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4

As the comments mentioned, Go doesn't support ternary one liners. The shortest form I can think of is this: var c int if c = b; a > b { c = a }


3

Here's an approach with dplyr: library(dplyr) df %>% mutate(tmp = c(0, diff(time)) * !event, tmp2 = cumsum(c(FALSE, as.logical(diff(event))))) %>% group_by(tmp2) %>% mutate(tae = cumsum(tmp), tbe = rev(cumsum(rev(tmp)))) %>% select(-tmp, -tmp2) The new columns include time after event (tae) and time before event ...


3

Thanks for pointing toward the correct answer. I have just checked the Golang FAQ (duh) and it clearly stats, this is not available in the language: Does Go have the ?: operator? There is no ternary form in Go. You may use the following to achieve the same result: if expr { n = trueVal } else { n = falseVal } additional info found that ...


3

I think you should use arrays $nordjyllandRegions = array("7900","7950","7960"); $midtjyllandRegions = array("8654","8660","8680","8700"); $zipcode = $_POST['postnummer']; if(in_array($zipcode, $nordjyllandRegions)) { $region = "Nordjylland"; } elseif (in_array($zipcode, $midtjyllandRegions)) { $region = "Midtjylland"; }


2

Yes that's a known issue - see also this answer. The solution is to store the logical expression into a variable, using a multiline statement: else { var logicalExpression = contains(JSONDict.keys.array, "id") && contains(JSONDict.keys.array, "part_number") && contains(JSONDict.keys.array, "sales_part_number") ...


2

When testing a variable for multiple values like this it is easier to use a Select Case statement. The reason why you are having issues is because you have not catered for all possible values and your logic is conflicting for certain values e.g. 0 > Handicap Or Handicap < 5. Select Case Handicap Case Is < 0 TxtRank.Text = ...


1

I guess you might be impressed by the compactness of dplyr, but going through a lot of unnecessary calculations really hurts your time performance... > loopfun <- function(df){ + + event <- (df$event == 100) + lasttime <- 0 + + time <- df$time + tae <- rep(0, nrow(df)) + + for(i in 1:nrow(df)){ + + if(event[i]){ + + ...


1

your 2nd if statement is inside the first if so take a look at your first if which match for number which is 45 only (check it). Your second if which will trigger right after the first if and only if first if is true which means your number is 45 -> will always be false because it's statement matches number >= 46 (only when > = 46 it returns true , but ...


1

You have too many useless options that make it hard to read. Try this: If (Handicap < 0) Then TxtRank.Text = "Championship" ElseIf Handicap < 5 Then TxtRank.Text = "Duffer" ElseIf Handicap < 10 Then TxtRank.Text = "Average" Else TxtRank.Text = "Hacker" End If


1

You have to write if($_POST['postnummer'] == "7900" || $_POST['postnummer'] == "7950" || $_POST['postnummer'] == "7960") { $region = "Nordjylland"; } elseif ($_POST['postnummer'] == "8654" || $_POST['postnummer'] == "8660" || $_POST['postnummer'] == "8680" || $_POST['postnummer'] == "8700") { $region = "Midtjylland"; }


1

You were very close with your dplyr implementation. Try this df %>% arrange(id, time) %>% group_by(id) %>% mutate(tae = cumsum(event==0)*12)


1

You should be using == or === for comparison. One = is for assignment. $('#3_gipfel').on({ click: function(){ var untergrund = $('.question1 .answer.active').data('answer-type'); if (untergrund == 1) $("#entdecker").show(); else if (untergrund == 2) $("#relaxer").show(); else $("#grenz").show(); } });


1

Another option is to do: indx <- Map(intersect, dimnames(t(m2)), dimnames(m1)) m1[indx[[1]], indx[[2]]] <- m2[indx[[2]], indx[[1]]] m1 # a b c d e #x 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 #y 1.2 0 1.5 0 1.4 #x 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0 Update Based on the dput output of m2 (in the comments), the colname of m2 is m2 and because there are no intersects between the rownames ...


1

No, they won't both execute. It goes in order of how you've written them, and logically this makes sense; Even though the second one reads 'else if', you can still think of it as 'else'. Consider a typical if/else block: if(true){ // Blah } else{ // Blah blah } If your first statement is true, you don't even bother looking at what needs to be done ...


1

When the condition after if is true, only the first block is executed. The else block is only executed when the condition is false. It doesn't matter what's in the else block, it's not executed. The fact that the else block is another if statement is irrelevant; it won't be executed, so it will never perform the (A > X || B > X) test, and its body will ...


1

If both A > X and B > Y are true then your code will only execute Action1. If one of the conditions is true it will execute Action2. If none are true, it will do nothing. Using this: if (A > X || B > Y) { Action2 if (A > X && B > Y) { Action1 } } will result in the possibility ...


1

If you're talking about C, then only the first block that satisfies the condition is executed - after the control "enters" the conditional block it then "leaves" after all other conditions. If you want such behavior, then just use two separate conditions - remove "else" and you have it.



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