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13

Doing this really helps. Basically use ido-mode up until you get to the correct directory, then hit C-f again to get out of ido-mode as you type the new filename. C-x C-f navigate to directory C-f enter new filename RET.


12

As stated in a comment you just type "d:/" in the minibuffer while in ido-find-file. You don't need to be at the start of the string, it's intelligent enough to know what you're trying to do. C-x C-f d:/ MyFile.txt will point you at the file D:/MyFile.txt


9

(Updated primarily in order to include actual setup instructions for use with the below mentioned find-file-in-project.el from the RINARI distribution. Original answer left intact; the new bits come after the second horizontal rule.) Have a look at the TextMate page of the EmacsWiki. The most promising thing they mention is probably this Emacs Lisp ...


8

Edit: This is now a package in the Marmalade repo. It has been expanded into a full-fledged minor mode. Development happens on GitHub. Original post: Here is my refinement of Jacobo's answer. Credit to him for the original magic. I've added an override variable, which you can use to prevent the use of ido-completing-read in specific functions. I have also ...


8

You can just provide * as the file name and press Enter; you'll be asked for a confirmation and if you press Enter a second time, all files in the directory will be opened. Note that "opening all files in a directory" involves opening dired buffers for all of its subdirectories. When not using ido-mode -- at the basic Emacs find-file prompt -- you can use ...


6

CTRL + SHIFT + r will search each for any "Resource" (file), anywhere in your project CTRL + SHIFT + e will search for a specific open file (ie. your buffers) CTRL + SHIFT + PageUp/PageDown will navigate to the next/previous open buffer CTRL + SHIFT + Left/Right will navigate backward/forward in your browsing history (eg. if you went from tab 1 to tab ...


6

Hocus pocus, abracadabra, presto! (defadvice completing-read (around foo activate) (if (boundp 'ido-cur-list) ad-do-it (setq ad-return-value (ido-completing-read prompt (all-completions "" collection predicate) nil require-match initial-input hist def)))) That works with everything but subr's, from which ...


5

As mentioned: being fast, using C-j to confirm immediately, and using and additional C-f to temporarily switch to the traditional mode are all useful. Also, when ido has already selected an alternate file path, you can hit C-z to return where you were and temporarily disable that behavior.


5

Put this in your .zshrc: chpwd() { print -P "\033AnSiTc %d" } print -P "\033AnSiTu %n" print -P "\033AnSiTc %d" The chpwd() function is run every time the pwd changes. The line ending in %d is the one that allows you to track the current directory--I repeat it outside the function to make sure it is run when zsh first initializes. But Emacs requires us ...


3

Expanding on Tomasz's answer. There are other options for uniquify-buffer-name-style, besides forward, that you may consider: Files /foo/bar/mumble/name and /baz/quux/mumble/name would have the following buffer names in the various styles: forward bar/mumble/name quux/mumble/name reverse name\mumble\bar name\mumble\quux post-forward ...


3

I don't think ido-mode is ready for this quite yet. In particular, ido-completing-read currently only works with strings, while completing-read supports alists as well. This is very important once you want to have a different user-level description of the items you want to complete on. Therefore I am not surprised that it doesn't work out of the box, yet. ...


3

I started using it recently and I like it. It is especially useful in following situations: you have a list of file-with-long-name-a, file-with-long-name-b, ... So you can type "a", "b" and it will choose a correct one you are looking for a file someting-key-something, you type "key" and you are there The same thing is for buffers. And if you dont like ...


2

Theres some good quick file finder plugins like fuzzyfinder http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script%5Fid=1984 that could enhance your experience. (Fuzzy Finder seems to do ambiguous selection) Also you might want to look at wildmode tweaks options ala :he wildmode The method I explained here doesnt to the ambigous trick but it is tab friendly. ...


2

You can get the effect you want by using GNU Global or IDUtils. They are not Emacs specific, but they has Emacs scripts that integrate that effect. (I don't know too much about them myself.) You could also opt to use CEDET and the EDE project system. EDE is probably a bit heavy weight, but it has a way to just mark the top of a project. If you also keep ...


2

Use C-j to tell ido to input what you have typed rather than the first completion. This is also mentioned on emacswiki.


2

Building off of pokita's answer, (defun visit-most-recent-file () "Visits the most recently open file in `recentf-list' that is not already being visited." (interactive) (let ((buffer-file-name-list (mapcar 'buffer-file-name (buffer-list))) most-recent-filename) (dolist (filename recentf-list) (unless (memq filename ...


1

Short answer: (setq ido-save-directory-list-file "/some/file/name"). Long answer: I keep all the little files that remember Emacs's state in a single directory under the user-emacs-directory. I'm not sure what this is on Windows, but I think it's C:\Users\<username>\Application Data\.emacs.d\. On Unix, it's ~/.emacs.d/. The variable ...


1

Using Emacs 24.3, ido-ubiquitous didn't work for me. So tried this and it is working fine so far: (defun my-completing-read (prompt collection &optional predicate require-match initial-input hist def inherit-input-method) (if (listp collection) (ido-completing-read prompt collection predicate require-match ...


1

Use lusty explorer. Configure it with: (require 'lusty-explorer) ;; Override the normal file-opening and buffer switching. (global-set-key (kbd "C-x C-f") 'lusty-file-explorer) (global-set-key (kbd "C-x b") 'lusty-buffer-explorer))


1

You can do this by using the recentf package: (require 'recentf) (defvar my-recentf-counter 0) (global-set-key (kbd "<M-up>") (lambda () (interactive) (setq my-recentf-counter (1+ my-recentf-counter)) (recentf-open-most-recent-file my-recentf-counter))) You will probably face the problem that there are files in ...


1

A way to make recentf ignore some files, just add appripriate regexps to recentf-exclude list: (add-to-list 'recentf-exclude "\\.windows\\'") (add-to-list 'recentf-exclude "\\.revive\\'") This will prevent any future entries of the above from being added to the recentf list. Need to delete the current entries in your recentf file for them to be ...


1

Looks like ido-list-directory is used for interactive completion of list-directory. So, if the thing at point is a filename, rather than use ido, using list-directory directly should achieve the same end result. How about something like this: (defun ido-ffap-list-directory () (interactive) (let ((fap (ffap-guess-file-name-at-point))) (if fap ...


1

I have the same problem. We're upgrading to RHEL5, so I assume we'll have emacs 21 for a long time. Luckily the EmacsWiki has a link to an older version. It's over a decade old, but it's better than nothing. It seems to work fine, but some of the constants have different names. For example, I had set ido-default-file-method to selected-window, but the ...


1

File-name groking is nowhere near as useful as more general pattern-matching. In Icicles file-name completion, you can open any number of files matching any number of patterns, from the same minibuffer. Pattern-matching can be substring, regexp, fuzzy, or prefix, and you can combine patterns using intersection and complementing. Just as in Ido, in Icicles ...


1

The basic problem here is that while there's a read-file-name-function which ido can attach itself to, there's no read-directory-name-function, ido-mode has no explicit support for this feature of dired, and there's nothing about the read-file-name invocation I could figure out that ido-mode could hook onto. All I can suggest is to just turn off ido by ...


1

There are a number of solutions to this problem. I happen to prefer my implementation which changes the prompt to contain the current path, which Emacs recognizes and uses to get the behavior you want. Additionally, my solution hides the portion of the prompt which contains the path because I find it ugly. My solution can be found in the blog post: Emacs ...


1

eproject has eproject-grep, which does exactly what you want. With the right project definition, it will only search project files; it will ignore version control, build artifacts, generated files, whatever. The only downside is that it requires a grep command on your system; this dependency will be eliminated soon.



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