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So, a couple things come to mind. If your Netduino has network connectivity, you could write data to a file on the SD card and then transfer the file out via FTP. There are plenty of libraries to do this with. Same as 1, except push the data to a web service. There is an HTTPRequest library you could use to do up a quick JSON post to a web service. You ...


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Read up on exception handling. In python, you create a try block that contains the operation you're attempting, followed by one or more except blocks that each name one or more exception classes you are interested in handling. In this case, you're seeing pigpio.error exceptions. What you might do is something like: # try up to 3 times on a failure success ...


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You could use sensors with I2C Interface like the Maxim DS1621. Alternatively connect analog sensors to A/D converters with I2C Interface like the Texas Instruments ADS1000. The measurements could be displayed on the LCD, maybe even with a history. UART could be used to send the measurements via USB or Serial Port to a PC. The SPI could be used to log the ...


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While this seems akward, it is the expected behaviour. The I2C protocoll does not provide any means of the slave to end the requested transmission. The length is solely defined by the quantity parameter given to Wire.requestFrom. This way the master decides, and have to know, how much bytes the slave will send. Wire.available only signals if the previously ...


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The first obvious error is how you treat the array temp[20]. You only read one byte from the sensor, but then write the value off the end of the array. (The only valid spots in the array are temp[0] to temp[19]. temp[20] is past the memory allocated.) You should be reading 3 bytes from the sensor and storing them at temp[0] to temp[2]. The next error with ...


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Rule out I2C errors first. Your software I2C library is no help at all. Make sure you read registers PART_ID, REV_ID, SEQ_ED first and that the values match the data sheet resp. your expected values. This is to rule out I2C errors. You have to take quite a few steps to get a single reading to get started. Reset the Si114x. Program the HW_KEY. Program ...


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Well... it just seemed that a wire to the scope interfered too much. And the device-address is sent by the driver when writing or reading, to answer my own question.


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It's not compressed, it's just a raw binary unsigned 32-bit int stored big-endian. The four bytes you have there are shown in octal: 0, 6, 32, 200, in decimal are 0, 6, 26, and 128, and as a 32-bit int is 6*65536 + 26*256 + 128 = 400000. There are many ways to unpack that; from python, on my RPi 2, which currently has an i2c freq of 100000: >>> ...


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There's a lot of flat-out wrong information in the comments. First of all, your read_bit() function never toggles the clock. That's probably your problem, along with @user3629249's comment that the master sends an ACK bit after every 8 bits from the slave. You'll have to address this in your read_byte() function. Second: I2C does not care about clock ...


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The fault must lie elsewhere, because when I run this program which duplicates your types and actions, it works perfectly. #include <stdio.h> #define uint8_t unsigned char #define uint16_t unsigned short int main (int argc, char *argv[]) { uint8_t str[2] = { 0x12, 0x34 }; uint16_t reg, *register_value = &reg; *register_value = ...


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Add a line in your function : register_address |= 0x80; From the LIS3DH datasheet : ... a 8-bit sub-address (SUB) is transmitted: the 7 LSb represent the actual register address while the MSB enables address auto increment. If the MSb of the SUB field is ‘1’, the SUB (register address) is automatically increased to allow multiple data ...



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