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121

This allows you to override the macros when you're compiling: gcc -DMACRONAME=value The definitions in the header file are used as defaults.


51

As I said in the comment, imagine this situation: foo.h #define FOO 4 defs.h #ifndef FOO #define FOO 6 #endif #ifndef BAR #define BAR 4 #endif bar.c #include "foo.h" #include "defs.h" #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { printf("%d%d", FOO, BAR); return 0; } Will print 44. However, if the conditional ifndef was not there, the ...


17

I do not know the context but this can be used to give the user the availability to override the values set by those macro definitions. If the user explicitly defines a different value for any of those macros it will be used instead of the values used here. For instance in g++ you can use the -D flag during compilation to pass a value to a macro.


14

This is done so that the user of the header file can override the definitions from his/her code or from compiler's -D flag.


12

That's because this is not only common but mandatory in C: #include <something.h> While this is rarely used in Delphi. And when used, it's actually used to set up those {$DEFINE} 's: {$INCLUDE 'something.inc'} This matters because DEFINES are only valid while compiling one object (may it be a .PAS file or a .C file). Delphi uses the uses clause ...


8

#define's are translation unit-local, but definitions are not. You need to put extern UIClass Platform; in your header and UIClass Platform; in an implementation file. If you really want to have the definition in your header you can use some template class magic: namespace detail { // a template prevents multiple definitions template<bool = ...


7

About case 2: you should only declare the function signature, not the body. it has nothing to do with the pre-processor commands. in the header file (decleration only) #if <Condition> void foo(); #endif in the C file #if <Condition> void foo(){ //body } #endif about case 3: it's similar to case 2, with the addition that you should ...


7

Without. The standard specifies that #ifndef is equivalent to #if !defined, and that the argument to defined must be a (possibly parenthesized) identifier. You can't have parens in an identifier, so defined MACRO(X) is not an allowed form. This use of defined causes undefined behaviour, so it is not portable.


6

Any C project resides on multiple source files. When working on a single source file the checks seem to (and actually) have no point, but when working on a large C project, it's a good practice to check for existing defines before defining a constant. The idea is simple: you need the constant in that specific source file, but it may have been already defined ...


6

You can add -DNDEBUG to the following 3 variables - CFLAGS, CPPFLAGS and CXXFLAGS in your Makefile to define NDEBUG. Which is equivalent to adding #define NDEBUG There are other variations too: -DNBDEBUG=1 is equivalent to #define NDEBUG 1 And to answer the question of why would someone use #ifndef instead of #ifdef is because it highlights your ...


5

I think that you're misunderstanding the use of include guards. #ifndef __game_h_ #define __game_h_ // ... #endif The set of statements above would typically be used only in the header file describing your game interface, to prevent multiple-inclusion of that header file. But in your code, you've added include guards to header and implementation, and ...


4

header.h is not a valid identifier. You cannot have a period in a macro name. That said, the name you pick for your include guard macros is completely arbitrary. After all, it's just another variable. It is purely convention (and reasonable in order to avoid clashes) to name them after the file. I encourage you to phrase the header structure out aloud ...


4

Because you may get macro redefinition warnings otherwise. For example, we have some third party dll's who have headers with things like the following. #define PI 3.14 As these are defined in third party headers, we have no control over them and cannot remove or rename them. If we also try to define Pi ourselves, we would get a macro redefinition warning. ...


3

The problem is with the the #endif directive which is located inside the definition of the class (before the }; code), thus a second inclusion of this header file will only include the }; code causing the errors you got. BTW, instead of using the #ifndef pattern you can simply use #pragma once at the beginning of your file which has the same effect. You can ...


3

#ifndef won't omit the code if the flag is defined, hence it's usage. You've managed to include the code using #undef. Both #ifdef and #ifndef are useful, as justification consider this contrived example: you have a bunch of debug printf code that you only want to compile into a Debug build, using #ifdef DEBUG conditions. In the same executable you also ...


3

This pattern is NOT "common in C" code (.c or .cpp source files). It's common in C/C++ headers (.h) files: #ifndef SOMETHING #define SOMETHING #endif The reason is to prevent the SAME header from being inadvertantly including MULTIPLE TIMES in the same translation unit. For example, let's say module "a.c" uses header "b.h". And "b.h" #include's "c.h". ...


2

Because identifiers aren't allowed to start with a digit. This is covered in 2.11 Identifiers of the current C++ 11 standard, specifically the syntax section: identifier: identifier-nondigit # No digit allowed at front here. identifier identifier-nondigit # Nor here. identifier digit # Nor here.


2

You can combine the shell's facilities with Make's to get a fairly succinct definition. define compile @dir="${1}"; outdir="${2}"; outdir=$${outdir:-"$dir"}; \ $(COMPILER) -output-directory "$${outdir}" "$${dir:-.}/*.tex The double-dollar is an escape which passes a single dollar sign to the shell. The construct ${variable:-value} returns ...


2

One cool thing you can do with macros is define them on the command line, for gcc I often use gcc source.c -DMY_PI=6.5 and then in my code #ifndef MY_PI #define MY_PI 3.1415 #endif This allows me to compile the same code with many different definitions of MY_PI but also allows for a default value.


2

Because of the underscore I believe. It should be #ifndef CADENA_H and #define CADENA_H. Unless you want to keep the underscore in the name (not reccommended in this case), then it should be #ifndef _CADENA_H and #define _CADENA_H


2

You could think about a framework/library that gives to the user a default preset that allow the user to compile and work on it. Those defines are spreaded in different files and the final user is advised to include it's config.h file where he can config its values. If the user forgot some define the system can continue to work because of the preset.


2

Without parentheses. Because of this reason: test.c #ifdef MACRO(x) #endif int main() {} If you try to compile this: $ gcc test.c test.c:2:13: warning: extra tokens at end of #ifdef directive [enabled by default] #ifdef MACRO(x) ^ It gives a warning.


2

Is it possible that it does not get defined because I have the #define in a file not included in GPS.cpp? Yes defines in the source code only have file scope. if that is the case, what can I do to fix it? Use a shared header, something like this: #if !defined(MY_HEADER_H) #define MY_HEADER_H #define OS_TESTING #endif And then include ...


2

First example: #ifndef MyClass ... class MyClass { } #endif This cannot work, because 'MyClass' is never defined for the preprocessor. All directive starting with a # are preprocessor directives and are the only ones the preprocessor understands. class MyClass has no special meaning for the preprocessor, and won't create a preprocessor definition. For ...


1

As far as I can see, you don't need to include "B.h" in your "A.h" file. So remove it to reduce dependencies. Including "A.h" in your "B.h" file also seems unnecessary. A simple forward declaration should be sufficient. B.h #ifndef __B_H__ #define __B_H__ #include"Card.h" class A; // then you will have to include A.h in your B.cpp file struct B{ ...


1

Because #ifdef or #ifndef requires a preprocessor symbol after it, and these symbols cannot contain dots. In the C11 (latest draft) spec n1570 (ยง6.10.1): Preprocessing directives of the forms # ifdef identifier new-line group opt # ifndef identifier new-line group opt check whether the identifier is or is not currently defined as a macro ...


1

I got around the problem by splitting up the structs.h file into separate files: Point3DStruct.h and DeviceStructure.h. Now there is a need to have a circular dependency between structs.h and matrices.h.


1

You should keep this flag as Preprocessor macro instead of User Defined Settings.


1

Yes, definitely. The point of include guards is to make sure your code doesn't get included twice - if you have some code in your header files that's not inside the include guard, if you include that header twice, you're defining everything outside the guards twice. For a bit of a better idea of what's going on, your generated code looks something like ...



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