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17

You can implement IDataErrorInfo additionally in your VM and route the calls to the VM to your corresponding domain objects. I think this is the only way without exposing domain objects directly to the view.


17

Tab items tend to mess up with adorners (although I don't know why, I experienced it). I could reproduce your problem. Solve it by wrapping the contents of the TabItem with an AdornerDecorator. So: <TabControl > <TabItem Header="tabItem1" Name="tabItem1" GotFocus="tabItem1_GotFocus"> <AdornerDecorator> ...


17

This is kind of a complex request, and honestly it'll probably vary based on preference more than anything else. But, here's my understanding: Performance: Exceptions will lose nearly every time unless your other implementations are horrendous. There's significant overhead to the throw/catch cycle. (Anecdote: I had a 'must be a number' check that was an ...


16

Basically, if you implement IDataErrorInfo, validation is implemented in the bound object, whereas if you implement validation rules, validation is implemented in objects attached to the binding. Personally, if you're using MVVM, I think you'd have to be crazy to ever use anything except IDataErrorInfo. You want validation to live in the view model. If ...


12

Not using Mode=TwoWay for DataGridTextColumns solves one version of the problem, however it seems that this problem can appear out of nowhere for other reasons as well. (Anyone who has a good explanation as of why not using Mode=TwoWay solves this in the first place is probably close to a solution to this problem) The same thing just happened to me with ...


10

The simplest way is to raise a PropertyChanged notification for in the setter for both properties that need to be validated like bathineni suggests private DateTime StartDate { get { return _startDate; } set { if (_startDate != value) { _startDate = value; RaisePropertyChanged("StartDate"); ...


9

Check out Beth Massi's article on implementing validation here Basically, you've used a DataTrigger where you just need a Trigger So: <Style.Triggers> <Trigger Property="Validation.HasError" Value="true"> <Setter ... /> </Trigger> </Style.Triggers>


9

I think it is much easier to use the Validation attributes. class MyBusinessObject { [Required(ErrorMessage="Must enter customer")] public string Customer { get; set; } [Range(10,99, ErrorMessage="Price must be between 10 and 99")] public decimal Price { get; set; } // I have also created some custom attributes, e.g. validate paths ...


9

This works with the ErrorProvider component in Windows Forms. For a complete, but very simple and short tutorial, see this blog post.


8

Yeah, I see where you could use the indexer. Not a bad way to go I guess. I was really focused on the 'Error' property though. I like the notion of having the errors contained within the business object. I think what I want to do doesnt exist natively, so I just created a dictionary of errors (updated anytime a property changes) on the object and let ...


8

From your comment on your implementation of IDataErrorInfo change your implementation to this style.... #region IDataErrorInfo Members public string Error { get { return this[null] } } public string this[string columnName] { get { StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder(); if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(columnName) || columnName == ...


7

This is a standard feature of the C# language called an Indexer. Generally you would use these when writing your own collections, or similar types. Here is a brief (not real world) example. public class Foo { private List<int> m_Numbers = new List<int>(); public int this[int index] { get { return m_Numbers[index]; ...


7

The option I went with was to implement IDataErrorInfo explicitly in a base class which is extended by all ViewModels and Entities. This seems the best compromise to get things ticking over with WPF, and at least keeps the implementation of IDataErrorInfo hidden to callers so they at least appear clean. I expose a protected ValidateProperty which can be ...


6

Yep, Matt is right. I wish I looked his answer hour ago, not to spend time finding issue myself. The other option that worked for me is to use converter class that checks if Errors list has items. So it will look like <Trigger Property="Validation.HasError" Value="true"> <Setter Property="ToolTip" Value="{Binding ...


6

if you are using M-V-VM, the ViewModel should define the IDataErrorInfo interface, not the model. You could say that the IDataErrorInfo interface is just for the view and it doesn't belong in the model, but that's a question of style. Having the ViewModel implement the IDataErrorInfo interface and propagate the errors from the model would be the simplest ...


6

Just raise the NotifyPropertyChanged event for the property you want to validate or if you are in .NET 4.5 or Silverlight 4 use the INotityDataErrorInfo.


6

Worth remembering also that you can raise NotifyPropertyChanged with String.Empty property. This will force validation of all properties at that level. Can be useful at times.


6

You mention that you don't want to raise property changed for the properties you bind to, but that's really the simplest way to accomplish this. Calling PropertyChanged with no parameter will raise for all properties in your viewmodel. Alternatively you can update the bindings (and force revalidation) on any control like this: ...


6

I wouldn't do this. I would keep the validations done 'inside' IDataErrorInfo simple and contextless. Any validations that depend on context, such as cross-entity validations and validations that are dependent on a database, do that validation when you save the changes. Trying these more complex context based validations in IDataErrorInfo will be error ...


6

In your style triggers you set the tooltip to the Validation error when you have an error. You can do the same when you don't have an error by manipulating the Value property of the Trigger <Style x:Key="StandardComboBoxStyle" TargetType="{x:Type ComboBox}"> <Style.Triggers> <Trigger Property="Validation.HasError" Value="True"> ...


5

I think there is no right way or wrong way. It all depends on your application and whether or not your using different patterns or architectures or have specific needs within your WPF application. If your using different tiered architecture, you could put your validation within the business layer of your application. If that's the case, use This link. ...


5

I had similar problem. Fight it for hours just to realize that something was wrong with adorner layer. What I did is put my with controls inside . And that was it. For some reason this decorator layer sometimes is gone. This is certainly true for TabControl (but in my case it was some other reason). So it should look like this <AdornerDecorator> ...


5

The ErrorTemplate for UserControl will be used if bindings to your UserControl use ValidatesOnDataErrors=True. But you can remove the red border with the Validation.ErrorTemplate Attached Property. All controls within your UserControl will only show a red border if you validate their bindings by implementing IDataErrorInfo for the backing ...


5

I agree with Steven that you should perform the server-side validations when attempting to save the data. Another reason for this is network latency. Since WPF's support for IDataErrorInfo uses input events to determine when properties are validated, and results in a blocking/synchronous call to your VM object, the use of IDataErrorInfo has a direct impact ...


5

IDateErrorInfo IDateErrorInfo is supported by the MVC framework (a Microsoft tutorial can be found here). The default model binder will be reponsible for recreating model objects by binding the html form elements to the model. If the model binder detects that the model implements the interface then it will use the interface methods to validate each ...


5

OK, I found a relatively simple solution which doesn't force me to change any control templates. Instead of decorating each TextBox with an AdornerDecorator like this <StackPanel> <AdornerDecorator> <TextBox Text={Binding ...} /> </AdornerDecorator> <AdornerDecorator> <TextBox Text={Binding ...} ...


5

Late entry to the discussion as I do not want to start a new question. Where I am coming from is to determine the best practice to apply to a medium size ASP.NET MVC project. Let me first summarise our options :- 1) IDataErrorInfo is simple to implement. All you need is to derive IDataErrorInfo in your Model class. The catch is that you are letting your ...


5

Thanks to Michael for his help. Unfortunately, I need bindings to remain constantly synchronized, with only validation deferred. Otherwise, Michael's solution would do the job. So, I went in a slightly different direction. Here is the solution I ultimately implemented. Simple demo: Let's start with the simplest case: My business objects implement ...


4

I believe the problem is with your TextBox's template in the Validation.HasError trigger. <Trigger Property="Validation.HasError" Value="true"> <Setter Property="ToolTip" Value="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}, Path=(Validation.Errors)[0].ErrorContent}"/> <Setter Property="Background" ...


4

Looks like DataAnnotations are getting official support in MVC 2.0. Scott Guthrie published a good article on doing model validation in 2.0 using DataAnnotations. Given that the team seems headed this direction, you might consider that a vote in its favor.



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