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14

Make sure your SBCL was compiled with thread support. When running single-threaded, the Hunchentoot request handling loop does not return to the REPL. Threading is not the default setting in the binaries from http://www.sbcl.org/ for Mac OS X. On Mac OS X, I usually download the sbcl.org binaries to get started, then download the sources and rebuild with ...


7

I am wondering how my app written in Common Lisp would serve pages to a web client. Hunchentoot serves all things that are in its *dispatch-table*, which is just a list of dispatch handlers. The simplest thing to do is to serve a static file. One typical example would be a CSS file: (push (create-static-file-dispatcher-and-handler "/example.css" ...


7

This is SLIME "magic". In fact, you can't do anything with such "print representation" in Lisp, because it is considered an unreadable object: try it in the console mode of your implementation. But SLIME remembers the association to the actual object, so it will substitute the object for that #<...> thing - kind of like a Lisp Machine... What will ...


6

Hmm... ok, well the hunchentoot site says a lot of the basic packages are in LispWorks. So I download that. This just means that the author has written a lot of Lispworks-specific code in Hunchentoot. It does not mean that Hunchentoot only works on Lispworks. Still not sure how to get the source for the packages that I downloaded into these ...


6

The quickest way in Ubuntu is to use the packages included in that distribution. It is "ok" if you just want to try some things, but these versions are often comparatively old. I would recommend the packages sbcl and slime. If you don't know emacs yet, you can get into that quite fast through its built-in tutorial (C-h t (press Control-h, release, then ...


6

The simplest translation to code will be this: (hunchentoot:start (make-instance 'hunchentoot:acceptor :port 4242 :document-root #p"<path to static files dir>"))


6

Here is a snippet which serves a single static webpage: (push (create-static-file-dispatcher-and-handler "/stylesheet.css" "~/projects/project-x/stylesheet.css") *dispatch-table*) To make a whole folder available try create-folder-dispatcher-and-handler.


6

jsmpereira has added sbcl/hunchentoot capabilities. https://github.com/jsmpereira/heroku-cl-example


6

Thanks to wvxvw's comments, I found the solution to this question. The json object can be retrieved by calling hunchentoot:raw-post-data. To be more detailed, we first call (hunchentoot:raw-post-data :force-text t) to get the post data as a string, and then feed it to jsown:parse. A complete easy-handler is shown below: (hunchentoot:define-easy-handler ...


6

The Hunchentoot API does not directly give you access to multiple uploaded files, but you can use (hunchentoot:post-parameters *request*) to retrieve the list of all POST parameters (which includes the uploaded files). This will be an alist, and you can get a list of all uploaded files using standard alist techniques (e.g. (remove "file" ...


6

These are so-called 'Presentations'. See the SLIME User Manual, Presentations. The documentation also explains what happens if the objects don't go away... The idea mostly comes from BBN (Zdybel, et al., An Information Presentation System, 1981), then the Symbolics Lisp Machine and the portable Common Lisp Interface Manager, which records the underlying ...


5

If you don't need ssl (or will use Apache for this), you can (push 'hunchentoot-no-ssl *features*) and then (ql:quickload 'hunchentoot)


5

That's because you don't want to write directly in the stream. CL-USER> (with-html-output-to-string (s) (:div :id "test")) "<div id='test'></div>" CL-USER> (with-html-output-to-string (s) (:html (:body (do ((cnt 1 (+ cnt 1))) ((> cnt 3)) (htm (:div :id (format nil ...


5

Maybe you are looking for this? CL-USER> (puri:render-uri (puri:enough-uri "http://foo.bar.com/baz/blub" "http://foo.bar.com/") nil) "/baz/blub"


5

Common Lisp has packages. Packages are kind of namespaces for symbols. Thus one can have many different symbols named "->", each one in a different package. Thus normalizer::-> is not necessarily EQ to cl-user::->. Symbols can also be NOT interned in a package, thus one can have many different symbols of the same name and no a package. CL-USER 2 ...


4

You need to make sure what the input is you get. Is it a symbol? Common Lisp has functions like TYPE-OF, INSPECT and DESCRIBE to get more information about data. * (describe 'north) COMMON-LISP-USER::NORTH [symbol] * (type-of 'north) SYMBOL The next question is: if it is a symbol, in which package is it? * (symbol-package 'north) #<PACKAGE ...


4

Running Lisp applications from command line Many (not all) Lisp implementations support a save-image (or save-world or dump) mechanism that will encapsulate a body of code and run functions at startup. As another poster said, these mechanisms are platform- and vendor-specific. Most Lisp implementations (all?) have a command-line interface. So a ...


3

For format specifically, Andrew's answer is the right one. In general, you can use str: CL-USER> (with-html-output-to-string (*standard-output*) (:p (str (format nil "~A" '<hello/>)))) "<p><HELLO/></p>" Note that the string isn't HTML-escaped in this case (this goes for fmt as well). If you want it to be, use esc ...


3

The macro with-html-output-to-string expands its body using special evaluation rules. In particular, any not recognized forms are left as is, which means macros are not expanded before the html generating code is generated, which means by the time your publish-newsfeed macro is expanded by the standard compiler it is no longer in context ...


3

Make a subclass and specialize that way: (defclass my-acceptor (hunchentoot:acceptor) ()) (defmethod session-cookie-name ((acceptor my-acceptor)) "my-session") The function still takes an acceptor, it's just your kind of acceptor, now.


3

Your example works for me, at least modified to work with current Hunchentoot 1.0.0, but that is merely change of (hunchentoot:start-server :port 8705) to (hunchentoot:start (make-instance 'hunchentoot:acceptor :port 8705)). In any case, while possible, you are not really supposed to run things from inside files loaded by ASDF. It serves a role analogous to ...


3

See also https://github.com/bhyde/heroku-buildpack-ccl64-example1 which is an example of doing that via a buildapp that provides ccl64 + quicklisp + asdf


3

My interim solution looks something like this: (defparameter *save-last-request* t) (defvar *last-request* nil) (defun store-request () (when *save-last-request* (setf *last-request* *request*))) (defmacro with-last-request (&body body) `(let* ((*request* *last-request*) (*session* (slot-value *request* 'hunchentoot:session))) ...


3

The lambda-list of define-easy-handler is just a shortcut for using lower-level calls. You can get more extensive access to parameters by using functions like like GET-PARAMETER and POST-PARAMETER. You can get an alist of all parameters by using get-parameters* (or post-parameters*) in the body of the handler.


2

define-easy-handler registers the handler you are defining automatically in a global variable which gets checked when a HTTP request arrives (the variable is called *easy-handler-alist*). So it's being taken care of automatically. Do you want to use a handler of a different form than the one defined in the tutorial? I think there is an example using ...


2

Probably one of the fastest ways to get started is to use Lisp in a Box (or a spinoff like LispBox). These are full sets of everything you need. You could also try the Lisp Resource Kit, which is a bootable CDROM with Lisp tools and documentation, all already set up for you. Just put it into your CDROM drive and boot!


2

Install gpg wget http://common-lisp.net/project/lispy/key.asc gpg --import key.asc You should be good to go.


2

One obvious mistake is that you misspelt "standard". Therefore, binding a stream to *standart-output* (sic) does not re-bind *standard-output*, as you perhaps intended.


2

This situation is described in the CL-WHO evaluation rules under "A form which is neither a string nor a keyword..." (:label :for name label) falls under that rule, and it's just evaluated, but it doesn't output anything so it has no effect. One easy fix: use (str label) instead.


2

It looks like the files Quicklisp has downloaded are not valid; they don't start with the expected GZIP file header. Instead, they start with <!... which looks very much like HTML. Do you have a proxy involved on your network? If so, try this: (setf (ql-config:config-value "proxy-url") "http://your.proxy.url:xyz/")



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