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8

You can use String.Join: string result = String.Join(", ", emails);


5

Well any time you call ElementAt, if it's just a sequence (i.e. not an IList<T>) it will have to iterate all the way through the sequence as far as the given element number - there's no other way of it getting to the value. It sounds like you should just have: string previousLine = null; foreach (var line in readFile) { // Work with line and ...


5

Beyond reading the documentation I'd describe IEnumerable<T> as a collection of Ts, it can be iterated over and many other functions can be carried out (such as Where(), Any() and Count()) however it's not designed for adding and removing elements. That's a List<T>. It's useful because it's a fundamental interface for many collections, various ...


4

I'm not sure what kind of index you're looking for, but if it's just set of consecutive numbers then you're lucky. There is Select overload that does exactly that: return accidents.Select((t, i) => new Accident() {Id = i, Name = t.Replace("\"", string.Empty)}).ToArray(); It expects a delegate that takes two parameters - the item and its index.


4

The list (enumerable) is only enumerated when the result of ProcessList (enum2) is enumerated: static void Main(string[] args) { var enumerable = Enum1(); Console.WriteLine("Enum1 retrieved"); var enum2 = Enum2(enumerable); Console.WriteLine("Enum2 called"); foreach (var e in enum2) { Console.WriteLine(e); } } private ...


3

The problem you have here is not TSource being null; it's the object you want to get source from is null (group2). You can always use Enumerable.Empty to save your magic one liners. List<Type> allTypes = group.GetTypes().Union(group2 != null ? group2.GetTypes() : Enumerable.Empty<Type>()).ToList(); Or you can use a reusable Union overload: ...


3

All you need here is a method to get the types of a group that can support a null parameter, since yours doesn't. It's a pretty simple method to write: public static IEnumerable<Type> MyGetTypes(Group group) { if(group == null) return Enumerable.Empty<Type>(); else return group.GetTypes(); } (You can make it an ...


3

Why do you add it to the list if you want to remove it later anyway? However, since the key is a string and the value is also a string this should work: finaldata = finaldata .Where(d => d.Values.Cast<string>().Any(str => !String.IsNullOrEmpty(str))) .ToList(); or finaldata.RemoveAll(d => ...


3

It seems that you can try using Linq, something like that: var codes = File .ReadLines(@"C:/AirCodes/RAPT.TXT") .Select(line => line.Split(',')) .Select(items => new { // I've created a simple anonymous class, // you'd probably want to create you own one Code = items[0].Trim('"'), //TODO: Check numbers ...


2

It's hard to know for sure without a more complete code example. But I would expect this to work for you: EducationStatusEnum[] values = (EducationStatusEnum[])Enum .GetValues(typeof(EducationStatusEnum)); var list = from value in values select new SelectListItem() { Value = ((int)value).ToString(), ...


2

You'll probably want to make use of String's Split function on each line to get the values into an array. while ((line = sr.ReadLine()) != null) { var values = line.Split(","); // here you have an array of strings containing the values between commas var airportCode = values[0]; var airportName = values[2]; var airportCountry = values[3]; var ...


2

You can use LINQ: Path.Combine(items.Select(o => o.Name))


2

This could happen if enumerable changes between the calls. It seems GetNetworkRoutes uses lazy evalution to return the result. And that's why it's result is enumerated each time you call Min method on it. So the second returns different results and that's why the min. value you get is different. If you want to prevent this use ToList or ToArray method to ...


2

The best I've found for putting a null check in one line is the ternary operator. List<Type> allTypes = group2 == null ? group.GetTypes() : group.GetTypes().Union(group2.GetTypes()).ToList();


2

For this kind of situation, I typically create a new extension method. E.g.: public static IEnumerable<T> SafeUnion<T>( this IEnumerable<T> source1, IEnumerable<T> source2) { return source1 != null ? (source2 != null ? source1.Union(source2) : source1) : source2; } Or whatever specific logic makes the most sense in ...


1

Use Enumerable.Range to generate the ID values and then use the current value to index into your String Array: Enumerable.Range(0, accidents.Length).Select(f => new Accident() { Id = f, Name = accidents[f] })


1

Use of the yield keyword means that this snippet of code will evaluate only as needed to provide the results you use. In other words, this will not cause evaluation: var processed = ProcessList(unprocessed); The contents of the result list don't matter, so they won't be evaluated yet. However, if you do this: var processed = ...


1

It looks to me like you've just got the arguments the wrong way round. This: Expression.Call(method, property, value) means that you're calling: Enumerable.Contains(x.Col_id, ids) whereas you want Enumerable.Contains(ids, x.Col_id) So just try: var containsMethod = Expression.Call(method, value, property); EDIT: Next, you're building the wrong ...


1

One solution: foreach (int rowval in rowscol) { bool hasNonNullValue = false; Dictionary<string, object> Data = new Dictionary<string, object>(); foreach (Contracts.CommonDataField field in finalColumns) { var valList = record.CommonDataValues.FirstOrDefault(row => row.RowID == rowval && row.FieldName == ...


1

foreach (int rowval in rowscol) { Dictionary<string, object> Data = new Dictionary<string, object>(); bool empty = true; foreach (Contracts.CommonDataField field in finalColumns) { var valList = record.CommonDataValues.FirstOrDefault(row => row.RowID == rowval && row.FieldName == field.FieldName); if (valList ...


1

The key is to build a set of arrays for each column of your data instead of for each rows like the Dictionary enumerator will provide you. This can be achieved through the use of the Aggregate extension method and a simple Select statement. // Assuming the following class as a destination type class Foo { public Foo(string[] values) { Code = ...


1

As error states you are passing a wrong type. Change @{Html.RenderPartial("~/Views/Application/AppView.cshtml", new Example.Services.DAL.Application());} to: @{Html.RenderPartial("~/Views/Application/AppView.cshtml", new List<Example.Services.DAL.Application> { new Example.Services.DAL.Application() });}


1

Your AppView.cshtml is bind to strongly type of @model IEnumerable<Example.Services.DAL.Application> and while calling this view you are passing @{Html.RenderPartial("~/Views/Application/AppView.cshtml", new Example.Services.DAL.Application());} It should be the list object. You must pass list of Example.Services.DAL.Application() Change your ...


1

My assumption is quests.Where(userQuestionnaireFilter) is hitting database and the generated SQL query si taking time. so use like this IEnumerable quests = null; if (userQuestionnaireFilter != null) quests = quests.Where(userQuestionnaireFilter); int counter = quests.select(p=>p."AnyIndexedColumnName").Count(); Well it depends how the ...


1

You cannot create an instance of a List<T> if T is unknown at compile time. That's the generics' purpose, actually: strong typing. The foreach question is simple: object returnList = methodToCall.Invoke(null, null); IEnumerable enumerable = returnList as IEnumerable; if (enumerable != null) { foreach (var item in enumerable) { // do the ...


1

Use the powerful Linq functions. int[] collection = new int[] {1,2,3} var modified = collection.Select(i => i * 2).ToArray(); You can also use a method (called functions in c++) to hide more complex transformations. int Transform(int input) { return input * 2; } void Later() { collection.Select(Transform); }


1

There is a simple answer to your question: that's not possible. Let's inspect how does this foreach (var item in enumerable) work behind the scenes. When you state foreach (var item in enumerable) item.DoWork();, .NET compiler translates this to: var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator(); try { while (enumerator.MoveNext()) { var ...


1

These following solutions maybe what your looking for, However you'll have to work out which one is more appropriate based on your circumstances Given var myKey = "someKey"; Assuming, your list of dictionaries contains the key your looking for, only once var aDictionary = MyEnumerable.Single(x => x.ContainsKey(myKey)); aDictionary[myKey] = ...



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