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48

Since you already have to implement code to handle a bit-wise layer on top of your byte-organized stream/file, here's my proposal. Do not store the actual frequencies, they're not needed for decoding. You do, however, need the actual tree. So for each node, starting at root: If leaf-node: Output 1-bit + N-bit character/byte If not leaf-node, output ...


19

huffnode_s isn't within itself, only pointers to huffnode_s are in there. Since a pointer is of known size, it's no problem.


17

The next 16 bytes after the 0x10 tell you how many codes of each length. In your example, there are 0 codes of length 1 bit, 1 code of length 2 bits, 2 codes of length 3 bits, 4 codes of length 4 bits, 3 codes of length 5 bits, and so on. These are then followed by the values that are encoded by those codes, in order. Again from your example: Code length ...


13

Collect bits until you have enough bits to fill a byte and then write it.. E.g. something like this: int current_bit = 0; unsigned char bit_buffer; FILE *f; void WriteBit (int bit) { if (bit) bit_buffer |= (1<<current_bit); current_bit++; if (current_bit == 8) { fwrite (&bit_buffer, 1, 1, f); current_bit = 0; bit_buffer ...


13

One way to optimise the binary-tree approach is to use a lookup table. You arrange the table so that you can look up a particular encoded bit-pattern directly, allowing for the maximum possible bit-width of any code. Since most codes don't use the full maximum width, they are included at multiple locations in the table - one location for each combination of ...


11

This. class Huffnode(object): def __init__(self, zero, one, val, freq): """zero and one are Huffnode's, val is a 'char' and freq is a float.""" self.zero = zero self.one = one self.val = val self.freq = freq You can then refactor your various C functions to be methods of this class. Or maybe this. from ...


11

Your aim would be to encourage repeated content. So <p class="foo" id="a">bar</p>...<p class="foo" id="b">bof</p> might indeed be easier to compress than <p id="a" class="foo">bar</p>...<p id="b" class="foo">bof</p>, and both would typically compress easier than <p class="foo" id="a">bar</p>...<p ...


10

I am stunned at the number of responses that imply that such a thing is impossible. Have these people never heard of "compressed file systems", which have been around since before Microsoft was sued in 1993 by Stac Electronics over compressed file system technology? I hear that LZS and LZJB are popular algorithms for people implementing compressed file ...


10

From Wikipedia on the subject: Huffman coding today is often used as a "back-end" to some other compression methods. DEFLATE (PKZIP's algorithm) and multimedia codecs such as JPEG and MP3 have a front-end model and quantization followed by Huffman coding (or variable-length prefix-free codes with a similar structure, although perhaps not necessarily ...


9

No, the smallest amount of data you can write to a file is one byte. You can use a bitset to make manipulating bits easier, then use an ofstream to write to file. If you don't want to use bitset, you can use the bitwise operators to manipulate your data before saving it.


8

Huffman is widely used in all the mainstream compression formats that you might encounter - from GZIP, PKZIP (winzip etc) and BZIP2, to image formats such as JPEG and PNG. All compression schemes have pathological data-sets that cannot be meaningfully compressed; the archive formats I listed above simply 'store' such files uncompressed when they are ...


8

Why not: int counters[256] = {0}; for(int i = 0; i <inString.length(); i++) counters[inString[i]]++; } std::cout << "Count occurences of \'a\'" << counters['a'] << std::endl;


7

If you have enough control over the tree generation, you could make it do a canonical tree (the same way DEFLATE does, for example), which basically means you create rules to resolve any ambiguous situations when building the tree. Then, like DEFLATE, all you actually have to store are the lengths of the codes for each character. That is, if you had the ...


7

In general, about 50% of the incoming symbol stream would have to consist of a given symbol for Huffman to code it as a single bit. The reason for this is that due to how Huffman coding works (the one symbol's encoding cannot be the prefix of another), by encoding a symbol with a single bit, you are requiring that the first bit for every other symbol be the ...


7

Huffman coding is a method that takes symbols (e.g. bytes, DCT coefficients, etc.) and encodes them with variable length codes that are assigned according to statistical probabilities. A frequently-used symbol will be encoded with a code that takes up only a couple bits, while symbols that are rarely used are represented by symbols that take more bits to ...


7

Do you understand the principle of Huffman coding? To put it simply, it is an algorithm used to compress data (like images in your case). This means that the input of the algorithm is an image and the output is a numeric code that is smaller in size than the input: hence the compression. The principle of Huffman coding is (roughly) to replace symbols in ...


7

Restart markers are quite simple. They were designed to allow resynchronization after an error. Since most JPEG images are transmitted over error-free channels, they're rarely needed. A restart interval is defined with the FFDD marker as a 2-byte number. This tells how many MCUs between restart markers. When you encounter a restart marker (FFD0-FFD7), reset ...


7

In a nutshell, Huffman encoding assigns smaller bit-length codes to more probable binary combinations and longer ones to the less probable ones. If all are equally likely, you will find there is no real advantage because the compression due to shorter codes is lost due to equally likely longer codes.


7

Two factors come to my mind: If you have similar probabilities of elements, then little compression will be possible If you try to compress a small input (say, a short text), then the overhead of attaching a Huffman look-up table (aka dictionary - you need to decode your compressed file, don't you?) can make the final size even bigger than the original ...


7

What is the type of merge’s result? If it’s HuffTree, then the merge [t] = [t] line is absurd. If it isn’t, then the makeHuffTree lst = merge leafList line is absurd. The line merge (t1 : t2 : tree) = insTree (makePair t1 t2) tree is absurd either way because tree is a list and insTree is supposed to take a HuffTree, not a list. I am not familiar with the ...


6

You can use an array indexed by character: int counters[256]; for (int i = 0; i < inString.length(); i++) { counters[(unsigned char)inString[i]]++; } You will also want to initialise your counters array to zero, of course.


6

You cannot use a map as the underlying container for a priority_queue: the priority_queue must be free to reorder things in the container, which is not allowed for maps. Only vector and deque can be used (from the standard containers). So, the container type would be something like vector<pair<char, int> >. Then, you need a less/greater ...


6

With DNA sequences you have 4 possible states, namely Guanine (G, 00) Cytosine (C, 01) Adenine (A, 10) Thymine (T, 11) You can use two bits to store those four possible states with the values in brackets. With this simple method you will be able to store four distinct values in one byte. Update As @kol mentioned you could then use practically any ...


6

Just to complete the answer given by david99world: Huffman coding is just a final step in jpeg compression. The important compression comes from the Quantization matrix applied to the DCT. What is this? Well, the DCT transformation is just a way to show image information by frequencies. Instead of having a matrix with pixel values like this: you will ...


6

First of all you do realize the reasoning behind `max(i, j) + splitCost'. Don't you? Basically, if you have one fox, you split it into two and perform each task independently. Let us call this process "merging". Now assume we have three jobs a,b and c such that a>b>c. You can either do merge(merge(a,b),c) or merge(merge(a,c),b) or merge(merge(b,c),a). Do ...


6

First off, you don't need to do what you're doing, since it has already been done for you in zlib, a free compression library that permits commercial use. zlib provides implementations of deflate compression and inflate decompression, per RFC 1951. Also you can use minizip, which is included as a third party contribution in the zlib source code package, or ...


6

The Huffman algorithm in Wikipedia tells you exactly how to create the node tree, so your program can be based on that algorithm, or another like it. Here is a Python program with comments showing the corresponding wikipedia algorithm step. The test data is frequencies of the letters of the alphabet in English text. Once the node tree is created, you need ...


6

You cannot use std::auto_ptr in std::vector. You will need to find an alternative. The problem is that there is no copy in std::auto_ptr. The copy constructor is in some sense a move operation that steals the contents from the original auto pointer and moves it to the new one. That operation requires that the source is a non-const std::auto_ptr (as it ...


6

The posts so far are wrong and misleading: the choice of leaves with equal weights does matter and they do change how well they compress data. Here's a counter example that demonstrates how different choices lead to different compression rates: ABBBCCCDDDDEEEEEEEE A:1, B:3, C:3, D:4, E:8. First step: take A and B to form a node with weight 4. Second step: ...


6

As I had a little bit of time left, I worked out an example of a Huffman tree, while playing with C# 6.0. It's not optimized (not even by far!), but it works fine as an example. And it will help you to look where your 'challenge' may arise. As my English is far better than my Scandinavian knowledge, I used English naming, I hope you don't mind. First, let's ...



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