener = new HttpListener(); listener.Prefixes.Add(prefix); listener.Start(); var requests = new ...


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Thanks everyone! I have found the solution. It's all because by default HttpListener can't parse GET-requests with length more than 255 symbols. To solve this problem you need steps: Add to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SYSTEM/CurrentControlSet/services/HTTP/Parameters DWORD (32 bits) key and name it "UrlSegmentMaxLength" and set value = 0. Next you need to restart ...


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Try this instead.. This will use asynchronous coding to ensure that there is no blocking. Blocking means when a thread, sleeps, which is typically how programs tend to "freeze". By using this code, you run non-blocking, which means that its almost impossible to "freeze" the application. public async Task handleClientConnection(HttpListener listener){ ...


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Well. That's because you start to fetch the next context after you have processed the first. Don't do that. Get the next context directly: public void clientConnection(IAsyncResult res){ HttpListener listener = (HttpListener)res.AsyncState; HttpListenerContext context = listener.EndGetContext(res); //tell listener to get the next context ...


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Based on the OPTIONS responses I saw coming back from some other CORS stuff we're doing in IIS, the following worked for me with HttpListener. These values may not be exactly right for you, but should get you going in the right direction. if (request.HttpMethod == "OPTIONS") { response.AddHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Content-Type, Accept, ...



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