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-1

Your best chance to optimize an O(n x m) algorithm is to transform it in multiple consecutive O(n) operations. In order to gain time you must trade off space, so maybe if you create some lookup table based on the data in one of your Enumerables will help you in this case. For example you can construct an int array that will have a value set for each day ...


1

In C#, variance only works for reference types. From Covariance and Contravariance FAQ: Variance is supported only if a type parameter is a reference type. Variance is not supported for value types. And from the C# Spec, 13.1.3.2 Variance Conversion: A type T<A1, …, An> is variance-convertible to a type T<B1, …, Bn> if T is either an ...


2

A faster method would be to perform a join on the two structures, however Linq only supports equi-joins (joins where two expressions are equal). In your case you are joining on one value being in a range of values, so an equi-join is not possible. Before starting to optimize, make sure it needs to be optimized. Would your program be significantly faster ...


1

There is a little problem in your code: rows is IEnumerable so that it can be enumerated multiple times. in foreach. It's a good idea to change it to something more stable, like array, out side of foreach: var myRows = rows as Row[] ?? rows.ToArray(); by the way. I changed your code the following code, using Resharper: var myRows = rows as Row[] ?? ...


2

Talking about class libraries, I think IReadOnly* is really useful, and I think you're doing it right :) It's all about immutable collection... Before there were just immutables and to enlarge arrays was a huge task, so .net decided to include in the framework something different, mutable collection, that implement the ugly stuff for you, but IMHO they ...


1

It seems that you can just return an appropriate interface: ... private readonly List<WorkItem> workItems = new List<WorkItem>(); // Usually, there's no need the property to be virtual public virtual IReadOnlyList<WorkItem> WorkItems { get { return workItems; } } ... Since workItems field is in fact ...


1

This would return results as an array return MyList.ToArray(); or if you want to return it as a List, why not just return MyList;


4

You can use the Enumerator implementation of you inner list MyList: public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator() { return MyList.GetEnumerator(); } Or you can implement an IEnumerator yourself (from MSDN): public class People : IEnumerable { private Person[] _people; public People(Person[] pArray) { _people = new ...


1

return (from q in unitOfWork.GenericRepository<tlkpRelationshipType>().Get() where q.RelationshipTypeID >= 26 where q.RelationshipTypeID <= 30 select new SelectListOptions


3

Use the where clause like so: public IEnumerable<SelectListOptions> GetRelationshipTypes() { return (from q in unitOfWork.GenericRepository<tlkpRelationshipType>().Get() where q.RelationshipTypeID >= 26 && q.RelationshipTypeID <= 30 select new SelectListOptions { Value = ...


0

using System.Web.UI.WebControls; using Trirand.Web.Mvc; enter code here namespace sample.Models { public class PersonalModel { public int PersonID { get; set; } public string LastName { get; set; } public string FirstName { get; set; } public string Address { get; set; } public string City { get; set; } ...


0

You need to check @item.threadposts for null. @if (Model.IEThreadpost != null) { foreach (var item in Model.IEThreadpost) { @if (item.threadposts != null) { @item.threadposts.post } } } Of course, you should recognize ahead of time what the implications of doing that check are, and you should ensure that ...


0

I'm super late answering this, but I just came across it. I wouldn't be particularly uncomfortable with what you've done, I think it's mostly a matter of personal preference and what you consider readable. But if I were to write it, I would probably do something like this. public IEnumerable<PedidosList> Pedidos_Listar(string sComprobante, Clientes ...


5

If I'm not mistaken, IEnumerable<CanFindLocation.Models.MapCompany> mapCompanies = await db.mapCompanies.Where(mc => mc.userName.Equals(userName)).ToListAsync(); var mapLocations = mapCompanies.SelectMany(mapCompany => mapCompany.mapLocations) .Where(mapLocation => mapLocation.userName.Equals(username)); or ...


3

This line ... private readonly List<Department> departments = new List<Department>(); ... should not be in the function, but outside, at the class scope, or make it a var.


0

PROVIDER ======== Here an example where i've splitted the class from the enumerator. MyEnumerableClass is Enumerable so if someone needs to enumerate it, it can retrieve an enumerator on the class. using System; using System.Collections; class MyEnumerableClass : IEnumerable { public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() { return new ...


2

It is virtually never appropriate to use Reset(), since that method is explicitly not reliable: iterator blocks do not support it, for example. So there is very little point worrying about implementing it. If you mean in terms of implementing it: most of the time, the most appropriate thing to do is to use an iterator block (aka yield return), because doing ...


2

You have two main problems here. One is the coding and second is method of access to data. Regarding the data access, the best option would be pipe architecture. Best choice for that would be reading directly bytes from resource. Your coding table is just matrix and can be stored in form of single array char[] coding = {'','a','b','c','d','e',...}; int ...


0

To get specific value, you have to do casts of value, so change SQLDataContext: private SQLDataContext DC = new SQLDataContext(); ... public static IEnumerable<object> ConsultasSQL(int TipoConsulta) { ... } And add this code: var consulta = ConsultasSQL(3) as List<DC.Item.Productos>; if (consulta != null) { datagridview1.datasource = ...


0

You could add an interface to your data classes. That said, if you know the type you're expecting to get at runtime, why are you using IEnumerable<object> at all? Why not have three separate functions, each of which has a single defined purpose? It would be better OO design, imo.


0

Here's a modified version of @Matt Greer's useful answer that includes a static wrapper class so you can just copy-paste this into a new source file, doesn't depend on Linq, and adds a generic IEnumerable overload, to avoid the boxing of value types that would occur with the non-generic version. using System.Collections; using System.Collections.Generic; ...


-1

This is a more interesting question than some of the comments might suggest. As it happens, for this specific list/array implementation the answer is: no difference. Both rely on the same collection interface. But it doesn't have to be that way. If a list is implemented as a doubly-linked list (which it is in many other cases) then appending one list to ...


2

Since an array and a list both implement ICollection<T>, it uses the same code. It resolves to a call to Array.Copy(...) http://referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/collections/generic/list.cs#e569d850a66a1771#references


1

Both Array and List implement the ICollection<T> interface. Therefore, the implementation of List.AddRange that is used will be identical and will offer the same performance. In the future, you can either test something like this yourself with a simple program using the Stopwatch class for timing or download a tool like JetBrain's dotPeek to inspect ...


1

There is no difference between List<T> and T[] - AddRange uses the same handling for anything implementing ICollection<T>, which both of those do.


0

Finally found it, something's missing though. To overcome the first problem of getting an empty ListBox on the view I did this: ListBoxFor(x=>x.Fruits,new List<SelectListItem>(),new{style="width:160px;display:block"}) This will bring up an empty <select multiple="multiple" size="5" name="Fruits"> to the view. Then I add some items to the ...


0

You can: Create class that will contains only this for properties: public class BookModel { int BookID{get;set;} string BookName{get;set;} ? Copies{get;set;} string AuthorName{get;set;} } and use it instead of anonimous. 2. Create navigation properties to Author and to Subject in Book entity class and use Include() instead of Join() to ...


1

You could just return IEnumerable<dynamic> instead of IEnumerable<Book> if you really wanted the anonymous objects, but you're going in a bad direction here. When using the GetAllBooks method further up in your code you'll have no idea what properties these objects have and you'll have to go back to your business code to make sure - and even ...


0

Let's differentiate between two cases: 1) You remove elements from the set whose average is NOT equal to the average of the whole set - as a result the average of the remaining subset will be different - see @Christos answer. 2) You remove elements from the set whose average IS equal to the average of the whole set (as in your example code). In this case ...


7

This is a mathematics issue. For instance if you had {3, 3, 3, 7 } the average would be (3+3+3+7)/4=4 If you remove the duplicates ( the numbers that are the same ), {3, 7} : (3+7)/2=5 So in if you remove the duplicate, you will create a list of the distinc numbers in the initial list and then calling the Average you will get the average of the ...


2

It is possible (though maybe not the best performant solution) to Zip twice, as in: var result = seq1.Zip(seq2, Tuple.Create) .Zip(seq3, (t2, z) => Tuple.Create(t2.Item1, t2.Item2, z));


8

This is a scenario where it is easiest to use the iterator directly, rather than foreach: using(var i1 = seq1.GetEnumerator()) using(var i2 = seq2.GetEnumerator()) using(var i3 = seq3.GetEnumerator()) { while(i1.MoveNext() && i2.MoveNext() && i3.MoveNext()) { var tuple = Tuple.Create(i1.Current, i2.Current, i3.Current); ...


0

Another solution would be to use the extension method Enumerable.Cast as such: Dim a as IEnumerable(Of Integer) = GetA() MethodThatTakesIEnumerableOfObject(a.Cast(Of Object))


0

That is because .Where(x => x % 2 == 0) filters the input string to only those values, that have even indexes, so the output will have half the length of the original.


1

There is the third possibility - use Distinct method version that takes IEqualityComparer. Unfortunately, C# does not support creating anonymous, temporary implementations of interfaces. We can create helper class and extension: public static class IEnumerableExtensions { public class LambdaEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T> { ...


1

If your class only contains those two fields then instead of implementing Equals and GetHashCode You can also do: var listNoDupes = listName.GroupBy(r => new { r.firstParam, r.secondParam }) .Select(grp => grp.First()) .ToList(); Or you can get an IEnumerable<T> back like: ...


1

The problem you are running into is the identity of the objects is not what you think. Your intuition is telling you that the identity is the combination of firstParam and secondParam. What truly is happening is each distinct instance of className has its own identity that does not rely on the implementation of the object. You will need to override the ...


1

You need to override/implement Equals() and GetHashCode(), right now you are listing distinct instances and they are correctly ALL distinct/unique from each other.


4

I am interested in the reason why you want to do this. This should do what you explained: public IQueryable<T> AsQueryable<T>(IEnumerable list) { return list.Cast<T>().AsQueryable(); } Call like this: IQueryable<SqlParameter> query = AsQueryable<SqlParameter>(sqlParameterCollection);


1

C# makes it very easy - all arrays implement both IList<T> and IEnumerable<T>. So it completely depends on the intended usage of the API. I always like to refer to the Guidelines for Collections for recommended practices on returning collection types. Also the usage guidelines for Arrays mentions this: DO prefer using collections over arrays ...


1

Well... if all you want is for someone to "just make this darn thing Enumerable", here goes... public class ProfilePics : System.Collections.IEnumerable { public string status { get; set; } public string filename { get; set; } public bool mainpic { get; set; } public string fullurl { get; set; } System.Collections.IEnumerator ...



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