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2

According to the reference source of HashSet (link), the iteration order is predictable in the absence of set modifications. public bool MoveNext() { if (version != set.m_version) { throw new InvalidOperationException(SR.GetString(SR.InvalidOperation_EnumFailedVersion)); } while (index < set.m_lastIndex) { if ...


2

There are two possible answers to this, really. The first is "yes, because enumerating a HashSet is deterministic, and you can simply look in the source if you don't believe me". The second is "no, because if you want to get technical, the documentation for HashSet<T>.GetEnumerator() does not say the order is deterministic, so tomorrow the ...


0

If you wish to create a separate function, what @brz mentioned is absolutely correct, you can also achieve the same using Concat:- var result = L1.Concat(L2).Concat(L3);


0

All you have to do is to change: public static IEnumerable<T> Concartenate<T>(params IEnumerable<T> List) to public static IEnumerable<T> Concartenate<T>(params <IEnumerable<T>[] List) Note the extra [].


3

If you want to make your function work you need an array of IEnumerable: public static IEnumerable<T> Concartenate<T>(params IEnumerable<T>[] List) { var Temp = List.First(); for (int i = 1; i < List.Count(); i++) { Temp = Enumerable.Concat(Temp, List.ElementAt(i)); } return Temp; }


8

Use SelectMany: public static IEnumerable<T> Concatenat<T>(params IEnumerable<T>[] lists) { return lists.SelectMany(x => x); }


1

The following is the solution that I was looking for... public static List<List<T>> AllCombinationsOf<T>(params List<T>[] sets) { // need array bounds checking etc for production var combinations = new List<List<T>>(); // prime the data foreach (var value in ...


2

How about var result = LargestTriangleThreeBuckets( new List<Tuple<double, double>> { Tuple.Create(0.0, 0.0), Tuple.Create(2.0, 1.0), Tuple.Create(0.0, 2.0) }, 42); I think, the method you are looking for is Tuple.Create. Just guessing but, PointF or something from ...


0

Tuples are just generic objects. However you use the tuple, just imagine that you created a class with that many Items of the appropriate type. For instance, Tuple< string, int, int> will give you myObj.Item1 as a string, and Items 2 and 3 as integer. You can use it like this: new Tuple<string, int, int>("Steve", 15, 22) In the case of a list: ...


0

The list needs to be grouped by Name, then it can be joined several times depending on count of groups: var groups = testList.GroupBy(_ => _.Name); IEnumerable<IEnumerable<TestParam>> result = null; foreach (var g in groups) { var current = g.Select(_ => new[] { _ }); if (result == ...


0

get all the list of customer first like this var customers = from a in testlist where a.name='customerid' select a; var products = from a in testlist where a.name='productid' select a; then loop customers for(var c in customers) { loop products for(var p in products) { var customerproducts = new ...


4

Equals on a List<T> will only check reference equality between the lists themselves, it does not attempt to look at the items in the list. And as you said you don't want to use SequenceEqual because you don't care about the ordering. In that case you should use CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent, it acts just like Enumerable.SequenceEqual however it does ...


-1

IEnumerable is taking advantage of deferred execution as explained here: IEnumerable vs List - What to Use? How do they work? IEnumerable enable implicit reference conversion for array types which known as Covariance. Consider the following example: public abstract class Vehicle { } public class Car :Vehicle { } private void ...


2

dasblinkenlight's approach is probably the best if you're happy to restrict yourself to collections where you know the length beforehand. If you don't, you might want to add an extension method like this (untested): public static IEnumerable<T> SkipEnd<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int countToSkip) { ...


4

Since you know the length upfront, you could use Skip and Take, like this: var res = Y.Skip(1).Take(Y.Length-2); Of course you need to check that Y.Length is at least 2.


0

Thanks to @JeffMercado, the solution was very simple. The method signature for my second Create function needed to be: static public PagedResult<T> Create<T>(PagedRequest request, IEnumerable<T> data, long totalCount) instead of: static public PagedResult<T> Create(PagedRequest request, IEnumerable<T> data, long totalCount) ...


0

In general, a "blocking execution" will be some degree of inefficient. But I'd probably use ToArray for that form, and your non-blocking version is a little confusing. Is it really supposed to do work for each one that the blocking one doesn't? I would probably do this. public override IEnumerable<Row> Execute(IEnumerable<Row> rows, bool ...


0

IEnumerable can only be iterated once. You cannot iterate twice on an IEnumerable and expect to get the same values. For instance, the IEnumerable may come from a yield return function, each time you call GetEnumerator() on the IEnumerable you start a new call to this function which may create new values. This is not a common use case, but it exists. I ...


3

MoniDetails is null because it was never instantiated. This should generally be done when constructing the object: public class MoniGridModel { public IEnumerable<MoniModel> MoniDetails { get; set; } public MoniGridModel() { MoniDetails = new List<MoniModel>(); } } That way consuming code doesn't need to worry about ...


4

You've never instantiated MoniDetails (it's value is null when you create the MoniGridModel): public ActionResult MoniDetails() { MoniModel mim = new MoniModel(); MoniGridModel migm = new MoniGridModel(); mim.CategoryId = 1; mim.CategoryName = "a"; mim.ProductId = 1; mim.ProductName = "b"; var details = new ...


0

try this return myClass.Values.Where(x =>filter.Contains(x.MyType));


0

Surely something like return myClass.Values.Where(x => filter.Any(f => f == x.MyType));


0

Try using Enumerable.Contains return myClass.Values.Where(x => filter.Contains(x.MyType)); This, however, may compare for referential equality - also consider the following alternative return myClass.Values.Where(x => filter.Any(f => x.MyType.Equals(f)));


2

What is the context of this code? Are you passing activeContents in as a parameter? Also, what is the declaration of ContentModel? Is that a value type (struct) or reference type (class)? If ContentModel is a class, then you don't need to add and remove the element to change the seq property (I hope that's a property…public fields are icky :p ). Just ...


6

There's no such thing as IEnumerable<string, string>. IEnumerable<T> has only one type parameter. But you can use Enumerable.Zip<TFirst, TSecond, TResult> to create an IEnumerable<Tuple<string, string>> or similar. EDIT: Based on the updated question, it seems you might want something like this: ...


4

(Peter beat me to the punch, but I was half done when his answer appeared, so I'll post it anyhow.) You can get more insight into the difference by instrumenting the code. The instrumentation within the lambda expression is the thing that provides the crucial insight: class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { ...


4

This happens because of the deferred execution of the lambda expression in lazy.Concat(num.Where(s=>s % d1 == 0)). When you declare the variable inside the loop, each instance of the anonymous method gets its own variable. But when you declare the variable outside the loop, they all share the same variable, and of course that variable's value has just ...


0

The way I'm currently doing this is a bit shorter than those already suggested and as far as I can tell gives the desired result: var index = haystack.ToList().IndexOf(needle); It's a bit clunky, but it does the job and is fairly concise.


1

**First()** operates on a collection of any number of objects and returns the first object. **Take(1)** operates on a collection of any number of objects and returns a collection containing the first object. You can also use Single Single() operates on a collection of exactly one object and simply returns the object.


1

A common way to produce a one-for-one projection of one type onto another type is to execute a Select. If the new type is an interface, you have to make an implementation of that interface first: class MyDataParameter : IDataParameter { DbType DbType { get; set; } ParameterDirection Direction { get; set; } bool IsNullable { get; } string ...


1

What you're expecting is called covariance. It means that the actual generic type is more specific than the required one. You can see that covariance does not work for all generic classes: A List<Derived> should not be assignable to a List<Base>, because then what would happen if you add Base intances to the list, which is actually a list of ...


1

Actually, in C#, it is not required to implement the IEnumerable and IEnumerator to customize you own collections. If you iterate the collection by using traditional way that is fine for you, but it will be trouble if you use foreach to iterate the collection. Another reason, if you want to expose your class so that VB.NET user can employ you should ...


1

No need, we can just use // Must implement GetEnumerator, which returns a new StreamReaderEnumerator. public IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator() { return new StreamReaderEnumerator(_filePath); } // Must also implement IEnumerable.GetEnumerator, but implement as a private method. IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() { return ...


0

Yeah, this is pretty manky code but I suppose you could do this: foreach (DataColumn col in dSet.Tables[0].Columns) { if (notNull) { str += row[col].ToString(); } else if (!notNull) { str += ""; } } ...


0

The last method you have to implement IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() is a heritage of ancient .Net versions when .Net doesn't support generics (and IEnumerator<T>). Since then, every IEnumerable<T> for compability reasons should not only implement IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() But old style non-generic IEnumerator ...


1

You could try something like this: void DoWork(IEnumerable items, Type type) { // instance of object you want to call var thirdPartyObject = new ThirdPartyObject(); // create a list with type "type" var typeOfList = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(type); // create an instance of the list and set items ...


4

Since you have IEnumerable myObject; and signature like ThirdPartyMethod<T>(IEnumerable<T> items) you are able to use Cast(): ThirdPartyMethod(myObject.Cast<T>()) If you don't know the T type at the compile time you should provide it at runtime. Consider you third-party library looks like this public static class External { public ...


1

The problem is that in the statement "IEnumerable project = new Project();" you're trying to initialize an IEnumerable object with a Project object. An IEnumerable has to be initialized with an object that implements IEnumerable. Project isn't an enumerable; there's no way to iterate through it. In this case, you could use one of the more-commonly-used ...


1

IEnumerable<Project> cannot be assigned from Project. Correct way to do that: public IEnumrable<Project> pullAllProjects { . . . var projects = new List<Project>(); while (rdr.Read()) { projects.Add(new Project { Id = (int)rdr["project_id"]; Name = ...


1

If I understood you correctly, you need to pass a BinaryReader to the method that expects IEnumerable<byte>. If so, try to use this class: public class MyBinaryReader : BinaryReader, IEnumerable<byte> { public MyBinaryReader(Stream input) : base(input) { } public MyBinaryReader(Stream input, Encoding encoding) : ...


1

Your problem is that you are adding SelectListItems to AvailableCountries inside a try block, but the property has not been initialized so an exception is thrown. You then return the view but AvailableCountries is still null which results in the error message you are seeing. Either initialize it in a parameter-less constructor in the model public class ...



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