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20

An Int in Haskell has to support at least a range of [-2^29 .. 2^29-1], but it can also be larger. The exact size will depend on both the compiler you use and the architecture you're on. (You can read more about this in the 2010 Haskell Report, the latest standard for the Haskell language.) With GHC on a 64 bit machine, you will have a range of [-2^63..2^63 ...


15

This is what is known as the n+k pattern. It was disliked in general and was removed from the Haskell2010 spec and GHC no longer enables it by default unlike Hugs which hasn't been updated to the latest spec. It should compile with GHCI with the -XNPlusKPatterns flag enabled. See this for more details.


14

They are all just different implementations. I would try and explain the differences but this article does a much better job.


13

Hugs is being a little bit roundabout here. The actual problem is not the |, but the underscores at the beginning of the constructor names — they aren't allowed to begin with underscores. It's not just a convention that constructors start with a capital letter, but part of Haskell's syntax. My best guess as to what Hugs is "thinking" is that, since your ...


13

It seems that it will soon be fixed in GHCi, see: http://hackage.haskell.org/trac/ghc/ticket/4929


12

Others have said how to solve your immediate problem, but for testing you should be using QuickCheck or some other automated testing library. import Test.QuickCheck prop_5 = add 2 3 == 5 prop_leftIdentity n = add 0 n == n Then run quickCheck prop_5 and quickCheck prop_leftIdentity in your Hugs session. QuickCheck can do a lot more than this, but that will ...


12

First: you want GHC/GHCi. And you want it via the Haskell Platform. Then, for more info on the other implementations of Haskell, read Bartek's link.


10

: is the "cons" operator and constructs a new list whose head is the value to the left of the operator and whose tail is the value to the right of the operator. Thus 0 : [1, 2, 3] is the list [0, 1, 2, 3]. Check the behaviour of this function, by evaluating f 1 0 as follows: f 1 0 = 0 : f 3 1 i.e. f 1 0 is the result of creating a new list consisting of ...


10

You are using a quadratic algorithm: project [] = error "Empty list of points" project [_] = error "Single point is given" project ps = go 10000 ps where go a [_] = a go a (p:ps) = let a2 = min a $ minimum [distance p q | q<-ps] in a2 `seq` go a2 ps You should use a better algorithm. Search computational-geometry tag on ...


8

It is the MonomorphismRestriction at work. Prelude> let f5 = (+) Prelude> :t f5 f5 :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer Prelude> :set -XNoMonomorphismRestriction Prelude> let f5 = (+) Prelude> :t f5 f5 :: Num a => a -> a -> a Because of that, the type synthesizer is forced to default early on some types.


7

Hugs shouldn't do this, but the code is broken anyway so it doesn't matter. Consider: primes = 2 : [ x | x <- [3..], all (\p -> (mod x p) /= 0) primes] How do you determine if 3 is prime? well, does mod 3 2 == 0? No. Does mod 3 ??? == 0? OOPS! What is the next element of primes after two? we don't know, we are trying to compute it. You need to ...


7

the most beginner friendly way is probably the doctest module. Download it with "cabal install doctest", then put your code into a file "Add.hs" and run "doctest Add.hs" from the command line. Your code should look like this, the formatting is important: module Add where -- | add adds two numbers -- -- >>> add 2 3 -- 5 -- >>> add 5 0 -- ...


7

The Integral constraint comes from the exponent of 2. Remember that in Haskell, integer literals are actually polymorphic values of type Num a => a. The compiler then infers that since it's being used as an exponent to (^) :: (Num a, Integral b) => a -> b -> a, it must be of the more constrained type Integral a => a. To save you from having ...


7

When bound without type signature, f2 has a polymorphic inferred type (Fractional a => a), that has to be monomorphised because of the monomorphism restriction (unless that is disabled). In the absence of other default declarations, a type variable with a Fractional constraint defaults to Double. Hugs seems to do the defaulting first, and then choke on ...


7

In haskell 98 this is legal, but it was banned in haskell 2010, and this is what recent versions of GHC implement. Hugs on the other hand was not updated for years, and implements haskell 98. n+k patterns are disliked since there may exist numbers which match for example n+1 but there is no n that would fit that n+1. Consider floating point numbers: There ...


6

Instead of using the GHC api I would suggest binding to Hint for this particular approach, which is just a simplified wrapper around the GHC api. The reason I would recommend this is because the GHC api has a bit of a steep learning curve. But anyway, Like I said In my comment, depending on how deep you want this to go it would require surprisingly few FFI ...


6

GADTs are not implemented in Hugs. Instead, you should use a port of GHC to mips if you are attempting to run code using GADTs. Note that you won't be able to use ghci on all platforms, due to lack of bytecode loading on more exotic architectures.


6

The haskell98 library is deprecated in the Haskell Platform. You should adapt to the haskell2010 standard, which defines rational numbers to be in Data.Ratio.


6

There is a wonderful and brilliant introduction to this topic by Andrew Goldberg and Simon Peyton Jones: http://www.ukuug.org/events/agm2010/ShortestPath.pdf It has helped me to understand the problem, before writing any code at all. It explains Dijkstra's algorithm very well, after which you will find it easy to implement. It also gives all sorts of ...


6

The function occurs compiles fine. However, the expression l = [n..m] is nonsense, unless suitable definitions for n and m already exist. There is a larger issue with your code. Note that elem :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> Bool which is very similar to the type of occurs, especially considering Int is an instance of Eq. Also, the l in your definition of ...


6

You need to save the function in a file (*.hs) and load it via :load <filename>, since the prompt accepts only expressions. 8.5. How do I enter function definitions? The Hugs prompt only accepts expressions for evaluation. You can create a file containing a Haskell module, and load that (see Section 2.2 for details). If you want to ...


6

You can't have let statements at the top level. Simply write fac n = if n == 0 then 1 else n * fac (n-1) m = MetricMeasurement 2 Meter


5

DDP has no data constructor. Try data DDP = DDP [Integer] [Char] [Char] [(Integer,Char,Char,Integer,String)] Integer Char [Integer] -- Note ^^^ Aside: with so many fields, it might pay off to use record syntax instead. I don't know what your type is supposed to represent, so I can't show you how to apply it to DDP, but the Haskell wiki's ...


5

I think FUZxxl's comment is absolutely correct. When I type into Hugs' repl: Hugs> fst(a,b) ERROR - Undefined variable "b" Hugs> snd(a,b) ERROR - Undefined variable "b" This isn't a lazy/eager evaluation thing -- when Hugs checks to make sure that fst(a,b) is valid Haskell code, it notices that a and b aren't defined. Those two letters don't have ...


5

The code in your question does nothing because it contains a type error and a syntax error. f :: Integer -> Integer --> [Integer] As you can see from the highlighting the last bit is a comment because -- starts a comment in Haskell. As a consequence, the declared type of f is Integer -> Integer, which is wrong. To fix this change --> to ->. ...


5

I assume you type this right into the interactive prompt. Sadly, these are relatively primitive in Haskell - complex definitions, such as fact, can't be entered at the prompt, at least not in the same way you'd normally write them. You need to put function definitions etc. into modules, then load those via (e.g.) :load fact.hs. There are resources for Hugs ...


5

Usually people use Hugs for small, testing-type prototypes (analogously to how Ruby users would use irb and Python users would use the interpreter), but for actual shipping code, GHC is by far the most popular target (analogous to how Python users would compile import modules to cpython). They're all pretty much standards-compliant, its a matter of speed of ...


5

let bindings are recursive, so this line let csv = (insertRow "abc,def,ghi" csv) creates an infinite loop, you're defining csv in terms of itself in a way that doesn't terminate. Change it to let csv' = ... and print csv' in the next line.


5

It's possible to slightly modify your bruteforce search to get better performance on random data. Main idea is to sort points by x coordinate and, while comparing distances in loop, consider only points that have horizontal distance not grater than current minimum distance. This could be order of magnitude faster but in the worst case it is still O(n^2). ...


5

I suppose it's just a typo: ger_rtg at the last line declares a new function, so get_rtg can't be pattern matched now in a non-[] case. Also, I would use filter to do this operation: get_rtg = filter (\(_,reg,acts,_,_,_) -> reg `elem` acts)



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